Mohammed Ali Mosque, Cairo

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  • The Mosque of Muhammad Ali Pasha
    The Mosque of Muhammad Ali Pasha
    by obcbreeze
  • Pyramids in the distance
    Pyramids in the distance
    by obcbreeze
  • The Mosque of Muhammad Ali Pasha
    The Mosque of Muhammad Ali Pasha
    by obcbreeze
  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Mohammed Ali Mosque

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Nov 24, 2007

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    The Mohammed Ali Mosque, often called the Alabaster Mosque is located on the south side of the Citadel. It is almost certainly the first feature that catches ones eyes at the fortress. It is one of the city's great landmarks with its tall and disproportionately slender minarets which are seen from almost everywhere in Cairo.

    The Mosque is the most popular Islamic mosque among numerous tourists. It was begun in 1824 by Mohammed Ali and completed in 1857, under his successor Said. Muhammad Ali erected this mosque, where he is buried, as a monument to himself. The architect Yusuf Boshna from Istanbul, who was a Greek, took as his model the Nuruosmaniye Mosque in that city, which was modeled itself on the Hagia Sophia.

    You may find the exact direction and watch my photos on Google Earth in Islamic Cairo according to the following coordinates:
    30º 1' 54.14" N and 31º 15' 25.99" E

    Cairo - Mohammed Ali Mosque Cairo - Mohammed Ali Mosque Cairo - Mohammed Ali Mosque Cairo - Mohammed Ali Mosque Cairo - Mohammed Ali Mosque
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  • Heavens-Mirror's Profile Photo

    ~ Mohammed Ali Mosque ~

    by Heavens-Mirror Updated Oct 4, 2005

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    One of Cairo's most popular tourist attractions is the Mohammed Ali Mosque. it is one of the worlds greatest monuments , as well as a highly visible landmark on Cairo's eastern skyline. Particularly when viewed from the back side it reveals a very medieval character.

    I enjoyed it here at the Mosque but you must respect the religion when visiting, women should cover up arms & legs.. but wear something light as it is very warm inside.

    It was a gorgeous day when i visited the Mosque, check out this photo.... the sky is so blue!

    Me outside the Mohammed Ali Mosque

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  • hez28's Profile Photo

    Mosque of Mohammed Ali

    by hez28 Written Aug 30, 2005

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    a.k.a. Alabaster Mosque. This Turkish-style mosque took 18 years to build. Mohammed Ali came in power after Napoleon's french expedition and built this mosque. He lies in the marble tomb on the right side of the mosque. This mosque looks graceful in Cairo's eastern skyline, u can't miss it!

    Please wear proper attire to enter this mosque.

    Note: There's a a chintzy clock in the central courtyard. It was a gift from king louis phillpe of France in gratitude for the pharaonic obelisk that graces the place de la concorde in paris today.

    Mosque of Mohammed Ali Inside the mosque Me inside the mosque
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    The alabaster mosque

    by xaver Written Jan 5, 2013

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    On the south side of the main courtyard of the citadel we find the Mohamed Ali mosque, which is also known as the alabaster mosque, this is definitely one of the citadel main attractions. It was begun in 1824 by Mohamed Ali and completed in 1857, by his successor Said. The architect was Greek living in Istambul and took as model Nuruosmaniye Mosque which was modelled on the Hagia Sophia.

    mosque
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  • smirnofforiginal's Profile Photo

    The Mosque of Mohammed Ali

    by smirnofforiginal Updated Apr 17, 2007

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    White marble, sitting on a high. It's a bit fat and squat but it is quite magnificent.

    Ladies, cover your flesh (but no head cover is required) - if you are dressed inappropriately it's not a problem as they have bright emerald graduation robes for you to don.

    This mosque is Turkish in style (due to Mohammed Ali having been a Turk) and is shown by the star above the moon. It took 17 years to build and then just as it was completed Mohammed dropped dead. The craftsmanship that has gone into every aspect of this mosque is fantastic.

    Inside is busy with decoration and ioozing with opulence. It's all original, including the chains that hold the mammouth chandeliers (maybe don't sit beneath!) and the mats.

    Some great views to behold of Cairo, Holy Mountain, the citadel etc...

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  • atufft's Profile Photo

    Muhammad Ali Mosque and Citadel: 1960 & Now

    by atufft Updated May 15, 2006

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    The citadel and mosque of Mohammad Ali was a place of refuge for the Albanian born Ottoman Pasha to retreat during times of rebellion among citizens of Cairo, and occasionally his own army. It was built during the early 19th century when Belzoni, a former circus strongman and first archeologist of note in the Egyptian ruins, busied himself with trying to sell the Pasha a new hydraulic system for pulling water from the Nile, and with trying to hoist monolithic granite monuments onto boats destine for London. The citadel itself is older than the mosque and represents the last improvements of a defensive system that began centuries early, particularly under the Mamluk dynasties. When the Ottoman leader took charge, he leveled the Mamluk pasha palaces and built the mosque. The mosque is one of the largest in the world with a multiple dome system and the world's highest minarets. Unlike the older mosques adjacent to it, the Muhammad Ali mosque is distinctively Ottoman in style and strongly influenced by European design in its exterior ornamentation. Those entering the courtyard and mosque must remove their shoes. My Aunt and Uncle visited the citadel and mosque in 1960. Note the relative absence of cars and people during that time. When we visited the mosque in 1997, we found it to be a very busy place, but otherwise much in appearance the same as in 1960. Some scaffolding was up for repair of the beautiful exterior colored stonework. The last image here is actually an important entrance gate to the old walled city built in 1092. In the Mongol era the heads of six messengers of Hulagu (the Mongol leader) were hanged on it as a response of the Egyptian Sultan to Hulagu's threats of attacking Egypt. Later, Mamluk and Ottoman leader's customarily held executions here.

    Muhammad Ali Mosque in 1960 Mohammad Ali Mosque in 1997 Bab Zuweila (now called Bab Mutwalli by locals) Mohammad Ali Mosque Interior in 1960 Portico and Courtyard in 1960
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  • Aurorae's Profile Photo

    Mohammed Ali Mosque

    by Aurorae Written Oct 20, 2002

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    Perhaps the most spectacular mosque in Cairo, and its symbol, Mohammed Ali's mosque, within the walls of the fortress, it's overlooking the city from the height. Mohammed Ali was of Albanian origin, and born in Kavala, Greece. he was one of the soldiers in the troops sent to release Egypt from Napoleon's occupation.
    The mosque was built in 1830 in two parts, in Byzantine style. The architect was A Greek, Yusuf Bushnak, who lived in Turkey and he used as a model Aya Sofia in Istanbul.

    Mohammed Ali mosque

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  • PierreZA's Profile Photo

    Mohammed Ali

    by PierreZA Updated Oct 6, 2007

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    This great mosque is within the citadel.
    It is a beatiful building, which took around 18 years to build.
    Quite out of place is the 'clock tower', a gift from France, which was never in working oreder, as it fell on arrival in Egypt.
    The architecture shows a definite Turkish influence.
    The inside is also splendid.
    It is worth taking a guided tour - it does make a difference.
    Please respect the religion, as the mosque is used for prayers etc.

    Mohammed Ali Mosque Inside Mohammed Ali Mosque
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  • kentishgirl's Profile Photo

    Mosque of Mohammed Ali

    by kentishgirl Updated Jan 19, 2007

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    This mosque is spectacular, just take a peek at the photo to see the encrusetd insides of the mosque - its wonderful!
    Again this mosque had plenty of other visitors, entry was as usual free and Here I had to don one of those green robes I was telling you about!

    Inside Mosque of Mohammed Ali
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  • freya_heaven's Profile Photo

    Mosque of Mohammed Ali

    by freya_heaven Updated Oct 10, 2004

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    The Mosque of Mohammed Ali, is also know as the Alabaster Mosque. It is in the Islamic area of Cairo ( although it didnt seem any more Islamic than the rest of the city! )

    The Mosque was built in the 1830s & 40s, by Mohammed Ali, and he is also buried inside.

    Muhammed Ali Mosque

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  • viddra's Profile Photo

    The Mohammed Ali Mosque 2

    by viddra Written Jun 9, 2005

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    The Mosque was named after Mohammed Ali, an Albanian officer who spoke no Arabic. He was appointed Pasha by the Ottoman Sultan.
    Under his rule, industry and agriculture prospered, roads were built and in the Citadel barracks and palaces were constructed.
    He died in 1849 and was buried in his Mosque in the Citadel.

    the Alabaster Mosque

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  • al2401's Profile Photo

    Mohammed Ali Pasha mosque

    by al2401 Updated Sep 18, 2010

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    The mosque of Mohammed Ali Pasha is also known as the Alabaster Mosque because it was tiled on the outside with alabaster. Now only the lower level remains tiled. It was built between 1830 and 1848 on the citadel of Saladin (12th C).

    You may visit the mosque except during prayer. Dress for both men and women is respectful - no skimpy clothes or shorts. Women must cover their shoulders and it is polite to cover your head as well. A scarf is an essential extra when travelling in Egypt. Shoes must not be worn inside the mosque.

    Ceiling detail - Mohammed Ali Pasha mosque Fountain - Mohammed Ali Pasha mosque Courtyard - Mohammed Ali Pasha mosque Alabaster walls - Mohammed Ali Pasha mosque Interior - Mohammed Ali Pasha mosque
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  • SallyM's Profile Photo

    Mosque of Mohammed Ali

    by SallyM Updated May 31, 2009

    TOne of the most striking buildings at the citadel is the Mosque of Mohammed Ali. He was an Albanian soldier who declared Egyptian independence from the Ottoman Empire early in the nineteenth century and founded the royal line that endured until 1952.

    This mosque is supposed to be based on Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, and therefore takes the form of an early Christian basilica.

    If visiting in winter, wear thick socks, as the courtyard of the Mosque can be freezing cold when you remove your shoes. [I haven't been in summer, but I imagine that socks would also be a good idea to protect your feet from hot paving stones!]

    Mosque of Mohammed Ali
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  • clueless83's Profile Photo

    The mosque of Muhammad Ali

    by clueless83 Written Jun 13, 2010

    The first stop of our Cairo tour was at the mosque of Muhammad Ali which was commissioned by Muhammad Ali (the ruler not the boxer) between 1830 and 1848. Thats about as much history as I can be bothered to write as I think this sort of thing is best learned while you are there and experiencing it.

    Ladies, you will be expected to wear a green tent like thing if you aren't covered up. These are free of charge but pretty irritating when you are trying to take pictures. Everyone is also expected to remove their shoes which makes it even more awkward trying to carry your shoes, wear a green tent and take photos! However, you will get some pretty pictures.
    Outside the mosque you will get a good view of Cairo. See my pictures for more!

    Muhammad Ali's Mosque Pretty lights inside the mosque View of Cairo from mosque Sexy tent thing! Mohammad Ali's mosque
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  • obcbreeze's Profile Photo

    The Mosque of Muhammad Ali Pasha

    by obcbreeze Written Nov 5, 2011

    It's a bit of a climb to reach the mosque, but well worth it. You are able to enter the buildings and roam freely. As opposed to other places in Cairo there are very few vendors here. The architecture is stunning as are the views.

    The Mosque of Muhammad Ali Pasha The Mosque of Muhammad Ali Pasha Pyramids in the distance

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