Kumasi Things to Do

  • Brass caster Paul in Krofrom
    Brass caster Paul in Krofrom
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  • Kumasi downtown
    Kumasi downtown
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  • The fontaine in Kumasi market
    The fontaine in Kumasi market
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Most Recent Things to Do in Kumasi

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    Trading streets

    by Pieter11 Updated Mar 12, 2007

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    Coffins at the roadside in Kumasi
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    A fascinating thing to see in central Kumasi are the many streets that are completely full of large and small market stalls in open air. Everything is origanised according to product-type, and everything is huge!

    Two of the streets are the mainstreets in- and out the city. The road heading north is full of everything you can ever think of for cars. Headlights, wheels and tyres, window wipers but also complete engines are for sale at the side of the road. It is said that you shouldn't leave your car here unattended in the area, otherwise you'll find it back in piece in several of the many stalls.

    The road heading south coming from the centre, is full of all wooden products. Window- and doorframes, tables, chairs, but even custom made coffins that are made at the side of the roads are for sale everywhere.

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    Kumasi Market

    by grets Written Jan 21, 2007

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    Wild, chaotic, busy, rowdy, hectic, crazy, riotous, frenzied, confused and full of activity – Kumasi market is all these things and much, much more. The largest outdoor market in West Africa, it is certainly the largest and most crowded market we’ve ever been to. Everything you could possibly want – and quite a few things you are sure NOT TO want – is available here, from clothing, household good, food, furniture, gifts and everything else in-between.

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    Manhyia Palace Museum

    by grets Written Jan 21, 2007

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    Manhyia Palace Museum
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    The former Royal Palace has now been turned in to a museum. The palace is modest by European standards, but offers an interesting insight into the way of life of the Ashanti rulers and their culture. The palace was built in 1925 by the British as compensation after razing the original palace to the ground by fire whilst searching for the Golden Stool (which incidentally they did not find as it was hidden away. The British took away what they thought was the Golden Stool, which in reality was a replica painting with gold paint.) The proud Ashanti, however, refused to accept the building as a gift, and insisted in paying for it.

    The palace was the residence of Nana Agyeman Prempeh I and Nana Sir Osei Agyeman Prempeh II – the 13th and 14th kings of the Ashanti Kingdom, and much paraphernalia pretaining to their reign can be found within the palace museum, such as foot rests, guns, pictures, chairs, furniture, models of the kings (VERY lifelike indeed!!!!), cloths, peace pipes, scales and much more. We had a very informative but slightly eccentric guide, who would repeat himself, not once, but several times. Although photographs were not permitted inside the palace museum, in the room with the model of Nana Yaa Asantewaa, the Queen Mother who led the 1900 war against the British, he locked the door and suggested we took pictures.

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    The Craft Centre

    by grets Written Jan 21, 2007

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    The Craft Centre is a part of the Cultural Centre, but I must confess I found it disorganised and somewhat ramshackle. There were some good items of arts and crafts on sale, but they were spread about over a fairly wide area and I felt as if I had to really go in search of finding something to buy. The sales people were not too aggressive, which was nice. I bought some jewellery and I was tempted by some beautiful paintings, but as it was lunchtime, there was no-one about to give me a price of the works and I was in a hurry because we had an audience with the King, so I had to leave it.

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    Ashanti Besease Shrine

    by grets Written Jan 13, 2007

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    The ancestral shrine house at Besease was built around 1850 and is one of ten remaining examples of traditional Ashanti architecture. Most were destroyed by the British. The shrine is included in the UNESCO World Heritage List.

    More information about the shrine house traditions can be found under the Local Customs heading

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    Meet the king

    by grets Written Jan 13, 2007

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    King Nana Okyere-Antwi I and us

    One of the highlights of my visit to Ghana was meeting Nana Okyere-Antwi I, the Ashanti King. Our trusted guide, Noah, had managed to secure us an audience with the king, through a local contact. We shook hands are he explained about the Ashanti kingdom and its culture before allowing us time to ask questions and take photographs. You may not address the king directly; you talk to him through his assistant who would in turn present the question to the king. In fact, we would ask Noah the question, he would relay that to the local guide/interpreter who again would pose the question to the king’s assistant. It was a surreal and extraordinary experience and one which I will never forget.

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    Ashanti Traditional Museum

    by grets Written Jan 13, 2007

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    Ashanti Traditional Museum

    The Ashanti Traditional Museum is housed within the Cultural Centre in Kumasi. Unfortunately, no photography is permitted inside.

    The museum houses traditional artifacts and possessions from the Ashanti Royal family amongst other things. I found the following items of interest:

    Stools and chairs captured by the British which were brought back by Queen Elizabeth on her visit to Ghana in 1965

    Weights used to measure gold dust. Gold dust was used as a currency for some time in Ghana.

    Replica of the king’s bathroom.

    The king should not place his feet on the floor as this would annul his position, so a foot rest of ivory is placed in front of his seat.

    Sculptures, palanquins, staff, stools and swords, including the replica golden stool (which the Ashanti fobbed the English off with as the real thing when they ransacked the palace) which was brought back in 1969 – with the gold covering removed!

    Umbrella tops. The king would always have a servant carrying an umbrella over his head and the tops of these umbrellas are very symbolic: a duck means that you shuold look backwards; a horn signifies power and a hand illustrates how you cannot tie a knot without a thumb!

    A replica of the king’s kitchen. Women were not allowed to cook for the king because jealousy may entice them to poison him, as well as the belief that menstruating women are dirty. The chief cook would always taste the king’s food first, to ensure it was not poisoned.

    A leopard skin drum which when rubbed with a stick over the skin, sounds just like the roar of a leopard. This was used to scare off enemies, making them believe that there really was a dangerous animal around.

    The king’s sandals, with the wooden ones used on rainy days and the gold for ceremonies.

    Kente cloth, old clothes, spittoons and many other items. It is worth having a guide to explain it all to you.

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    Churches in Kumasi

    by atufft Updated Jun 5, 2006

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    Methodist Church in Kumasi
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    The string of first missionaries to Ghana quickly died of malaria, but eventually, Ghana became a great success story for the Protestant and Catholic denominations that sent missionaries there. The leading churches in Ghana are the Methodist, Presbyterian, and Anglican Churches, but the Catholic Church, and more recently, the Baptist and Pentacostal Churches have considerable representation. About a third of Ghana is Muslim, but everyone is generally very harmonious about religion, and all over Ghana, traditional tribal spirtualism remains an important part of life. The strength of Christian belief in Ghana is very high as images of Christ and Christian slogans are proudly painted onto vehicles and in homes. Thus, Ghana represents the front line of Christian and Muslim missionary activity, as the Christians moved north from the Gold Coast Slave Fortresses and the Muslim armies and slave traders moved south from the Sahara. At the present time, the Christians seem to be having greater success because the many non-government aid organizations are from the various churches, such as the educational unit of the Presbyterian Church shown here. Thus, while Christian efforts have been a miserable failure in the Arab Middle East, the Muslims have neglected the needs of Africans south of the Sahara, many of whom are converting to Christianity as a way for salvation in this world--food, medical care, and education. Most Churches provide multi-lingual services. In Kumasi, that would typically mean one service in English and another in Akan.

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    Ashante Soccer in Kumasi

    by atufft Written Feb 17, 2006

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    Kumasi 80,000 seat Stadium
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    Soccer, otherwise known as football in the world, is naturally very popular in Ghana and the Ghanians are very good at it. I paid modest ticket prices for myself and my friend to watch Ghana beat soundly a visiting Morrocco club. The players in Ghana can run fast and scrap well for the ball. The Morroccan's tried a finesse passing game, but it didn't work. The Ghana club was too hard hitting. The stadium design isn't the greatest as a iron fence separates the fans from the field at the lower levels, but this is the largest stadium in the nation and in a city that is fanatical about the sport. Although saches of water pelted the field, I didn't see any of the unruly barbarism behavior frequently seen at the uncivilized European soccer matches.

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    Kumasi Open Market is for people watching

    by atufft Written Oct 5, 2005

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    Christian Fabric Vendors
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    Browse the meat market, currency exchange booth area, tools, toys or row after row of fabrics and clothes--This is the open Market in Kumasi. Central located in a large and spread out city, at least a morning can be spent here people watching or selecting cotton print and batik fabrics. I took advantage of the photogenic vendors...

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    Open Air Market--Crowded Alleys

    by atufft Updated Mar 23, 2007

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    Kumasi Open Air Market
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    People who fear touching others will fear this place. I found the labyrinth of alleys fun though...Many of the molded plastic junk in made in India or China.

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Kumasi Things to Do

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