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  • Alpha_Ghana's Profile Photo

    Meeting people

    by Alpha_Ghana Updated May 16, 2004

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: When you meet people, you don't just shake the hand. When you meet somebody in Ghana, you shake the hand and you also slam the medius with your friend's one.

    When you meet several people, you must also start greting and shaking hand from the right to the left. Starting from the left is very inpolite.

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  • Alpha_Ghana's Profile Photo

    Post office.

    by Alpha_Ghana Updated May 16, 2004

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Post office.
    Post is very slow in Ghana, but not much than in other African countries.

    You must have a PO BOX because there is no postman delivering the mail. (there is even no addresses).

    When you want to send mail, post it at the main post office or at the airport. Else, it takes too long.

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  • Alpha_Ghana's Profile Photo

    Palm Wine

    by Alpha_Ghana Updated May 8, 2004

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Palm Wine
    In West Africa, they drink Palm Wine.

    Ghanaian are even more drinking this alcohol because they have a lot of palm trees and also because religion does not prevent them from drinking alcoholic beverages from time to time.

    This alcool is coming from the typical palm tree for production of palm oil.
    This palm tree is cultivated to give fresh fruits. Thoses fruits are pressed and give this oil.

    In Europe they use this oil for production of soap and other beauty products.
    In Ghana too, but they also use the palm kernel oil in the food. It is a good red oil they add to lots of local dishes.

    Fondest memory: The tree gives fruits during 27 years, from the 3rd till the 30st. After, the tree is so tall that they cannot harvest the fruits anymore. So, they chop it down and take the sap to make alcool.
    This is very good and nice to drink a cup with some Ghanaian friends.
    When they cut the tree, the day after, there is some nice light alcoholised juice, sometimes naturally sparkling.
    Everyday, the production of alcohol becomes stronger and at the end, it cam be more than 50 degrees, however everythin is usually already taken at this time.
    Palm wine is better in the early days.
    It is not possible to conserve it, so you drink it on place. Take it back to Europe is not possible. I tasted some bottled palm wine in Senegal, but that is just for tourists and does not taste the real one.

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  • Wafro's Profile Photo

    An ancient city, but a beautiful one. See it.

    by Wafro Written Apr 26, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Cape Coast was the capital of the British Gold Coast possessions until the 1870s, when the capital was transferred to Accra. At the port in Cape Coast, they export products of the district, such as frozen fish, cacao, coconuts, citrus fruits, corn, and cassava. Cape coast is also known for its qualitative university.

    Fort William
    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Beaches

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  • Wafro's Profile Photo

    An ancient city, but a beautiful one. See it.

    by Wafro Written Apr 26, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Cape Coast is the capital of the Central Region. The area was settled by the Portuguese in 1610. The Swedes built in 1652 the fort of Carolusberg, which passed to the Dutch in 1659 and to the British in 1667.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • sachara's Profile Photo

    Accra, djembe playing at a sunday afternoon

    by sachara Updated Apr 7, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: After many hours at a shady terrace of Akuma Village, looking at the blue ocean at a lazy sunday afternoon, Louis, a local boy, invited me to his shop nearby. at the Arts Centre. After he showed me the newly made djembes in his workshop, his friends came in and started to play at the djembes for a long long time. It was real fun.

    djembe drumming
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Music

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  • sarahandgareth's Profile Photo

    Listen to the radio!

    by sarahandgareth Updated Jul 3, 2003

    Favorite thing: Ghanaian FM stations, most of which are less than ten years old, are extremely lively, and if you want to get a sense of what Ghanaians are talking about, you have to listen to the phone-in shows, especially on the influential Joy FM. These radio stations were an important part of the victory of President Kuffour in the elections of December 2000, which were a radical change for Ghanaian politics. They also play decent music, a mixture of local pop and international hits.

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  • sarahandgareth's Profile Photo

    Eating in Ghana

    by sarahandgareth Written Jul 3, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The most common feature of Ghanaian meals is a soup, more like what Westerners think of a sauce, accompanied by a starch.

    The most common starch staple is fufu, which is cooked cassava, plantain or yam, mashed up and formed into a ball. Most people barely chew this at all, just letting it slip down. Kenkey is also pretty common, and is corn mash that has been fermented. It often gives visitors stomach trouble on their first try.

    Some of the most common soups/sauces are a peanut soup with tomatoes and onions, and another with tomatoes and eggs. Both also have fish or meat. For the more adventurous, ***o sauce is a very hot pepper soup, guaranteed to have you sweating!

    Some of the other dishes I especially liked included jollof rice (rice with tomatoes, meat and spices) and red red, or blackeyed peas with gari (a kind of flour) and meat/fish, which comes with fried plantain.

    The cheapest restaurants around are called 'chop houses', and are most popular at lunchtime. At the streetside, women sell skewers of barbecued meat (which you can put into bread: a great snack) or plantain or yam chips, highly seasoned, among other dishes. Some women walk around with little glass boxes on their heads, with heavy cakes inside; they will compete for business, and occasionally start fighting if one woman thinks another has 'stolen' her customer, which gives some idea, too, of the precarious economic situation of these vendors.

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  • Whoopi's Profile Photo

    Washi washi...

    by Whoopi Written Dec 30, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: Please.....learn how to wash by hand before you come to Ghana. They will teach you AND have a good laugh of you....but it is a very social activity, especially for us women....washingtime is girltalk-time :)

    Me and my buckets

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  • Whoopi's Profile Photo

    You just HAVE to visit the...

    by Whoopi Updated Dec 30, 2002

    0.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: You just HAVE to visit the Mole National Park, Pagga crockodile park in the north, Volta lake (one of the biggest man made lakes in the whole world), Nzulezo (a village built on poles in the water), and of course all the museums, beaches, cities like Kumasi, Takoradi, Accra and Koforidua, the slave fortresses....I could go on forever....

    Fondest memory: What I miss most is all the wonderful friends I made.
    I think one of my foundest memories is when I went on a trip with three of my friends to a small place outside Koforidua to see Buti Falls.
    It is a beautiful place in the foot of the mountain with two big waterfalls and a shrine for the idol worshipers near by. We also climped the steep path up to umbrella rock which is a fantastic stone that looks like an umbrella. Can't really explain how something so huge could turn out in a shape like that but the natives told us that the gods did it. When you reach there and you've forgot your water and are dying of thirst, the villagers will guide you to the nearest mangotree and you can pick your own juicy fruit from the branches.
    Wonderful.....

    Buti falls...

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  • seratonin's Profile Photo

    Kakum national park

    by seratonin Written Nov 20, 2002

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: About one hour by bush taxi from Cape Coast, there is the Kakum National park.
    It is in an area of rain forest. The main attraction of the park are for sure the swinging bridges up to 40 meters above ground. Ther you can explore the animals living in the higher parts of the immense trees.
    On ground, you will see, of corse, a lot of different plants. It seems like it si not very often that you are able to see bigger animals during the day. For this you should come in the early morning or late evening.

    Swinging bridge

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  • seratonin's Profile Photo

    Ghana

    by seratonin Written Nov 20, 2002

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Ghana is one of the coastal countries in westafrica. In contrast to its neighbours, it was once a british colony what explains why many people there are english speaking.
    For tourists, it is more or less a easy-going place, as transport seems to be not a big problem, and some places are quite touristy. I've met there more backpackers than in other west african countries.
    The people are very friendly and relaxed. This causes a good atmosphere in the villages and even in the big cities like Accra

    Fondest memory: The peaceful atmosphere everywhere in the country

    Accra main train station

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  • sbeedham's Profile Photo

    Try the local food. Some of...

    by sbeedham Written Sep 7, 2002

    Favorite thing: Try the local food. Some of it is down right distgusting, like the smoked rat in the grasslands while the rest of it is an experience. Must try the RED RED (red chilli beans) & plantaine (fried banana like) - my favourtie dish.

    Fondest memory: The children in the villages are the best. I had more fun playing with them and their paper soccer ball than anything else. They made me laugh no end. We sat on mud steps and watched the sun set. These moments were some of the most grounding moments of my life.

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  • Cassia_love's Profile Photo

    GO TO VOLTA REGION, IT IS...

    by Cassia_love Written Aug 26, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: GO TO VOLTA REGION, IT IS BEAUTIFUL...MAKE SURE TO CHECK OUT OKOSOMBO LAKE, CAPE COAST, TAMALE, TECHIMEN,

    AND FOR MORE WONDERFUL PLACES TO GO SEE AND HIKE TOO...EMAIL ME...OR CHECK OUT THE GUIDE TO GHANA, AS I CAN'T REMEMBER ALL THE NAMES.

    Fondest memory: ALL THE WATERFALLS I VISITED (3 SITES) THE LITTLE VILLIAGE OF NKORANZA...MOUNT ADAKLU, VILLIAGE OF AMEDJOPE

    AND HO...WHICH IS WHERE I WORKED. IT IS IN THE VOLTA REGION, AND IT WAS A WONDERFUL PLACE

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  • evliyasems's Profile Photo

    Location: Ghana is situated...

    by evliyasems Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Location: Ghana is situated in West Africa, just above the Equator. The Greenwich Meridian passes through its main industrial city, Tema. It lies between latitude four degrees 45 minutes and 11 degrees 11 minutes North and extends from Longitude one degree 14 minutes east to three degrees 17 minutes west. Ghana shares common boundaries with Togo in the east, Burkina Faso in the north and Cote d'Ivoire in the West. The Atlantic Ocean is in the south.

    Ghana is divided into 10 administrative regions and 110 district assemblies.
    The Regions are: Greater Accra, Eastern, Western, Central, Volta, Brong Ahafo, Ashanti, Northern, Upper East & Upper West.
    Capital: Accra.

    Status: Republic. Former British colony. It won independence on March 6, 1957 and became the first country south of the Sahara to be free. She became a Republic on July 1, 1960.


    Population: About 20million.

    Area: 238,537 square kilometres.

    Climate: Tropical. Temperatures are generally between 21 and 32 degrees Celcius. It is usually breezy and sunny. In the South, there are two rainy seasons, from March to July and from September to October, separated by a short dry season in August and a relatively long dry season from mid-October to March. The north has only one rainy season, that is, from July to September.

    It is hot and humid in the southwest, with annual rainfall averaging 2,030mm. The extreme southwest, around Axim, records the heaviest rainfall. The southeast coast is warm and comparatively dry; the north is hot and dry.

    Ghana has about 550 kilometres of coastline of sandy beaches.
    The vegetation of coastal plains give way to tropical forest at the centre while the north is savannah.

    Ethnic groups: Twi and Fanti-speaking Akans (44 per cent), Mole-Dagombas (16 per cent), Ewes (13 per cent) others (27 per cent).

    Religion: Christian (63 per cent), Muslims (16 per cent), traditional religion (21 per cent).

    Languages: English (official). The main local languages are Twi, Fanti, Ewe, Ga and Dagbani.

    International Affiliation: Member of the UN, Commonwealth, Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), Organisation of African Unity (OAU), Non-Aligned Movement (NAM), others.

    Workforce: Basically an agricultural country. Agriculture accounts for about 45 per cent of Gross Domestic Product and employs about 60 per cent of labour force.

    Government: Parliamentary democracy. The Constitution of the Fourth republic was approved at a referendum held on 28th April, 1992 and came into force on 7th January, 1993. Single chamber of 200 Parliamentary members.

    Education: Ghana operates a 12-year pre-university education – six years of primary and three years each of Junior Secondary School and Senior Secondary School. Ghana has five public Universities and other private universities, eight Polytechnics and 22 Technical Institutions.

    Currency: Cedi/Pesewa. (100 Pesewas = one cedi). Flexible exchange rate.

    Economy: Main exports are gold, cocoa, timber, bauxite, manganese, diamonds which are called traditional exports, and horticultural products, handicraft, processed food and manufactured goods called non-traditional exports. (ref : www.ghana.com)

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