Unique Places in Ghana

  • Fishing boats at Nungua beach
    Fishing boats at Nungua beach
    by georeiser
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by grets
  • Guinness Ghana Brewery Ltd, Kumasi
    Guinness Ghana Brewery Ltd, Kumasi
    by Twan

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Ghana

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    Cassava Plantations

    by grets Written Jan 12, 2007

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    Also known as the manioc, cassava is grown for its large, starch-filled root. It is extensively cultivated as an annual crop throughout Africa, and in every village you can see the ladies pounding the cassava to make fufu – the staple carbohydrate of West Africa. There are many other ways of eating cassava too, including boiled and fried, but the root cannot be eaten raw as it contains substances which convert to cyanide. A flour is made from cassava root too, known as tapioca flour.
    Cassava is best eaten very fresh, as the flavour goes off as quickly as one or two days after harvesting, which makes it tricky for export.

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    • Eco-Tourism

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    Okra Plantations

    by grets Written Jan 12, 2007

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    Okra is grown in many parts of Africa, it is an ancient plant originating from Ethiopia. It beings to the family Malvaceae. Okra can be either annual or perennial and the plant grows upright to a height of 2m. Okra is one of the most heat- and drought-tolerant vegetables in the world; once the plant has become established, it can survive severe drought conditions. This could be one of the reasons it is grown so widely in Africa.

    The plant is grown for its 7-9cm-long fruit and is usually eaten while young as older fruits can become woody. The fruits are used as a thickening agent in many dishes, as they produce a glutinous substance when cooked. Okra leaves may also be eaten, either cooked or added to salads.

    Okra was brought to America with the slave route and is now a very popular vegetable in the States.

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    Palm Spirit

    by grets Written Jan 12, 2007

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    The palm wine is further fermented for four to six days in large drums like the ones in picture one.

    The drums are then heated by placing them over an open fire (see picture two), raising them from the flames with the use of car wheel rims.

    The liquid is then channeled through cold water into different containers as shown in picture three.

    The liquid is left in the drums to ferment for a further four-six days before being drawn off into suitable containers.

    We were given a tasting of the finished product of course, in a small plastic glass being handed round (picture five). It was strong, local fire water, but I have tasted worse. The resulting alcoholic drink is known as SODABI.

    We bought a large bottle of the stuff (having to provide our own container as they didn’t have any), but I must admit, it didn’t taste quite the same in a glass with a mixer that evening. I have to confess to leaving the bottle behind in the hotel room for the maid. It cost us just over $1 per litre.

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    • Wine Tasting
    • Photography

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    Palm Wine

    by grets Written Jan 12, 2007

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    After three years, the Zomi Palm no longer produces satisfactory fruits, so the tree is cut down. The leaves are dried and used to produce brooms and palm wine is manufactured from the trunk. A hole is cut in the trunk and a fire is lit inside. When that has died out, the sides of the cavity are scraped and a small channel is cut to allow the palm wine to drip into a container placed below (see picture two). Each tree will produce 8-10 litres of this non-alcoholic drink. We tried some of it (picture three), and it was a quite pleasant, thick, milky liquid, a bit sweet.

    Once the tree no longer gives off any more palm wine, the trunk is used as fire wood.

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    Zomi Palm Fruit

    by grets Written Jan 12, 2007

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    The Zomi palm produces huge bunches of red fruits from about eight months after planting. The palms are propagated by seed and planted out after eighteen months. The fruit takes 5-6 months to ripen after pollination.

    Once the fruit is harvested, it is left in large bunches at the side of the road to be transported to the market, where it is sold for the production of palm oil. The fruit is very greasy and will give off a reddish oil after just a few minutes in the hand as you can see from picture five.

    The fruits were also traditionally used in the local culture – prior to asking for a young girl’s hand, the suitor must show that he is hard working and worthy of the young girl’s affections. He will present his prospective father-in-law with many bunches of fruits, bearing some on his shoulders to show his strength. See picture four.

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    Oil Palms

    by grets Written Jan 12, 2007

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    These palm trees are found all over Ghana, and are used in a variety of ways. The Latin name is Elaeis guineensis and they are known throughout the world as oil palms, and are found in many other countries too. The palms are called the Zomi Palm is Ghana and neighbouring countries. They are big business in this part of the world, and hailed as a new social reform. However, the clearing of other forests to make room for the plantations, cause erosion and the oil processing industries dump masses of effluents into the river causing pollution.

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    Burkino Faso boarder Sirigu

    by bobkey Updated Sep 4, 2006

    Drive from Bolgatanga about 35miles and you will find a women's organization for pottery & art . Run by founder & manager Melanie Kasise who we met .
    This is a wonderful project to see And very good artwork can be purchased at very reasonable prices.
    The surrounding country is saharan dotted with baobab trees.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Women's Travel
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Great beach walk

    by mpanizza Written Sep 4, 2006

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    If you're feeling like a nice long walk with plenty to see along the way, take the 10km hike from Elmina to Brenu beach along the coast. You go through a couple of villages on the way that are nice and the scenery is fantastic

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    Palm Oil to palm wine

    by bobkey Written Aug 31, 2006

    On the way to Kalkum National Park just north of Cape Coast. We met a family who showed us all the production stages of Palm oil. Every part of the palm has its use even to the manufacture of palm wine ( Suppose to send you crazy). Havent tried any!!!

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    • Food and Dining

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    Nzulezo Stilt Village

    by Wafro Written Aug 16, 2005

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    Nzulezo is a village built entirely on stilts and located near Beyin in the pristine Amansuri wetland/Lagoon.
    It is constructed out of wood, raffia and steel plates.
    The village has a population between 500 and 600 people.
    In this area you’ll find a variety of animal, monkeys, birds, crocodiles, marine turtles, snakes and so on.
    You can only reach Nzulezo by boat.
    You can make your arrangements with the GHANA WILDLIFE SOCIETY in Beyin.

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    festivals

    by abdulwa Updated Dec 30, 2004

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    most people miss the festivals cause they sometimes postpone the dates for the festival due to tribal conflicts and the most that people miss about ghana when thet leave is the hospitality of its people.

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    Rice balls with peanut soup

    by Alpha_Ghana Written May 17, 2004

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    Another delicious Ghanaian dish, one of my favourite.
    They cook rice more than it should, in order that rice becomes like mash. Then, they make balls.
    They also prepare a peanut soup, wich remind me the sate sauce of the Thai food.
    You can also add some chicken or beef pieces and you have a delicious dish.

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    Alomo

    by Alpha_Ghana Written May 16, 2004

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    Go to any of the local bars and ask for Alomo.
    It looks like Campari and tastes as bitter as Campari, with the same colour.
    It is made of local herbs.
    We use to mix it with beer.

    This is one of the Ghanaian real aphrodisiacs!

    I could not believe when it became true.
    If you drink two-three glasses of this alcohol, don't be alone!
    I tested it several times because I thought it was a coincidence, but it really works even if you don't want.

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    Kenkey

    by Alpha_Ghana Written May 16, 2004

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    Another Ghanaian food is kenkey. It is a pastry made of mash corn and sold in corn leaves.
    You eat it with dry fish or saucy meat, or like you want.
    It is very cheap, 2000 cedis and if I eat one, I have enough for the day.

    I did not know the diet of my dogs, but I was surprised my house girl was asking so little money for dog food. In fact, she was giving them two balls of kenkey (one ball is the size of a fist) each. She was cutting them into dices and soaking them into fish or meat juice.

    In Ghana, with less than one Euro, you eat and drink for one day.

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    Fufu

    by Alpha_Ghana Written May 16, 2004

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    Fufu is the traditional dish of Ghana.
    Fufu is a kind of pastry you made of cassava leaves and plantain.
    Cassava leave is a kind of spinash and plantain is a kind of banana.
    They make a flour out of them.
    Women mash that with water in a heavy wooden bowl, with a long heavy wooden stock.
    They serve it with hot pepper soup.
    This food is very heavy.

    You have to eat it on the Ghanaian way:

    First you wash your hands on the table, then you eat with your right hand (it is very inpolite to eat with left hand). In West Africa, you only eat with three fingers.
    You make a small dice of fufu and soak it in the soup then eat it.
    The soup usually contains fish or/and goat meat.
    After, you wash your hands and rest, you are too full and cannot move.

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