Safety Tips in Ghana

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Most Viewed Warnings and Dangers in Ghana

  • Wafro's Profile Photo

    Bush meat

    by Wafro Written Jul 2, 2005

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    Bush meat, you can find it everywhere.
    At local markets, in chop bars and along the road.
    Use your brains and don’t buy it if it’s possible, otherwise you support the killing of wild animals.
    Sometimes it’s easier to find animals along the road, than in the wild.
    -Monkeys
    -Snake
    -Grascutter
    -Antelope
    -….

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  • Wafro's Profile Photo

    Don't get angry.

    by Wafro Updated Jun 22, 2004

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    During your journey you'll probably get into situations where you can lose your patience.
    That's mainly because of the cultural differences and than you'll have to control yourself.
    Ghanaian our relaxed and polite people and you'll lose all your credits when you become angry and aggressive.
    SO RELAX AND GO WITH THE FLOW.

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  • Alpha_Ghana's Profile Photo

    Malaria

    by Alpha_Ghana Updated May 13, 2004

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    Malaria is still very dangerous in Ghana and a lot of people die every year because of this infection.
    If you come to Ghana, particularly from May to October, during the raining season, don't forget your malaria tablets.
    Consult a tropical practitionner, because the malaria infection creates new defenses every year and one medication valid one year can be obsolete the year after.
    The best is prevention, after 5PM, always wear clear clothes and be fully covered, especially legs and feet, use strong mosquito repellants.

    Be aware that there is no 100% safe anti-malaria tablet, so never take the strongest because if you yet get malaria, there is nothing stronger.

    In Ghana, there is a good medecine called HALFAN 90,000 cedis in all pharmacies. This cares you the three-four first times you get malaria, after you must choose another one.
    After fever is gone, two-three days later, take a lot of vitamines and don't eat fat, don't drinl alcohol during at least 15 days. Don't do anything that can give difficulties to your lever.
    The you can recover fast.

    You perhaps have malaria if you feel:
    - throat pain like a serious flu
    - body pain and tired
    - headache like BP down

    Fever comes a little bit later but if you feel you have malaria, go to the hospital and make a test, if not possible take tablets.

    Not caring maliara is very dangerous and you can die.

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    Forests are disappearing

    by Wafro Written Jul 3, 2005

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    Timber once was a number one export product of Ghana.
    Now that many forests have been cleared, the export of tropical hardwood has declined.
    But you can still see the trucks loaded with big logs driving around the southern part of the country.

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  • Alpha_Ghana's Profile Photo

    Swimming

    by Alpha_Ghana Written May 13, 2004

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    Swimming under the hot sun of Ghana is very nice, however don't do it any where.
    It is always better to go in the swimming pools.

    Rivers and lakes: be careful, a lot of rivers have billiardhozis.

    Sea: the waves and particuklarly the subwaves can be very dangerous. never swim where it is not allowed and monitored.

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  • Alpha_Ghana's Profile Photo

    Information on you.

    by Alpha_Ghana Written May 28, 2004

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    You think if you protect your money and your expensive goods, you won't have problem.
    In fact, everything has a value, even your business card.
    People can steal or ask you your business card. They sell it to a 419er or a Nigerian scammer, who is going to write to you and tell he has millions dollars to share with you.

    So, be careful when you give a business card and do like for your cheques: number them and know to whom you are giving them.

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    Beware of pick-pockets

    by grets Written Jan 21, 2007

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    Many places in urban Ghana can be crowded to the extreme and you could very easily fall victim to pick-pockets. Although Ghana is not a dangerous place per se, take care of your belongings - don’t leave wallets sticking out of your back pocket for instance. It only takes one bad apple to seize the opportunity and then disappear in the crowd. You’d have no chance of following or ever finding them again.

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    Begging

    by grets Written Jan 21, 2007

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    Many places where tourists frequent, the children, will beg for money, pens or sweets. Please do not give directly to the children as you do not want to encourage begging. If you want to help, give a donation to the village elder or a school.

    Sometimes the children will ask for your used water bottle. This is OK to give, as long as there are not two water bottles and fifty children, as it will cause a fight.

    The older children and adults are more crafty in their approach, and will make friendly opening questions such as ‘where are you from?’, ‘what’s your name?’ etc, but the end result is usually the same: a request for a gift or some money. By all means engage in conversation - some of my best memories from Ghana are talking to the local people - most of them will happily continue talking to you even if you don’t give them anything.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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  • MissThing606's Profile Photo

    Beware of the drivers

    by MissThing606 Written Oct 2, 2004

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    Ghana is a great place to visit - just beware of the arrogant drivers.

    You may think that once you are in the middle of a quiet road any onciming vehicle will slow down and let you pass, right? UH-uh, wrong!

    As far as some of these drivers are concerned, the road is for vehicles. therefore if you happen to get hurt while they are in the road, that's your business!

    This isn't an exaggeration. I was crossing a road once, there road was clear till I got to the middle of the road. Then this car comes speeding round he corner beepign his horn and the driver motions for ME to get out of his way!

    Another time, my Dad and I were on a zebra crossing Osu (honestly, those things are just there for deocration!) when these two guys come past on a moped and shout and insult us. They sped past, just inches from my dad's face!

    Granted, not all drivers are like this, but be careful!

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    Ghana. Always consult Medical Travel Specialist

    by Odinnthor Written Oct 21, 2009

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    Always, ALWAYS, consult a travel medicine specialist before you go. Do not assume that your doctor is qualified to give advice on travel medical issues. I believe you will need a yellow fever and cholera inoculation and you should inform yourself regarding malaria medicine needs, mosquito repellents and such. You need to do this at least 5-6 weeks prior to departure. You will need to provide a certificate proving those vaccinations. Malaria shot is also recommended, however ask your travel medicine specialist for proper procedures.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel

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    Malaria

    by Pieter11 Written Mar 6, 2007

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    If you are going to Ghana and especially when you are planning to spend a long time there, be prepared that nothing will stop you from having Malaria. Of course you should take your Malaria-medecines, wear mosquito repellant when the insects come out after sunset, and you should sleep under a mosquito net when there are mosquito in the room you are sleeping in.

    But then again, you will get bitten anyway, and then the risk is very high that you will get sick. Therefore, be very careful when you are not feeling well: fever, sickness, tiredness and a lack of appetite are some of the signs. When you are feeling like that, better go to the hospital immediately.

    In Ghana they are very generous with medecines and they will give you the Malaria medecines easily. But better to take these pills when there is nothing wrong with you, than to ignore it and wait until you have to spend some day in the hospital with an infuse in your arm.

    Sorry for the scary talk, but my experience is that under people who spend at least 2 months in Ghana, at least 50% gets Malaria.

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  • abdulwa's Profile Photo

    malaria

    by abdulwa Updated Dec 30, 2004

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    well ghana has no threat to tourist expect for the petty thieves and malaria.you have to be on guard for malaria.
    also look out for thieves at the tema station area and the lorry parks.also at the outskirts of makola market.also beware of the thieves at the beaches.

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    Water shortages and cuts

    by grets Written Jan 21, 2007

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    Water shortages and cuts are common and in many hotel bathrooms were buckets that you were advised to fill at any opportunity you happened to have running water. Which in some places wasn’t very often. Many a time we had cold bucket showers, but they are very refreshing after a hot, dusty walk in the savanna.

    Often when we got in to a hotel and turned on the tap there was nothing coming out. You just have to keep trying until something does. When you do get water, you are lucky to get hot water.

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    Road conditions

    by grets Written Feb 7, 2007

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    Many of the roads in Ghana are not paved and some are really no more than dirt tracks. There are lots of pot holes, and we were there in the dry season, so I should imagine it get a whole lot worse in the wet season. Allow more time than you think it will take, even to travel short distances. There are also many road works, as well as road checks by traffic police. We must have been stopped two or three times AT LEAST, every single day by police checks.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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  • atufft's Profile Photo

    Malaria

    by atufft Updated Oct 5, 2007

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    Early explorers and missionaries, including the Great Egyptologist, Belzoni, died soon after arrival in Ghana. Today, the traveler's risk of dying by dysentary is low, and most other health risks can be vaccinated. The sole threat remains malaria, an illness spread by mosquitoes.

    Authorities prescribe prophylatics a month before, during, and for a month after the trip, unless it will last more than several months. Prophylatics for malaria are not a vaccine but act to combat reproduction of malaria cysts in the blood. Mosquitoes detect humans by respired CO2, but less than 10% of mosquitoes carry malaria.

    Ghana physicians at government clinics easily diagnose malaria. My wife disliked the nauseating side effects of the prophylatics, and stopped taking them. In Kumasi, she fell ill. I rushed her to the hospital, a dingy institution by USA standards. Crowded with patients, records were kept on index cards, banded and boxed, but Belinda was rushed to the doctor. By her report the doctor ruled out malaria, but took a blood sample anyway. We filled his prescription at a private pharmacy, as the hospital pharmacy was not stocked. After 35 days on the road in West Africa, my wife and I returned home healthy.

    We are not medical experts but suggest the followng. First, use a DEET clothes wash kit to treat a set of clothes before leaving home. Second, use a 50% DEET lotion to stop mosquitoes from landing on the skin. Third, wear long sleeves and pants, especially at night. Fourth, and most importantly, since being biten at night during sleep is very common, stay in hotels with air-conditioning. Most towns in Ghana have at least one hotel with A/C, which eliminates a habitat of stable, hot, humid air that mosquitoes need and disperses/evacuates respired CO2. If the traveler is on a very tight budget, or if no a/c is available, a good fan near the bed can help, but then sleep in a mosquito net. Fifth, avoid spending time about the open sewers common in the cities.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Eco-Tourism

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