Malindi Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by anders1975
  • Things to Do
    by Squinchez
  • Things to Do
    by Squinchez

Best Rated Things to Do in Malindi

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    vasco da gama point

    by call_me_rhia Written Nov 19, 2003

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    vasco da gama point

    This is the point where the Portuguese seaman Vasco da Gama laid his anchor in Kenya - after he had been turned away from Mombasa. People here welcomed him with open arms. There is now a simple white-washed pillar as a monument to mark the spot where he landed. It's along the seafront - after Malindi's beach - and you can reach it on foot easily - by following a narrown lane by the sea - or scrambling onto and along the ocean-front rocks. There are nice views from the monument.

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    The greatest place for snorkelling!

    by Squinchez Updated Jul 4, 2007

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    The Malindi Marine National Park

    Honestly this is the best place for diving and snorkelling, if you havent been here while in Mombasa then you havent seen nothing yet! Malindi marine Park and Reserve is endowed with magnificent resources such as fringing reefs, coral gardens in the lagoons, sea grass beds, mangroves, mudflats, high fish diversity, marine mammals (e.g. dolphins), Turtles and Shorebirds. The main biotopes of Malindi Marine Park include fringing and patch reefs distributed on the seaward edge of barracuda channels

    The Park and Reserve has features such as being easily accessible by road and air, hosting rich and relatively unaffected marine biodiversity, beautiful beach and warm water safe for swimming among other factors to achieve the objectives outlined above.

    Related to:
    • Water Sports
    • Beaches
    • Aquarium

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    Gedi Ruins

    by Squinchez Updated Jul 5, 2007

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    visit the Gedi ruins and finish by interacting with the locals from the nearby villages for traditional dance entertainment and i assure you when you leave the place,you will have acquired a wealth of knowledge. you can combine a visit to Gedi with a trip to Kipepeo butterfly farm next door.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Road Trip

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    where disability is not inability!

    by Squinchez Written Jul 5, 2007

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    I was amazed by the talented disabled craftsmen/women at the Bombolulu workshop. They produce these beautiful handcraft jewellery, handprinted textiles, wood carvings and leather crafts, atleast something to take home with you. Still at the Bombolulu workshop are 8 different cultural traditional homesteads that entertains its guest throught the day everyday.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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    the new market

    by call_me_rhia Written Nov 22, 2003

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    a fruits stall

    Malindi's new market looks everything but new: it's a long row of stalls selling everything and anything - in particular goods of practical nature. You can find cheap clothes and shoes, footballs, and all sorts of food that you's like. I especially liked the fruits' stalls - particularly because I did not recognise most of the fruits they were selling. There are two things that you won't find in this market: souvenirs and coffee. While the first seems reasonable - since it's not a tourist trap or attraction - the latter doesn't make sense. Keny produces excellent coffee - and Î know that Kenyan people drink coffee... still, the only one I could find was western instant coffee. Go figure.

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    the portuguese chapel

    by call_me_rhia Written Nov 22, 2003

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    the portuguese chapel

    One of the oldest buildings in town is the Portuguese chapel. It is a simple white-washed cubic building with a traditional makuti roof (whih is nothing else than a strw roof). Within the chapel's fence there's a small graveyard, dating to the 16th century, too - which provides a fascinating portrait of the history of this stretch of "Portuguese" coastline. The chapel's gates are normally closed - but if you want to visit it all you have to do is ask someone in the adjoining bar - and they'll fetch someone with the gate's key for you

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    the old mosque

    by call_me_rhia Updated Nov 28, 2003

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    the old mosque

    In the courtyard of the Juma'a Mosque you can see the remainings of the old mosque: some scattered old stones and parts of walls, a few simple graves and.. a pillar grave. This one is really beautiful - and ornated with some fine examples of stone carvings. It's really a lot more interesting than the mosque itself. However it's not quite allowed to walk up to the ruins (the grassy patch is a Muslim cemetery), so you'll have to take your photos from the distance

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    a walk on the coral reef

    by call_me_rhia Written Nov 22, 2003

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    a blue star fish

    When the tide is out, the coral reef is in! It's possible to walk out and about there and admire the fishes that have been trapped in holes and left behind by the tide. We saw corals of every shape and size, some tame water snakes, poisonous sea-urchins, colourful little fishes - and hundreds of star fishes. They were sooooo amazing: grey, red, brown, green, black and blue; these colourful ones are even more spectacular if you turn them around: their back colour is different. Some star fishes were standing still, others were of a different sort and moved like spiders. Very fascinating. See my travelogue for more pictures.

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    Gedi - National Museum of Kenya

    by croisbeauty Updated Aug 30, 2011

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    Entrance to Gedi museum
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    The location of Gedi is part of the National Museum of Kenya and the new complex was built right next to the historic sight in order to preserve some valuable and unique exibits. Furniture and other found object clearly indicating that inhabitants of Gedi must have been highly civilized people. The only confusing thing is that no written documents have been found, not even one written text over the remined buildings. I find it very strange.

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    Gedi - historic sight

    by croisbeauty Updated Aug 30, 2011

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    Gedi historic sight
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    Gedi is the only historic sights of a type I have visit in all of Kenya, in fact was surprised not to found many more. It is situated in approach to Malindi town, somwhere in the mainland and is impressive collection of ruined palaces, mosques and houses. In the 13th century Gedi was a bustling city, by the 19th century it had been abandoned. Whilst the reason for this abandonment is not entirely clear it is thought that attacks by local surrounding tribes were behind its downfall.
    The ruins were uncovered in the 1920s by the archaelogist Loiui Leakey.

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    Vasco de Gama pillar

    by muguruki Written Jan 23, 2008

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    Its worth taking a stroll along the beach to the Vasco de Gama pillar on the south side of the main bay in malindi. When I was there it looked like the pillar had recently been given a coat of white paint. To reach the pillar itself there is a main entrance on the road and in recent years it seems you now have to pay a charge where as once you could wander up to the pillar kwa bure.

    At low tide when these photos were taken it is possible to walk through a gap in the rocky peninsula that the pillar stands on to the beach to the south, which has much clearer water than the main bay which tends to become red with all the top soil that has run down the Gallana river.

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    Gedi - historic sight

    by croisbeauty Updated Aug 30, 2011

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    Gedi - Great Mosque
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    Unfortunatelly, there excist no written documents about Gedi and everything about this sights is pretty much unknown and mysteruous. Since there are remains of an big mosque the place was definately inhabited by the people who originally could have been Arabs or Indians.
    There are remains of an big palace to, which occupies around 900 square meters. The walls are built of random rumble and lime mortar and have a width of 30-60 cm.
    Roofs of the houses were flat, slightly inclined for drainage and usually surrounding by a parapet with opening and spouts for run off of rainwater.
    Who knows what has happened with this unknown civilisation.

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    the Friday's mosque

    by call_me_rhia Updated Nov 28, 2003

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    the Juma���a Mosque

    Many people in Malindi are Muslim, and the little town is home to twelve mosques. The most "noticeable" is just by the road coming in from Mombasa, but it's not the most important one - not the largest. The largest of which is Juma'a Mosque in the heart of the old town - sort of hidden away among houses and behind high walls: we were not allowed to visit it - I'm not sure if it was because it was Friday or else because we are not muslims. We could only steal a glimpse inside from the front door. This mosque has a bloody past: it was misused as a haven for slave trading until mid 1870's

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    Back to reality

    by anders1975 Written Sep 23, 2006

    The ancient ruins of Gede (also called Gedi) is a nice place to kill some hours. Here you'll find lots of monkeys, but most important the old Arab-African town of Gede. The ruins is considered one of the largest archaeological sites for studying an ancient Swahili town and among the few places maintained and conserved within a national park. The ruins are still used for traditional rituals. You'll walk among mosques, tombs and royal toilets, and you'll discover traces of the early slave trade. Around the village you'll find some 50 tree species and globally threatened birds. There's also a museum on site, but boring compared to the large outdoor site (which must also be considered a muesum).

    Related to:
    • National/State Park

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Malindi Things to Do

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