David Sheldrick Animal Trust - Elephant Orphanage, Nairobi

4.5 out of 5 stars 14 Reviews

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  • David Sheldrick Animal Trust - Elephant Orphanage
    by Dizzyhead
  • David Sheldrick Animal Trust - Elephant Orphanage
    by Dizzyhead
  • David Sheldrick Animal Trust - Elephant Orphanage
    by Dizzyhead
  • vanessamumbai's Profile Photo

    Only 1 hour for visiting

    by vanessamumbai Updated Jun 6, 2014

    When I was there in May 2014, the visiting hour was only 11-12 noon. Thank God we decided (without prior knowledge) to see the elephants before the Giraffe Centre. The hour long introduction to the elephants and explanation of the mission of the orphanage was interesting and informative. The elephants were adorable! A must for all families with children on the trip.

    There were no sign posting to this attraction along the road and our cab driver who is quite young had to stop to ask several people. 1 person pointed him in the wrong direction and he had the instincts to triple check the info.

    There was traffic congestion on the way to the orphanage and it took us twice the time to go than to come back. I would recommend seeing this place, the Giraffe Centre and the Safari Walk on a Sunday if possible to save unnecessary travel time.

    Our cabbie has been really helpful and we would gladly recommend him for such trips. His contacts are as follows :
    +254 710709023
    josphatchege11@gmail.com

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    • Family Travel

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  • chrissyms's Profile Photo

    Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Conservation

    by chrissyms Updated Aug 20, 2010
    Here come Kids
    3 more images

    A well worth trip is to the David Sheldrick Wildlife trust. If you are on Safari then you will see plenty of the wild herds of elephants later, but this will give you an insight into the problems these wonderful animals have to put up with. The orphans you see have all been victims of some catastrophy and the dedication of the staff in rehabilitating these creatures is amazing. The talks and explanations given by the staff are informative and its entertaining to see the antics of these troublesome fellows. But the real thing is that by visiting you will be contributing to a very good cause.

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    • Photography
    • Eco-Tourism

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  • boltonian's Profile Photo

    Elephant Orphanage

    by boltonian Updated Aug 10, 2010

    Does exactly what it says on the tin.

    If you go in the morning at around 10am, you get to feed the calf elephants.

    Donations help the program, have a look at the website.

    I didn't visit here due to lack of time, but was a very popular trip for those staying at my hotel.

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  • Josilver's Profile Photo

    Elephant orphanage

    by Josilver Written Oct 28, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A rescue and rehabilitation program is run by the David Sheldrick Wildlife trust. It is open for 1 hour every day between 11 and 12. Entry is by donation - $3-5 US is the recomended entry. The feeding of the baby elephants was the highlight of my Nairobi visit.

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    • National/State Park

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  • K.Knight's Profile Photo

    VISIT THE DAVID SHELDRICK WILDLIFE TRUST 2.

    by K.Knight Written May 11, 2008
    At play.
    1 more image

    Buy an elephant! Or at least sponsor one...

    Known by just about everybody in Nairobi as "The Elephant orphanage," The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust is a must see when visiting Nairobi.

    Anne and I spent a magnificent 3 hours with the beautiful elephants, not leaving before we parted with a meagre US$50.00 to sponsor "LEMPAUTE" for 12 months.

    As their website advises... "A gift that not only helps save a life but also bequeaths to the recipient an endearing icon that will be both educational and appealing. This is a living gift of a wonderful animal, the largest mammal on earth, and a gift that enables someone to become a part of the life of the elephant of your choice."

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  • K.Knight's Profile Photo

    VISIT THE DAVID SHELDRICK WILDLIFE TRUST 3.

    by K.Knight Updated May 11, 2008
    Lempaute
    1 more image

    We sponsored Lempaute..

    “Lempaute" as her rescuers have named her after the area she was found, is just two weeks old and absolutely tiny. The scouts of The West Gate Conservancy were on a routine foot patrol when they came across this tiny calf walking all alone down a road. The moment she became aware of their presence she ran off into the bush screaming, but then later emerged from the undergrowth and began to follow them. She followed them as they walked for about an hour until such time as the patrol vehicle which was summoned by radio from the Head Quarters of the Conservancy was able to collect them and rescue the elephant. There were no elephants anywhere in the area, and her ears were very sun burnt which would indicate that she had been without her mother for at least 24 hours. She was rescued on the migration route the elephants use in the wet season as they transit through from Laikipia to the Mathews Range and it is suspected she was left behind simply because she could not keep up with the herd.

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  • K.Knight's Profile Photo

    VISIT THE DAVID SHELDRICK WILDLIFE TRUST 1.

    by K.Knight Written May 11, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Can I keep him?
    2 more images

    If you only have time to do one thing in Nairobi....DO THIS!

    The most important thing in the world to a baby elephant is its mother and its extended family. In infancy, the family lost to the orphaned elephants must be replaced by a human equivalent. Human Elephant Keepers replace the lost family and are with the babies 24 hours a day, travelling with them as a group during the day, and sleeping alongside them within their night stable at night, in physical contact at all times.

    TO DO THIS IS VERY EXPENSIVE! Every dollar raised from the sponsorship program goes toward the running of this centre.

    As Daphnie Sheldrick asks….

    "Please help us help an orphaned elephant by fostering one of the orphans directly through our website as a gift of life"

    What I say is, go and experience all that this centre has to offer and sponsor an elephant for US$50.

    http://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org/asp/fostering.asp?G=0

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  • sachara's Profile Photo

    Elephant orphanage

    by sachara Updated Nov 8, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    orphanage

    It was nice to see the baby elephants with their keepers at feeding time.That´s the only moment visitors are allowed to visit the orphanage.

    You can get a lot of information about the Davids Sheldrike Wildlife Trust. There are newsletters and booklets for sale. It´s also possible to adopt an elephant orphan. So we adopted Tomboi, rescued in the Samburu National Park. Back home we get regularly newsletters by e-mail. Meanwhile Tomboi is allready moved to the Tsavo NP to go back into the wild wthin some time.

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    • National/State Park

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  • sachara's Profile Photo

    Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, elephant orphanage

    by sachara Updated Nov 8, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    orphanage

    At the south side of the National Park you can visit the elephant orphanage around midday. There were also a lot of schoolchildren around. Just at the moment we arrived the little baby elephants came out of the bushes for their feeding and mudbathing. There was also a baby rhino around.

    The baby elephant orphans were rescued in different parks all over the country. When they are old enough they go back to the wild in the Tsavo Park.

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    • Eco-Tourism

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  • Zanzibargirl's Profile Photo

    David Sheldrick Animal Trust

    by Zanzibargirl Written Jul 14, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    David Sheldrick Elephant Feeding Time

    See young orphaned animals being reared in as close to their natural environment as possible. For more detail, see my photos on my travelogue... however... just for some quick insight, you can get up close and personal and touch a baby elephant and see them suckle a bottle, roll in the mud and over each other. A great organisation, protecting wildlife especially those short in number. They have rare creatures as well. When I was there there was a baby black rhino. A rare sight to see. Definately worth a look.

    Open for 1 hr. Daily from 11:00 am only.

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  • diosh's Profile Photo

    Baby ,orphaned elephants at Sheldrick's sanctuary.

    by diosh Written Jun 8, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    baby orphaned elephant

    Visited the sanctuary set up by David Sheldrick,who rescued orphaned,baby elephants.Wonderful experience to watch their keepers feeding them,whilst sheltering them from the sweltering sun with umbrellas!
    We spotted the baboons,in the nearby shrubbery,waiting for the mealtime to be over,so they could pinch what was left over!
    The tiniest baby elephant walked over to me and snuzzled against my leg!He stood about 2 feet high and still had difficulty contolling his trunk,he was so young! An image to remember!

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  • Krumel's Profile Photo

    The Elephant Orphanage

    by Krumel Written Apr 14, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Baby Elephant at the Nairobi Orphanage

    Daphne Sheldrick runs this shelter for orphaned elephants, which can be only be visited for an hour every day between 11am and noon. During this hour the baby elephants are brought out to play and to feed, and visitors can watch them from behind a rope. Wardens are on hand to explain the work of the orphanage and to answer any questions.

    To be sure they are open and to ask for directions it is advisable to ring before making your way to the orphanage.

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  • niamey00's Profile Photo

    David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust

    by niamey00 Written Jan 15, 2004
    baby  rhino with his surrogate mother

    David and his wife Daphne were pioneers in raising orphaned black rhinos and elephants and reintroducing them into the wild. The trust was established after David's death in 1977.
    Rhinos and elephants are still raised on site and there is an interesting presentation with the surrogate "mothers."
    Admission is free, but donations are strongly encouraged for such a worthy cause.

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    • Zoo
    • Photography
    • National/State Park

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  • littlebush's Profile Photo

    Not alot

    by littlebush Updated Feb 16, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Theres not alot to do in Nairobi but 2 afternoons out can include :
    The elephant orphanage - $10 to see orphaned elephants getting friendly.
    The giraffe Santuary - $10 - i never went(was hungover), but is meant to be really good, getting real close to giraffe.

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