Masai Mara Game Reserve Warnings and Dangers

  • Warnings and Dangers
    by samitbabu
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by samitbabu
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by samitbabu

Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Masai Mara Game Reserve

  • samitbabu's Profile Photo

    An animal alone is a threat !!!

    by samitbabu Written Nov 22, 2011
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    Any one of the predators or large animals alone is a threat. Do not v
    These includes but not limited too:enture too close or try to attract its attention by unwanted movement or sound.
    Lion
    Hippoes
    Rhinoes
    Buffalo
    Elephant
    Wildebeest

    Out of these, the Buffalo, the Elephant and Rhinoe being the most dangerous !!!

    The reason is that when one is alone it always feels insecure at the sight of humans and is more prone to attack at the slightest cause. Comparatively, a herd or group or family always adds to their sense of security .

    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • National/State Park
    • Safari

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  • samitbabu's Profile Photo

    Lions and the hot sun

    by samitbabu Updated Nov 21, 2011
    The Lion avoiding the Sun too  :)
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    Game viewing during the day has this danger ...the sun burning your skin around the faces, neck and upper chest.
    Please apply sunscreen lotion as required or keep under the shades as in picture.
    :)

    Rainy seasons like April to June and October November requires Anti Malarial Tablets .

    Related to:
    • Safari
    • Birdwatching
    • Jungle and Rain Forest

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  • Suet's Profile Photo

    Heat and baboons

    by Suet Updated Jan 8, 2010

    You need warm clothes to brave the Mara morning. Fleeces will just about do it, wear a T shirt, a light jumper and a waterproof coat. This will be necessary if you travel in the long and short rains period. Stop you chilling and getting wet. A hat is essential. It keeps you warm in the early mornings and shaded when the sun comes up. SUNBLOCK. This is your major packing item, you are on the Equator, the sun is at its strongest. Plaster yourself with it, mainly face and arms in the morning, but if you take to the pool in the afternoon, get the highest factor you can get and waterproof. Personally, I have many an expat friend who has eyelid, nose and shoulder cancer through excessive exposure to the sun. Please cover up and wear a hat at all times.

    Baboons and monkeys. Keep your windows and tents closed at all times. Monkeys are inquisitive, resourceful and bandits. I had a big male baboon in my room who ran off with my earplugs and the bill. They also got into my car at Nakuru and stole my wellies thinking there was something to eat. Keep you room closed, your car closed and keep no food in either.

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  • georeiser's Profile Photo

    Elephants are dangerous

    by georeiser Written Oct 4, 2009
    Edward Harrison's memorial in Masai Mara
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    Elephants are dangerous and cause 75% of human deaths from wildlife. The british tourist Edward Harrison from Rugby, Warwickshire, was trampled to death by an elephant right outside his camp in Oloolaimutia village in August 2000. According to the guide he took pictures and was too close the elephant before it attacked him. A memorial is raised on the place off this accident.

    Related to:
    • Safari
    • Arts and Culture
    • National/State Park

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  • Krumel's Profile Photo

    Minibus invasion

    by Krumel Updated Nov 9, 2008
    Tour buses crowd around a cheetah

    It's not really a danger, but more of a nuisance, but as the Mara is one of Kenya's most popular parks with the largest variety of wildlife, it inevitably also attracts large numbers of visitors.

    A car parked somewhere invariably attracts all other vehicles in the area, as they assume that you must be looking at something interesting, if you're stopping. Unfortunately some drivers place their clients' interests ahead of the animals' interests, and I have repeatedly seen vehicles blocking a for example a cheetah's path so that the tourists can get a good photo shot, or driving so close up to a leopard that it felt hassled and disappeared again in the bush.

    Related to:
    • Safari
    • Photography

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  • Krumel's Profile Photo

    State of the roads / tracks

    by Krumel Written Nov 9, 2008
    Patches of tarmac between the potholes :-)
    3 more images

    Especially during the rainy season the tracks in the Mara can be difficult to negotiate. While the main tracks are usually ok, it can be difficult to go on some of the smaller tracks that crisscross the park without risking to get stuck in a mudhole somewhere.

    Also the "road" from Narok to the Mara is not in the best condition, and as you can see on the main photo, you actually have to search for the tarmac in between the potholes.

    Especially people with back problems should be warned that it can be a rather long and bumpy ride!

    Related to:
    • Safari

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  • dgines's Profile Photo

    Wildlife Safety

    by dgines Written Nov 17, 2007

    - Wild animals are very dangerous not matter how small and/or cute
    - Listen to the camp staff and guides
    - Do not wonder off on your own without a guide - even to your tent. After retiring at night, don't leave your tent
    - Observe animals silently and with minimum disturbance
    - Never attempt to attract an animal's attention
    - Do not feed or approach any wild animal on foot
    - Do not use your cell phone or smoke on game drives

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  • Homanded's Profile Photo

    Bathrooms - FEW and FAR between

    by Homanded Written Nov 19, 2006

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    There are no bathrooms in the trails while on Safari. The only possible exception is the stop at the Mara river where there is a system of unisex (shared) outhouses which are primitive at best.
    Take this under consideration as you will be on the road for at least 2-3 hours at a time and you should consider your personal bathroom habits against your water intake.

    Give the choice, proper hydration is A MUST in Africa and all attempts at keeping yourself properly hydrated should be a requisite!

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  • Homanded's Profile Photo

    Brush your teeth with Bottled Water!

    by Homanded Written Nov 18, 2006

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    Use only bottled water to brush your teeth!
    Do not rinse your mouth out with tap water. Although lodges will tell you that some of their systems utilize filtration methods to get their water, don't trust it.
    A bad case of dysentary will quickly ruin your vacation! Best to be safe than sorry.

    NOTE: Once inside the park, you're not allowed to leave your vehicle meaning that if you're in a group of people and you suddenly have the "urge" you will have no place to go other than your pants.
    Groups look down upon a driver having to make a hurried turn around and rush back to the lodge because of ONE person's carelessness to heed such a simple warning - especially if you're in the process of watching lions feed in the wild!
    You're liable to be sacrificed to the beasts! he he he.

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  • Homanded's Profile Photo

    No photography w/out permission

    by Homanded Written Nov 3, 2006

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    Our instinct, as tourists to a new place may be to photograph the local people going about their business in a natural setting.
    People in Kenya can get really P*SSED off about this - as some in our group found out!

    Not having read the book on etiquette, as I had, nor, giving me the opportunity to explain what I had read about here on VT, one of the women decided to "snap off" a shot or two of a harmless looking Masaai child on the road side tending to his goats.
    We were quickly pelted with rocks and various other flying missiles as our driver made a hasty retreat.

    It was only after we'd been left looking back in astonishment that the verbal reprimand came.
    DO NOT photograph the Masaai w/out permission. You'll have plenty of opportunity, once you pay your $20 bucks in admission fees to the "Authentic" Masaai village!

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  • Homanded's Profile Photo

    Only bottled water!!!

    by Homanded Written Nov 3, 2006

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    Do not use regular tap water - even for brushing your teeth.

    Thankfully, any reputable tour operator as welll as lodge/accomodation will provide sufficient bottled drinking water for your comsumption. If not, bottled water is readily available at a minimal price throughout Kenya.
    Use bottled water even for brushing your teeth and rinsing!

    Careful when eating fresh vegetables and salads as well.
    Eat only fruit which you can peel or have been peeled for you.

    We never once had any problems in Kenya but we followed the above rules. Additionally, we avoided ice cubes "just in case" - although assured they used filters for making their ice.
    A bad case of dysentary can quickly ruin your vacation!

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  • Homanded's Profile Photo

    Pot Holes - Bumps and Bruises!

    by Homanded Written Nov 3, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I've driven in and ridden on some bad roads in my life but nothing - NOTHING could prepare me for the roadways leading into and out of the major parks throughout Kenya.
    It is a shame really, as the goverment seems to take road ways for granted spending little if any money in their repairs.

    Pot holes, debris and road side hazards are something to avoid rather than a rarity.
    We'd have to make unscheduled stops just to rest in between the justling that most of us were made to endure in the long drives in between parks. Perhaps this is why some tour operators and guests choose to do fly-in safaris rather than the more innexpensive option of driving in.
    What should've taken 3 - 4 hours often times took up to 6 hours of difficult journey. I have been told that during certain times of the year, some of the roads are also impassible due to the rains.
    Kenya should get it's act together and invest money on improving the road systems throughout the country.

    Not for the faint of heart nor people with bad backs or suffering from motion sickeness!

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  • BorneoGrrl's Profile Photo

    Don't go off the trail

    by BorneoGrrl Written Jul 6, 2006

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    Lots of tyre tracks

    You may get excited when you see the animals in the wild so sometimes, you want to get a closer look. There were some vans that go off the vehicle trail or path and go on the grass to get closer to the animals. This is not allowed because this will leave more unnecessary tyre tracks all over the area

    Related to:
    • Safari
    • National/State Park

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  • BorneoGrrl's Profile Photo

    Wear proper shoes in the Maasai Village

    by BorneoGrrl Updated Jul 5, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Maasai people walking though the cow shed

    When visiting the Maasai village, try to wear covered shoes because YOU WILL step into cow dung. The Maasai use cow dung to build their houses and sometimes, you have to walk through the place where they keep the cattle. Well, if you don't have a problem with it, by all means go with a sandal.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park

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  • Myndo's Profile Photo

    Masai

    by Myndo Written Jan 2, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Masai

    This is not supposed to be a general warning of the people here. They are generally quite friendly, especially if they feel they can sell you something. They are very used to tourists and quite the businessmen. So the will show you their village ? for 10-15 Dollar you can get it -including a demonstration of their dances and a visit to a hut and of course the possibility to buy some of their souvenirs: necklages etc.

    Never ever try to make a picture of one without permission. Not only they will get very angry and will make you pay for it. Much. Shoot out of a driving car and you are apt to get stones and sticks thrown at it.

    Some of the masai are very good looking and they do a lot for it: they wear makeup in red and black, do their hair in fine braids, wear yewellery of tiny pearl on the neck, the ankles, the wrists on the head and on the clothes. Classically they wear red clothes or at least with much red in it. The feet are bare or they wear sandals, sometimes made of old tires.

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