Lesotho Warnings and Dangers

  • Warnings and Dangers
    by shavy
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by shavy
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by shavy

Lesotho Warnings and Dangers

  • The four wheel drive

    We have known before coming here that self drive is not available to the mountain of Lesotho. Especially we only rent a regular car to drive around South Africa. And going up to Lesotho is out of our self drive tourWe have arranged this trip and book online before arriving in Africa. We booked the accommodation below in Underberg. We stay in Sani...

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  • The road to Lesotho

    Lesotho is made up mostly of highlands where many of the villages can be reached only on horseback, by foot. During the winter shepherds wearing only boots and wrap-around blankets have to contend with snowWhile much of the tiny country, with spectacular canyons and thatched huts, remains untouched by modern machines, developers have laid down...

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  • Beware: the sun is very strong at high...

    Again, a warning against something so obvious that I hesitate to mention it ...As you will hear time and time again, Lesotho is the highest country in the world, and with altitude, the sun - and most particularly the UV component - becomes stronger. It's therefore essential to make sure that you take adequate precautions to make sure that you don't...

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  • Lesotho's roads: not for the faint...

    Let's start with the positive: Lesotho is the perfect place for a challenging, fascinating yet relatively affordable road trip. Lesotho offers the highest mountain pass in Southern Africa (the Tlaeeng pass, at a literally breathtaking 3, 275m above sea level), the only vehicle pass over the Drakensberg (the highest mountains in the region) and...

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  • Don't take uninterrupted power supply...

    The Lesotho landscape has been changed forever by the construction of the massive Katse and Mohale Dams which comprise the first phases of the Lesotho Highlands Water Scheme. This scheme started construction in the early 1990s and indeed was the reason why I first visited Lesotho, as a few years previously, I had been involved in calculating the...

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  • Road trips are always slower than you...

    One of the challenges for those planning a road trip in an unfamiliar country is to realistically estimate what distances can be covered. This is particularly problematic in a country like Lesotho where the distances (and more importantly, travel times) between towns are large, and where there are few (if any) alternative places to stop en route if...

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  • Make sure your vehicle has sufficient...

    Much is written about the need to have a 4x4 in Lesotho, but in reality, what is at least as important as having four wheel drive is having a vehicle with sufficiently high clearance to avoid the sump busting potholes and boulders on the Kingdom's mountaneous roads and also has enough 'grunt' to cope with steep gradients, even when travelling at...

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  • The dirt road from Mokhotlong to Sani...

    So much attention is focused on the perils of the Sani Pass that few travellers spare a thought for the road from Sani Top to Mokhotlong on the other side. This is illadvised as this is a challenging piece of road in its own right, and one that you should not undertake lightly.The stretch of road from the tar road just outside Mokhotlong to Sani...

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  • Limited cellphone reception in the...

    This tip is full of blindingly obvious statements, but sometimes the things that we overlook - especially when travelling in an unfamiliar country - are the most obvious, so please forgive me if I seem to be insulting your intelligence.Firstly, Lesotho is a very mountainous place, and there are large areas of the country - particularly in the...

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  • Lesotho's road signage leaves a lot to...

    If you wanted to be charitable, you would say that Lesotho's road signage is not constrained by any lack of opportunity for improvement ... in other words, it's pretty hopeless!Signage on the few main roads is OK, but this isn't really where you need it: it's the tangle of back roads - such as that travelling north from Thaba Bosiu - that need...

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  • Beware of driving behind overloaded...

    Developing nations are renowned for overcrowded vehicles, and Lesotho is no exception: this is a random example spotted on the main road between Maseru and Teyateyaneng, where 13 adults were crammed into the back of a small bakkie (pick up truck). Technically this is illegal, but in reality, transport is hard to come by for most people and there is...

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  • Driving the Sani Pass? Don't forget your...

    The Sani Pass is the only way to cross the Drakensberg escarpment on Lesotho's eastern border with South Africa (which, interestingly enough, totally surrounds it) - thus, it is an international border, and you require a passport to cross from one to other. If you want to be pedantic, the pass itself is technically 'no man's land', as the Lesotho...

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  • FALLING ROCKS

    Most people usually ignore falling rock signs because they have never seen GIANT car sized rocks falling onto or rolling into moving vehicles. I have in America, but this place has some serious rock issues! Just look at the picture of the rock that fell into the road that is actually larger than my car. Physics dictates that you have to go slow...

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  • Kids and roads

    The kids are really cute but i was surprised to see them holding out their hands at any opportunity begging for moneyWhilst i fully understand they see tourists as money bags, i hadnt seen this process in any parts of south africathe roads can be poor and a 4WD is needed in some parts, read u first

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  • Ice and snow

    Be aware that during the winter season (June-July) it can be snowing here and very cold, especially at night, so be preparing with your planning and clothing.

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  • TENTSITE CHOICE

    When you camp in the upper Drakensberg it is advisable to bring all of your equipment inside your tent at night, leaving nothing outside or even in under the tent vestibule. Such practice should be employed even if you are not camping in the immediate vicinity of local herdsmen. Nothing like having your boots stolen at the midpoint of a week-long...

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  • Lesotho. Children begging.

    While one feels sorry for innocent-looking children begging at the side of the road, it is more kind not to stop. Hand-outs make these children dependant on charity and attracting them to the road-side poses a risk to their safety. With a growing sense of entitlement as a result of gifts, some children have begun to pelt cars with rocks when...

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  • Lesotho. Road conditions.

    Beware of animals on the roads. In the higher passes of the Maluti Mountains, ice can form on the road surface in winter, making it particularly slippery. In these conditions, animals straying onto the road can have fatal consequences!

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  • DAGGA SMUGGLING AND CATTLE RUSTLING

    Dagga (aka marijuana) is a big cash crop throughout southern Africa - KZN, the Eastern Cape, Lesotho and Swaziland. The drug is exported to Europe and North America as well as used domestically inside of South Africa. Dagga was outlawed as early as 1928, but its cultivation and usage continues. Economic opportunity in the Kingdom of the Sky (as...

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  • Dos & Don'ts

    These are from a pamphlet I picked up at the accomodation I was staying at (summarised):>Do weat a seatbelt while driving (duh)>Do be friendly - a smile and wave, especially when travelling through the countryside, will win many friends (I can attest to this one being true!)>Do inform the Headman or Chief if you are going to camp in his...

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  • Police checkpoints

    You'll often come across police checkpoints along the road, even along side roads. The cops are always friendly and helpful, and seem to be more interested in local vehicles and travellers. Only once did they ask for my licence and check the registration. The stop sign is placed about 100m before the actual checkpoint, the idea being that you stop...

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  • Begging kids

    Everywhere in Lesotho you will see kids begging next to the road. They're probably prompted by passers-by who ply them with sweets (and forget to give them dentist money as well). It's best not to give them anything, unless you're taking photographs or getting something from them in return.

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  • AIDS!

    Lesotho has got one of the highest HIV infection rates in the world, with estimation that one in three black Basutos have the virus today. Hence use prevention; else you probably play Russian roulette with a fully loaded gun.

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  • Extreme weather changes

    Extreme weather changes can stop you even for few days- snow falls, sand storms etc. You have to be prepared, food, water, warm clothes...

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  • When driving through the...

    When driving through the country, please take care and watch for large crowds, especially children, crossing the roads. You also have to look out for rush hour traffic in the countryside, which consists of slow moving carts pulled by donkeys!DRIVE SLOWLY AND CAUTIOUSLY!

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  • Don't give out sweets!!!

    The odds are that, especially in rural areas, you will be mobbed by kids asking for (sometimes demanding) sweets. Don't give them any!There is a persistent urban legend (rural legend?) that all foreigners have money and sweets, and will distribute them to anyone who asks.Not only is it bad for them, but it encourages them to do it to the next...

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  • Extreme weather changes

    It might be 30 degrees celsius in Himeville (South Africa) and -5 degress on top of Sani. Take some warm clothes as well as water proof clothes as well. Warning valid for ANY time of the year !

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  • Avoid strolling around at...

    Avoid strolling around at Maseru by night.Do not hike through villages by night, the dogs are very dangerous. They may think you are a cattle thief.Do not come to close to the Initations Schools in the Maloti Mountains.

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  • The weather on Lesotho's high...

    The weather on Lesotho's high plains changes faster than anyplace I've seen on earth, even faster than California's Sierra Nevada. It can be gloriously clear and sunny one moment, then clouds can race at running speed up the side of a cliff and within five minutes your fogged in for the next twelve hours. Be patient and prepared for anything.

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  • Why they do it I don't know,...

    Why they do it I don't know, but beware of youths next to the roadside, for they can all of a sudden throw some stones at you. Do not feed them by throwing sweets at them.Be on the lookout for stray animals when traveling on the roads.

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  • When I was there, there was a...

    When I was there, there was a lot of talk about rape from some of the female volunteers, and while such incidents did happen, they were infrequent and far between.What was of greater concern, at least to me, was occasional 'instabilities'. By that I mean that sometimes certain groups, be it the police or teachers, would stike, sometimes threatening...

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Lesotho Warnings and Dangers

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