Related Libya Favorites Tips

  • What was that you wanted to know?
    What was that you wanted to know?
    by TheWanderingCamel
  • Favorites
    by iwys
  • Favorites
    by TheWanderingCamel

Most Viewed Favorites in Libya

  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo
    3 more images

    What else?

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Feb 7, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Well it would have to be, wouldn't it?

    How could this Wandering Camel resist taking photos of the camels she saw along the way? Not that there were a lot, but they can be a hazard on the desert roads, so keep an eye out - and tell your driver to slow down - I think the average Libyan driver is born with lead in his accelerator foot!

    The white babies were especially appealing - and I wish I had been speedier with my camera and managed to get a shot of one of the several trucks I saw with three or four camels sitting in the back tray - all looking so disdainful.

    No, I didn't ride a camel (I'd had a fall a couple of days earlier in Tripoli and was still rather stiff) but the Tuareg saddles were interesting - and I was assured they were comfortable too because of the way they support your legs out in front of you .

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Desert

    Was this review helpful?

  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    What's for dinner?

    by TheWanderingCamel Written Feb 9, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: I just loved this fragment of mosaic in the museum at Sabratha, and the puzzle it poses.

    What can it have been made for? It clearly shows the ingredients of a recipe - some of which you can still see for sale on market stalls today in Libya - I saw bunches of onions and a tuberous vegetable that looked just like the ones here, though you would never see the pig's trotter or the other unidentifiable piece of offal now.
    Why would anyone go to all the effort of creating a mosaic - a very laborious and time-consuming task - for something so seemingly ordinary?

    So what do you think is the dish? My guess is for some sort stew but would it taste any good without the ingredients that are missing from the rest of the mosaic?

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • a2lopes's Profile Photo

    Escorted tours

    by a2lopes Written Oct 23, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: As you may know traveling in Libya it's not "free". That means that even if you enter the country with your own car you must ask special permission, they will give you (you buy) a Libyan license plate and you must have a local guide always.
    If you ave not your car and you want to travel between different places you can rent services from different companies but prices depend quite a lot on the companies.
    In a recent trip to Libya I enjoyed very much and was fully satisfied with the services of Mr Al Tayeb from
    Dan do Omer (phone 00218477863333; email dandoomer@yahoo.com)
    Fair prices and you can design your tour according to what you want (number of days in each place, etc.)
    Enjoy Libya

    Fondest memory: the country it's still "unspoiled" - that means still without hordes of tourist-, very much well preserved (ruins, etc), and the desert it's one of the best on earth.

    Related to:
    • Desert
    • Road Trip
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • queensali's Profile Photo

    ****************GHADAMES****************

    by queensali Written Jul 14, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Town and oasis in Libya, with 10,000 inhabitants, next to the borders of Tunisia and Algeria.
    Ghadames is recognised for its beautiful and inventive architecture, designed to fight the dramatic extremities of Saharan climate.
    All houses are made out of mud, lime, and palm tree trunks. They are constructed so that all fit together, with covered alleyways between them, and adjacent roofs, allowing passage from one house to another.
    While the entire population have moved out to the modern nearby village, the old one offers the only good shelter against summer heat, so that the old village is still popular to use.
    Earlier the town was an important stopover on the caravan routes crossing the Sahara. Today's income is from some camel breeding, a small agriculture as well as administrative and military activities.
    19 BCE: The Roman garrison Cydaus is set up, but the Romans found this a difficult post to hold.
    4-5th centuries: Cydaus becomes an episcopate under the Byzantine empire, and altogether 4 bishops served their mission here.
    667: Arab invasion. Uqba Bin Nefi stopped here on his way to Tunisia.
    8th century: Ghadames is established as an important trading point for caravans.
    16th century: Ghadames is set under the Bey of Tunis.
    1860: Ghadames is set under the Bey of Tripoli.
    1914: The Italians reach Ghadames, three years after starting the occupation of the rest of Libya. They are met with strong resistance.
    1924: Italians finally get control over Ghadames.
    1940: Ghadames is set under French control. Under World War 2, the old city is strongly damaged.
    1951: After strong pressure, the Tunisian protectorate gives Ghadames up to the newly independent Libya.
    1955: The last French troops leave.
    1986: Families start to move out of the old town for good.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Desert

    Was this review helpful?

  • Luchonda's Profile Photo

    Money and stamps

    by Luchonda Written Nov 3, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The money in Libya is the LD - stands for Libyan Dinar and is divided in 100 piaster and 1000 dirham.
    Paper : 1/4-1/2-1-5-10 and 20 dinar
    Coins : difficult to find - 1/4-1/2 dinar
    To give you an idea about the dinar value : 1LD= 0.60 Eurocent (2007)
    Water you can buy for : 1/2 dinar for 1.5 liter
    A traditional lunch (for tourists - from 15 till 20 dinar)

    Stamps : a must to buy in case you are a collector - they are colorful and you can get them in every post office or souvenir shops near the touristic sites

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • sachara's Profile Photo

    The green book of Muammar Gadhafi

    by sachara Updated Aug 21, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Muammar Gadhafi has elaborated a set of philosophies and published these in the so-called green book. I had heard of this book when I travelled in Ghana in the eighties, so I look for this green book in the towns when I came back from the desert trip and I found it in Sabha.

    The first part of the book is about the start of the era of the Jamahriyat, the state of the masses. The second part is about the economic revolution. The third part is about the social revolution, interesting stuff to read concerning subjects as the family, the tribe, woman, minorities, black people, education, music and art , sport and more.

    Since the game is over for Khadaffi's regime in summer 2011 it will be a weird collectors item.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • batman2000bc's Profile Photo

    Libya, which is as big as...

    by batman2000bc Updated Sep 12, 2002

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Libya, which is as big as Germany, France, Scandinavia and
    Holland put together, is the gateway to the Arab Maghreb,and
    the link between Europe and Africa .
    It also connects the desert to the sea ( the Gulf of sirt_'Africa's window on the world'), and is a country which, more than any other, has succeeded in remaining a virgin land.
    Capable of offering tourists with a passion for archaeology and love of adventure first_class hotel accommodation,
    impressive historical remains,unique landscapes, nature in all its glory, and striking contrasts.

    Fondest memory: The Arabs say:-
    (( If amazement is the first step to knowledge, our desert
    is amazement itself.))

    Was this review helpful?

  • Luchonda's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    Impression of a tourist like me.

    by Luchonda Updated Nov 17, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Lybya is a country to be visited. And tourism will grow rapidely, without doubt. But a lot of things are still to be done, in my opinion :
    - More excavations (untill now only 40% is shown)
    - Protection of the archeologic sites and musea (protect at least the floor mosaics)
    - Clean up the sites and in general, roads from all rubbish like plastics and even dead animals
    - Make clear logistic contracts for tourism. (remember the french tourists not allowed to get in because there was no Arabic translated copy of the passports)

    Fondest memory: Libya is a country to be visited and a rather recent touristic place, growing soon.
    Archeo top sites next to the mediterranian sea, maybe the best in the world. Impressive Berberian sites in the western area like Ghadames and Nalut.
    Another fondest memory, once strolling around in the souks, medinas or even in general the cities : friendly people and no aggresive vendors (Yet)

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Luchonda's Profile Photo
    3 more images

    Libya - why ?

    by Luchonda Updated Nov 7, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Archeologic sites in Tripolitania - Cyrenia coast and in the south-west, the berber civilization and their ancient traditions.

    Fondest memory: I visited many archeologic sites, small groups, mainly italian and german tourists and we (VTB)were alone, i had the impression the Libyans are not interested in their rich roman or greece imperial history. No archeo site is protected, you can cross the mosaic floors with no restrictions, even the national museum in Tripoli is not secured.
    The country itself, the landscapes are poluted by garbish, from west to east. Nobody of the locals cares. Even the gouvernment don't cares.
    Some "booming" cities like Tripoli and Benghazi should be renovated. Wherever the money comes from.(Libyans income from oil or gaz)

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Archeology
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • Luchonda's Profile Photo
    2 more images

    Respect the Islam religious traditions

    by Luchonda Updated Nov 18, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: No political statement, but i think we have to respect each other in their own country first, we in Arabic countries, but also them in our western countries.
    BTW Ghadaffi once said : "All moslims are welcome in Libya, wherever they come from."
    He now faces problems with incoming people searching for work and living facilities.
    Many street workers are claiming or offering a daily job. (Pic3)
    Don't we have the same scénary in Europe ?

    Fondest memory: It is a save country, not prepared for tourism yet and i hope a revival after the general boycot will be realised soon.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Luchonda's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    The bridge ....

    by Luchonda Updated Nov 6, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Builded by american engineers.But this is not the item.
    Travelling in Libya can be done in several ways. Mostly by a touristic bus (very comfortable in case the group members doesn't exceed 20persons)
    The tour from Tripoli to Benghazi can be done by plane (This was not the case 5 years ago). The tour from Tripoli to Sebha (Sahara) aswell.
    BTW : travelling by bus has still it's charms, you can visit local places, yes you get it, eg this bridge, crossing it by foot and at the end, buy some local fruits, honey or apples.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • queensali's Profile Photo

    LEPTIS MAGNA

    by queensali Written Jul 14, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: --- is one of the most extensive archaeological sites - is a World Heritage site on the Mediterranean coast of North Africa in the Tripolitania region of Libya, located on the coast 120 kilometres east of Tripoli. Originally founded by the Phoenicians in the 10th Century BC, it survived the attention of Spartan colonists, became a Punic city and eventually part of the new Roman province of Africa around 23 BCAs a Roman city it prospered, boasting Emperor L Septimius Severus as one of its sons and benefactors.
    Sacked by a Berber tribe in 523 AD it was abandoned and quickly reclaimed by the desert. Although it provided a source of building materials to various pillagers throughout history, it was not excavated until the 1920s.
    1997 will be largely a study season when the artefacts and other evidence can be examined to piece together answers to some of the intriguing questions this dig has raised - What happened to the 2nd/3rd centuries? Why did such a small house need extensive underground water cisterns?

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • queensali's Profile Photo

    ******************SABRATHA********************

    by queensali Written Jul 14, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Sabratha was to a large extent the one with least wealth, yet there are structures here that gives a lot of sense to the idea of visiting it. Sabratha was constructed in the 1st and 2nd centuries AD, but it did survive longer than its big brother, Leptis Magna. As is the case with many ancient cities in North Africa, it was the arrival of the Arabs, that resulted in the final decline.
    Much of the city was destroyed by earthquakes during the 4th century, particularly that which took place in 365 AD. A rebuilding programme followed but the city was now to occupy a much smaller area. The Vandals ruled in the 5th century but they were expelled under the Emperor Justinian and further building projects took place in the Byzantine era. Sabrata was to survive for a hundred years following the Arab invasion of the mid 7th century AD.

    The most spectacular site in Sabrata is the Theatre, probably built during the reign of the Emperor Commodus (161-192 AD), with its three-storey backdrop of columns. Other monuments and areas of interest include the Temple of Liber Pater, the Basilica of Justinian, the Mosaics of the House of Jason Magnus, the Capitolium, the Temple of Serapis, the Temple of Hercules and the Temple of Isis.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • cadzand's Profile Photo

    Video camera and photo camera

    by cadzand Updated Nov 17, 2005

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Be aware that on every historical site or in every museum you'll have to pay 5 Libyan dinar for taking pictures and 10 dinar for videofilm, even if the site is small as in Tochra. Some guardians are strict, others aren't..

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • queensali's Profile Photo

    CYRENE

    by queensali Written Jul 14, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: This site, located in the Gebel Akhdar region, was founded in the seventh century B.C. in an area where Carthaginian influence was predominant. From the fifth to fourth centuries B.C., this Greek trading post, situated inland, knew its most prosperous period and was able gain the goodwill of Alexander the Great, without falling under his sword.

    Cyrene, a city steeped in history and legends for a thousand years, is one of the most complex archaeological sites in the Mediterranean region. Like the other Greek cities of Libya it provides an outstanding example of prosperity in the Mediterranean and African worlds, whose attributes it managed harmoniously to combine.

    Monument after monument, the relics found by archaeologists illustrate an extremely clear aesthetic ambition and the religious fervour that inspired the people, focused on their protector, Apollo.

    The site of Cyrene, which has not yet been fully explored, contains some remarkable relics from the Greco-Roman period. Among the most important are:

    The Sanctuary and Temple of Apollo, the city's oldest cultural building. During the Imperial Roman era, from Trajan to Hadrian, the abundance of water from Apollo's spring led to the building of baths that contains the site's most impressive statues. The sanctuary included a large number of buildings -including temples, porticos and fountains.

    To the east, on a nearby hill, the Cyrenians built the biggest Greek Doric temple in Africa in the sixth century B.C. - the Sanctuary of Zeus, which is comparable to the Temple of Zeus at Olympia.

    Finally, the wealth of funerary monuments lends an unforgettable mood to the Cyrenian landscape. A major excavation project in the region has been proposed to the Libyan government by the University of Leicester. The aim of the project would be to identify the links existing between Cyrene and the surrounding area in ancient times.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

Libya Hotels

See all 18 Hotels in Libya

Top Libya Hotels

Tripoli Hotels
276 Reviews - 881 Photos
Ghat Hotels
2 Reviews - 16 Photos
Gharyan Hotels
2 Reviews - 14 Photos
Benghazi Hotels
68 Reviews - 327 Photos
Jibal Akakus Hotels
27 Reviews - 138 Photos

Instant Answers: Libya

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

97 travelers online now

Comments

Libya Favorites

Reviews and photos of Libya favorites posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Libya sightseeing.
Map of Libya