Unique Places in Morocco

  • Camel Market
    Camel Market
    by JessieLang
  • Aguelmane Sidi Al, Morocco
    Aguelmane Sidi Al, Morocco
    by EviP
  • Aguelmane Sidi Al, Morocco
    Aguelmane Sidi Al, Morocco
    by EviP

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Morocco

  • aussirose's Profile Photo

    Book your Desert Trip with Sahara Dreams Maroc

    by aussirose Updated Jan 30, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You must be convinced by now after reading my travelogues that a Sahara desert trip from Marrakech is a 'must do'!! :o)

    Well if you miss booking with Sahara Dreams Maroc.....then you may as well buy a crash helmet and find the nearest brick wall!! haha. .....So what are you waiting for?... link to the site is pasted below.

    We had the pleasure of meeting Hayat, the Administrator of the Company and who organised our wonderful trip. Hayat was very prompt in the emails that we exchanged and very polite. ....and in person, she was just so very nice! :o) Habib is a lucky fella to have such a warm and professional employee.

    aussirose meets Hayat - Sahara Dreams Maroc Sahara Dreams Maroc headquarters - Ouarzazate Sahara Dreams Maroc headquarters - Ouarzazate Sahara Dreams Maroc headquarters - Ouarzazate
    Related to:
    • Safari
    • Desert
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • angiebabe's Profile Photo

    3 or more day camel trips Zagora vs Merzouga

    by angiebabe Updated Nov 17, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    For me I would recommend choosing to do a 3-4 day trip like that in the Merzouga sahara desert area - the largest dunes are there - but both the Merzouga and Zagora areas do not really have what you are worrying about 'other camel safaris' and western civilisation to be much bother - they are big areas and in all the 7 years Ive been going there Ive so many times been the only foreigner wherever Ive been - or maybe Ive seen a couple of others or here and there a group on a bunch of camels - and Ive camped out there too a lot ot times - and also in that sort of time frame while you are out for 3 days youd probably be lucky to see another westerner - and actually where in the world can you guarantee that you wont

    - but the fact that getting to Merzougas dunes is so much easier and you can drive straight to the dunes where you can get on your camels and set off is a major advantage - going from Zagora is miles from the desert ie an hour and half by car to get to the end of the road at Mhamid and where erg Lehoudi which is a little desert area nearby that tourists go to camp overnight or do a short camel trip when they dont have time or budget to go the 40 km from Mhamid to the nearest dunes of Erg Chigaga.

    If you have a look at my hotel tips on my Merzouga and Morocco pages such as Riad Aicha and Hotel Nomade Palace - in Merzouga and Hassi Labied area - both are places that are along the long chain of Erg Chebbi dunes, I would recommend them to investigate and do a trip from their hotels with - they do good value camel trips and will do you a good price and good itinerary for that length of time - you will be able to see/go past bedouins who still live out way out in the desert and to oases and where its really beautiful out there.

    Also do a google to look up a desert music festival thats usually on at new year down there in the Merzouga desert which you might like to go to if the dates are right.

    For dune visits or camel trips in the Zagora/Erg Chigaga area if you look at my tip on Riad Malal in my Zagora page they have a good agency and are excellent people and would look after you wonderfully if you wanted to do a camel trip out from Zagora or from Mhamid.

    Merzouga dunes with beautiful sunset glow beautiful views of the dunes around Merzouga I love the desert around Merzouga!
    Related to:
    • Desert
    • Photography
    • Adventure Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Visit a real authentic Moroccan village near Fez

    by katie_nz Written Aug 23, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We stayed at the Dar KamalChaoui guest house in Bhalil which gives you a great opportunity to get an insight into everyday life in the old small Moroccan village. Kamal and his wife Beatrice have a beautifully decorated guest house in Bhalil that we loved. It is decorated with beautiful moroccan crafts and stunning Moroccan tadelakt kitchen and bathroom.

    When we arrived we were brought freshly made watermelon juice and biscuits and our room was upgraded as we were the only ones staying in the guesthouse. This also meant we were the only tourists in Bhalil which was a pretty unique and amazing experience. Kamal took us on a free tour of Bhalil introducing us to others in our village, including having a tea in a cave house! Some of the locals live in caves in the rock which they have decorated to be beautiful homes. You can see the local women sewing buttons, or cracking open dried broad beans in the streets. Kamal's enthusiasm and passion for Bhalil is contagious and our experience at Bhalil was my favourite of our three week trip to Europe and Morocco. The relaxed atmosphere was perfect after staying in crazy Fez (which we also thoroughly enjoyed for different reasons). He speaks great English (also many others including Arabic, French, German..) so he was able to translate for us and we were able to have many interesting discussions and learn so much from him.

    If your going to Fez and love to get off the tourist track and learn about and experience new cultures I’d 100% recommend visiting Bhalil and staying at Dar Kamal Chaoui.

    From the Roof terrace at Dar KamalChaoui in Bhalil Typical street in Bhalil
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Bennytheball's Profile Photo

    Moroccan tout spotting for beginners.......

    by Bennytheball Updated Aug 23, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    During my many travels in Morocco I have encountered a significant number of distressed travellers having fallen victim to the venal touts and other street lowlife. The touts fall into many diverse categories e.g. drug dealers, child beggars, adult beggars with fake handicaps, aggressive ticket touts and the more insidious unlicensed guides hovering at the entrances to the Medinas greeting prospective clients with a pleasant "good morning" or "bongjoor." All guides speak English with varying degrees of competence, many of the older ones were formally accredited licensed guides attached to the tourist offices, but dismissed for misconduct or criminal record, usually involving thieving.

    There are various techniques for deflecting these unwanted people, often just feigning deafness and ignoring them is sufficient, on other occasions the aggressive "in your face" touts may require some vocabulary, preferably in Arabic "sir falek!" ( shove off) most effectively delivered in a falsetto high-pitched scream, which will attract the attention of passers-by and confound the tout, encouraging him to nervously retreat back to his regular "bolt hole!"

    Another technique involves giving the tout a silent routine while producing a camera and setting it up to take his photograph , without exception they hate this and will quickly dive for cover.

    Occasionally, when confronted by a tout who is having a bad day because business is too slow, desperation can turn into frustration and the "race card" might be employed in an attempt to intimidate the traveller, the tout growling in menacing tones "you no like Morocco people?" The most effective response to this remark is to react with the disdain it deserves, briefly staring at the lowlife then abruptly walking away. Expect to hear further unsavoury mutterings following from a distance, which should also be ignored........

    In general, touts and street hustlers will always make the initial tentative or aggressive approach speaking English, another useful repellent tactic is once again to maintain the silent routine, accompanied by a nonplussed facial expression, the pest will usually revert to French, unsure of the "victim's" nationality and language skills, but by remaining absolutely silent and continuing to walk away the tout "brush off" can often be achieved. This particularly applies to "static" Medina touts, who specialise on guided tours in their own locality, this type of tout is rendered ineffectual by any perceived language difficulties, but if the victim makes the mistake of replying politely in English, it will be more difficult to shake him off, in which case revert to the other listed techniques.

    Not all suspicious characters lurking in the Medinas are touts, there is nowadays a covert police presence and differentiating between the two factions can be difficult for the inexperienced voyeur, an intensive ,unfaltering stare by "cop eyes" can give the essential clue, or maybe a slight bulge under the left jacket armpit ( or around the ankle, if a Miami Vice fan.)

    To avoid all this holiday stress it's advisable to book in advance the services of an official guide from the tourist office wearing a badge and at a pre-determined rate of commission.

    Reptilean ticket tout. Counting the haul......... Pesky Medina tout. Bus station touts. Man in the shadows, is he a cop?
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Bennytheball's Profile Photo

    Strangers on the tram.....

    by Bennytheball Written Jul 30, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Arriving at Casa Voyageurs station on a hot Saturday, I make my way to the tram carstop, buy my ticket and wait for the next city-bound tram. When it arrives I struggle in haste with my luggage on to the crowded leading carriage, hoping my regular unreserved hotel would not be "complet monsieur" on a busy weekend.

    It was standing room only, but a beautiful young girl dutifully vacated her seat in compliance with an advisory notice requesting old people (I qualify) to be given seating preference, initially I am confused by travel and heat exhaustion and imagine she has curious eyes for me, but this brief fantasy is quickly dispelled when I realise she has preferential eyes for her companion, a smug dude who notices with amusement her errant attention.

    Annoyingly, this mini-drama detracts from my primary objective of being in the leading carriage to film the hi-tech driver's cab with all its amazing live CCTV recording displayed on the dashboard surrounding the speedometer, but these congested distractions compel me to postpone my photo session until the following day, not wishing to appear ungrateful for the vacated seat by standing up and peering through the driver's partition.

    Alighting at the Central Market, I made my way to Hotel Mon Reve which fortunately was not "complet monsieur" and I succeeded in securing a top floor room with panoramic street view.

    Next day, on the tram journey to Ain Diab beach the tram was again crowded and I could only use the keyring camera of variable and hopeful picture quality to capture a couple of grainy images, with all the security cameras fitted in the coaches constantly on surveillance I deemed it too risky to produce my Fuji camera which often provokes an adverse reaction.

    Waiting for the tram......
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Photography
    • Trains

    Was this review helpful?

  • annalecce's Profile Photo

    A paradise of clear fresh water near Chefchaouen

    by annalecce Written Jun 15, 2014

    30 km from Chefchaouen, the fantastic blue town nestled in the North of Morocco in the Atlas mountains there are Ankchur falls. You must take a guide and wear trekking equipment because you have to walk on the rocks and the water. You begin the walk at the dam that creates a wonderful lake where boys like to dive and to swim, then you climb (not so hard) and you find on the way little pools where you can find refreshment. After 30 minutes about you arrive under a natural bridge that is called "The Eye of God". The water is fresh and very very clear, you can swim under lush greeneries. Several simple restaurants prepare tajine very very tasty with the local ingredients and herbs. Very recommended!

    the Eye of God cristal waters! green
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Struggle for Water

    by solopes Updated Jun 9, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Olive tree are generalized in Mediterranean area, and Morocco is no exception.

    Being a resistant tree, it needs not too much water to survive, but... it needs some. That's why we may see in Morocco the trees lined along trenches, trying to retain the few water from raining.

    Without the exuberance shown by the vineyards of Porto, they compose an interesting perspective of the fight against the advance of the desert.

    Morocco Morocco
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Desert

    Was this review helpful?

  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Asilah

    by solopes Updated Dec 16, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Close to Tangier this old city with a wide beach, keeps well visible the signs of Portuguese occupation. With its white houses, Asilah is a good stop.

    Asilah - Morocco
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Ksar es Sghir

    by solopes Updated Dec 16, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A small village, once occupied by the Portuguese, lost all its importance since then. At least that's what it seems, since for many years I couldn't find it in VT.

    Now it already is, but, as I saw it in my visit to Tangier, and have not much to say about the place, I will leave the tip in Tangier's page as originally.

    Ksar-es-Seghir
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Csar el Quibir

    by solopes Updated Dec 16, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Following the coast between Tanger and Rabat you will pass a town that, according to Portuguese will, would never exist - Alcacer Quibir. That was the place of our most shaming military defeat, with the king's death forcing the loss of independence to Spain for 80 years. Fortunately the event is only commemorated with a small and discreet monument.

    So, if you pass there, remember: you never read me, you know nothing, don't look, it's just a common place with a common old canon.

    Alcacer Quibir - Morocco
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Kenitra

    by solopes Updated Dec 16, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I only stopped in Kenitra to see the tropical garden.

    I don't know if this small city has any other interesting point but the garden is a refreshing brake in any trip.

    Kenitra - Morocco Kenitra - Morocco
    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

    Was this review helpful?

  • EviP's Profile Photo

    Aguelmane Sidi Al

    by EviP Written Aug 17, 2013

    On the road from Midelt, after the Oued Ziz Valley, about 52 before Azrou the scenery seems to be littered with dark pumice rock.

    A turnoff to the right directs toi , the largest of the region's many mountain lakes, which is pooled in extinct craters and it is said to have plenty of perch, pike and trout.

    Aguelmane Sidi Al, Morocco Aguelmane Sidi Al, Morocco Aguelmane Sidi Al, Morocco Aguelmane Sidi Al, Morocco Aguelmane Sidi Al, Morocco
    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • angiebabe's Profile Photo

    Take winter warmers for the kids when driving

    by angiebabe Updated May 8, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Each visit to Morocco Ive always taken things with me that I can give to the local families - especially the children - and especially when I was regularly visiting Telouet - many berber families are still living and working off the land and doing whatever they can do to earn enough to live on or working in labour jobs and earning only 40-60 dirham a day - miniscule to what Moroccans in the cities and town with big cars and big houses have.

    Living out in the remote areas usually means harsher living conditions - ie washing clothes by hand, minimal electrical appliances - so people are making do with less - even donkeys, mules and horse and cart still.

    People including teachers we have met or stayed with out in these areas still stay it can be a very good thing to take school stationery supplies, interesting childrens book and arts and crafts to generate interest in their education, rather than choosing to stay a shepherd like their parents to support their family, and take them to a country school to distribute to children - often though it is best to find a gite owner or someone in tune with whats happening in the locality and where to take things to as there is also the rort of taking items to schools and the teachers family and friends end up with it all...we found a good time to do it is in front of the children and other adults at the school.

    Also hygiene items that we regard as a necessity that often become only a luxury such as tooth brushes and toothpaste......sanitary towels and wash clothes....these can also be given to clinics that are in remote areas such as at Tabant in Ait Bougoumez or the Ameln valley near Tafraoute for example.

    I believe theres still that fine line between helping as in understanding lack and wanting to help make things better in any way and the notion that foreigners have everything and have it easy and give handouts - so put your hand out and you will get something ie tourists are easy to manipulate....

    An example of one of my trips was flying to Marrakech with the intention of driving to Agadir for some warm sunny days with friends there but knowing how cold it gets in Morocco and knowing I intended to drive the TiznTest road which has numerous country villages along the way including up in the snowy and very cold mountain areas nearing the pass.
    And because we have a very good '£' shop near us with sets of scarves, hats and gloves and sets of light raincoats and packs of socks I was able to get quite a few of these to have with me while I was out driving.

    And along the way when I did stop to take photos - especially of scenic villages in the scenic valleys - when you think noone is around out appear children to say hello! And there were my opportunities to give to these children who were in dirty clothes and looking very skinny - might not be a great deal of help but I think its something to at least give them these things to help them with the cold and wet.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Adventure Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • kitsou's Profile Photo

    highlights in Morocco

    by kitsou Written Feb 10, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    September is beautiful in Morocco. Only the interior stays warm longer. Essaouria is my favorite place in Morocco for it's layback atmosphere and beach. Rabat has a beautiful historic old city in shades of white and blue. Fes was a culture shock of winding, crowded narrow paths in the old medina. I didn`t like Marrakech where the locals can be very agressive towards tourists. Watch out for pickpockets in the main square.You should make a point of including the Roman ruins outside Meknes and the pinetree forests of the interior at Efrane. You`re in for a `treat` navigating the Atlas mountains on switchback roads from the coast to Ouarzazate. Include the valley near Tinehir, for amazing rock formations. What about getting into the Sahara at Merzouga.....

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • aussirose's Profile Photo

    Telouet Kasbah - Morocco

    by aussirose Updated Jan 15, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    After traversing the Atlas Mountains on the first day of our Desert trip from Marrakech, we were headed towards Ouarzazate. This was our first tourist stop along the way.

    Kasbah Telouet is somewhere between Marrakech and Ouarzazate. This Castle is going through the ravages of time and crumbling. In 2010 work started to restore the Castle to it's original splendour. I am glad because the inside attests to the amazing intricate Moroccan designs and brilliant tile work.

    The story behind Kasbah Telouet is entertaining in itself. I relate a little in my travelogue.s*

    Telouet Kasbah by aussirose Telouet Kasbah by aussirose - inside Telouet Kasbah by aussirose - dining room Telouet Kasbah by aussirose - view out window Telouet Kasbah by aussirose - ruins
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Desert
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

Morocco Hotels

See all 2502 Hotels in Morocco

Top Morocco Hotels

Marrakesh Hotels
2230 Reviews - 6154 Photos
Agadir Hotels
251 Reviews - 741 Photos
Casablanca Hotels
512 Reviews - 1387 Photos
Tangier Hotels
491 Reviews - 1204 Photos
Essaouira Hotels
510 Reviews - 1412 Photos
Asilah Hotels
105 Reviews - 324 Photos
Fes Hotels
450 Reviews - 1159 Photos
Tetouan Hotels
109 Reviews - 310 Photos
Rabat Hotels
499 Reviews - 1224 Photos
Chefchaouene Hotels
94 Reviews - 334 Photos
Meknes Hotels
102 Reviews - 256 Photos
Ouarzazate Hotels
145 Reviews - 457 Photos
Merzouga Hotels
153 Reviews - 698 Photos
Safi Hotels
19 Reviews - 67 Photos
El Jadida Hotels
25 Reviews - 127 Photos

Instant Answers: Morocco

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

51 travelers online now

Comments

Morocco Off The Beaten Path

Reviews and photos of Morocco off the beaten path posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Morocco sightseeing.
Map of Morocco