Telouet Things to Do

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    by angiebabe
  • Things to Do
    by angiebabe
  • Things to Do
    by angiebabe

Most Recent Things to Do in Telouet

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    Visit lovely Telouet!

    by angiebabe Updated Mar 15, 2014

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    take the road heading down from TizinTichka Pass
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    The Berber village of Telouet, once of the seat of the Glaoui rulers of this part of the Atlas and Southern Morocco - only 21 km off the main road from Marrakech to Ouarzazate just past the top of Tizin Tichka - sits pretty much in a valley behind Morocco's second highest mountain pass so its up pretty high in the mountains.
    It therefore is an excellent spot to escape the summer heat - usually several degrees cooler or more than the heat of Marrakech and Ouarzazate.

    It means though it can be very cold in winter - bitterly cold at night! Its up in the snowline but the snow fall is fairly unpredictable - sometimes early November, sometimes not til late December or even early January! so pretty much best not to assume that travelling during winter is a problem until you actually have snow fall and create a problem.....

    The main roads are usually cleared fairly quickly as its a major route for access to the centre of the country - at all times through the day and night you will see trucks travelling with their loads on the move.
    This is where the nearby town of Taddert near the top of TizinTichka is a 24 hour truck and transport stop providing an array of food and fluids and facilities. Taddert is also where the snow plough trucks to clear any snow on the roads are kept and also the road barriers are here and on the other side of the pass at Ighrem, if the road has been closed - not usually closed til after night fall if they decide to close it. Ive driven through the pass when there was heavy snow on the road, with bumper to bumper cars and trucks and made it okay.

    The road to Telouet used to stop for normal cars 12 kms past at Anmiter, becoming rough 4x4 road but in 2011 or 2012 it was bitumened all the way through to Tamdaght which is great as its a really scenic road - for many years the route of the caravans that carted salt down from the Glaoui salt mines at Telouet down to the sub sahara and beyond....so there are a number of ancient kasbahs and villages along the journey - including Glaoui kasbahs to monitor the old caravan route.

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    Beautiful palace in its beautiful setting

    by angiebabe Updated Mar 15, 2014

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    always loved this view over the neighbours!
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    Grande palace in its setting in the valley of Telouet behind Tizn Tichka - the old village is the original slave quarters while Telouet was the main base for the Glaoui rulers, allowed to rule because they were in league with the French colonialists.
    The people, particularly tribes with malcontent of the disunity of the country and lack of power and wellbeing to the ordinary citizen, rose up and caused so much chaos that the French lost their power and ousted out of the country.
    The Moroccan King was returned from exile and the Glaoui family lost power and were exiled

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    extravagant mix of stucco,zellig and stucco design

    by angiebabe Updated Mar 15, 2014

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    Here at Telouet is an excellent opportunity to see traditional Moroccan embellishment and adornment of the nobles desire for beauty.

    There are some great places around that are in this style - using the great designs of tiling, which is zellij and stucco, which is the beautifully carved plaster - along with sheets of embossed cedar or even metals such as silver or copper.

    Moroccan art has long been known for its beauty - and you can see this is what still remains at the Bahia palace in Marrakech, the Musee de Marrakech (once a Sultan's Vizier's home), a couple of rooms in TArourirt Kasbah at Ouarzazate still have some of the legacy, some in the Hassan II mosque, Casablanca, and around Andalucia in Spain - such as the Alhambra and Mezquita.

    Many large houses in the old medina of Fez are designed in this style - and the palaces of the King that are not open to the public will have some of this traditional design.

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    They've tarsealed the road to Ait Benhaddou!!

    by angiebabe Updated Nov 14, 2013

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    The area between Anmiter and Tamdaght or Ait Benhaddou is known as the Ounila valley - the Ounila river runs through it - though I have seen some guide books refer to it as Paradise valley - the locals dont seeml to call it this though.

    This road was originally the road that the Glaoui rulers kept rule over as it was part of the caravan routes down through South Morocco to Mali and Mauritania and other countries of the sub-Sahara and there are still several Glaoui kasbahs enroute.
    Until recently this road has remained in use with many villagers along the OUnila river as it makes it way down through almost Grand Canyon looking landscape and for all these years has been rough piste or dirt road - but as so stunning and picturesque a popular route for 4x4 excursions.

    I actually did this road in 2004 in a normal car which was amazingly beautiful but very rugged and the 55 kms from Anmiter to Ait Benhaddou took us 5 hours!! Just recently a new asphalt road has been made and we drove this road this February 2012 with many almond trees in blossom in the fertile areas that follow the river winding throuh the valley and again in June - stunning! a new top must do route for normal car drivers!!

    Theres a few places to stop for coffee along the way and I noticed a new hotel in addition to quite a number of signs advertising gites.
    Its still not signposted at the main turn off to Telouet that it is now a normal route through to Ait Benhaddou.

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    The oldest parts of the kasbah

    by angiebabe Updated Nov 18, 2008

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    Before the 'modern' palace was built in the 1900's where the Glaoui pashas lived there was an even older palace built in the late 1700's - remains of which are still on the grounds and make for an interesting roam around.

    Locals live, play and work right closeby - descendants of the slaves and workers that were bound up in the daily requirements of the palace Lords - which accounts for the number of very dark skinned peoples - brought up from the Sahara and Sub-sahara - who live in the Telouet area amongst the berber peoples. And of course more recent immigrants into the town and area.

    Through the years Ive lived in and visited Telouet Ive noticed with the number of tourists - which is really probably not many - that come through Telouet theyve either come whizzing in as part of a huge agency entourage of 4x4 vehicles - stopped for lunch at Telouet Auberge and then taken for a fast tour of the inside of the palace and then whizzed off again - the lucky ones get to see the carpet shop and be taken for a walk through the ruins and around
    the slave quarters on the way to the beautiful rooms that remain inside the 'modern' palace.

    The even luckier ones with inside knowledge - eg the ones who come via Jackies House or know locals - stay and appreciate the area!

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    snippets of the Grandeur and Opulence going

    by angiebabe Written Apr 23, 2008

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    As you wander about the ruins are the exciting little telltale signs of the beauty and grandeur that was here before us - going and gone - the huge cracks that seem to have appeared in the main entrance building of the remaining buildings that can still be entered of the newer palace bring home that 2 or 3 years ago my connections living in Telouet reckoned that only 4 years remained in which the public would be able to enter to see the last of the opulent rooms of the Glaoui - following the loss of the oldest palace which is in total ruins absorbing back into the earth that it was made from.

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    Walk around the original village/slave quarters

    by angiebabe Written Jan 28, 2008

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    soaking up the sun
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    The village off the main road that runs through Telouet is the original village of Telouet.

    Its a fascinating old village with narrow streets and pathways making their ways in and around the mudbrick houses often closely linked or built on top of one another - with interesting doors and doors and windows placed to maintain privacy in the lives of the families living so closely together here - with their animals as well.

    Being so close to the palace there are excellent views to the palace from all directions.

    Ive several times enjoyed so wandering around the streets and pathways to see and capture what beholds! Especially on a day with glorious day in spring!

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  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    Telouet Kasbah - View from the Central Hall

    by suvanki Updated Jan 7, 2008

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    Telouet from the central hall of the kasbah

    This is probably the most photographed view from the Kasbah! A shot of Telouet and its mosque framed by the ornate filigree metal window frame.

    Surrounding the alcove are more examples of typical tiles, but I'm afraid that my photo is too dark to show these clearly.

    The iron grille work is a common feature of the older palaces - from the days of the harem, when the women could look out, but not be seen by those (i.e men) looking from the outside.

    The area of ground outside was probably equivalent to the mechouar, or Judgement Hall, of the older Royal Palaces - where parades and Fantasias would have been held by the Glaoui brothers to impress their guests and visitors.
    Another purpose of the mechouar was for public executions - I would imagine that it was quite likely that these took place too.

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    Telouet Kasbah - Glass skylight

    by suvanki Updated Jan 7, 2008

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    Glass skylight Telouet Kasbah

    Moving further into the Kasbah, we passed under this glass skylight Again, You get an idea of the deterioration of the place in the destruction of the walls, and the missing glass panels.

    I quite liked the contrast of the blue sky and the teracotta mud walls

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    Archway in Telouet Kasbah

    by suvanki Updated Jan 7, 2008

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    Archway with green tiles, Telouet Kasbah

    From my picture You can see how the Kasbah is deteriorating, with some idea of how it might have looked.
    Above the arch are remnants of a green tiles, green being an important colour in Islam - Many of the important Mosques around the world have green tiles in their decoration.

    You can also see how this structure is made - mud bricks, covered with more mud. The red colouring comes from the iron rich earth of this area. This is a typical way that buildings are constructed in Southern Morocco. The mud bricks are sometimes strengthened with straw.

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    Telouet Kasbah 2

    by suvanki Updated Jan 7, 2008

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    Our group listening to the story of the Glaoui

    While we were waiting for the Guardian of the Kasbah, Mohammed our guide told us about the history of the Kasbah and its dark past. (I'm getting around to writing this on my Intro page)*

    To be continued....

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    Telouet Kasbah or Dar El Glaoui

    by suvanki Updated Nov 7, 2007

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    Telouet Kasbah or Dar El Glaoui
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    We visited this Kasbah after leaving Ait Benhaddou, on the way to our overnight destination of Tighza.

    To be honest I was getting a bit 'kasbah-ed out'!

    The previous night we'd stayed at Ait Benhaddou (although strictly speaking this is a ksar!), prior to this I'd visited a few kasbahs in the Valley of A Thousand Kasbahs, plus the Glaouis other well visited kasbah in Ouarzazate!

    So slightly less enthusiastically, I joined our group, who were following our leader towards the entrance. We waited while the guardian of the kasbah hurried to collect his huge keys to let us inside.

    From the outside the kasbah was quite ruined in parts, and I was very surprised to hear that this was quite a modern abode- The remaining part was built in the late 19th to mid 20th century- completed in 1945!

    Well - I really enjoyed visiting this Kasbah - it was quite stunning inside, and it was quite shocking to hear that this might not be here for much longer - follow my tips and You'll find out why!

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    Leaving Telouet for Tighza

    by suvanki Written Aug 20, 2007

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    Telouet to Tighza
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    Eventually the carpets had been chosen, haggled over and a price agreed. So we left the carpet shop (We'd return again the next day on our way back from Tighza for those who'd purchased carpets, to collect them).

    Setting off later than planned - we still had an hours walk to the Gite from the car park, and we had to load the mules with our overnight pacs, before it got too dark to see.

    The scenery was still stunning, especially in the late afternoon light. Shadows formed interesting patterns on the sides of the green coloured slopes.
    Apparently the red colouring of the mountains is due to the iron ore, the green colouring is from the copper deposits.

    To be continued..

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    Telouet

    by suvanki Written Aug 20, 2007

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    Auberge Telouet
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    I'm afraid that I didn't get much of a look around this town, apart from a couple of snatched views as our mini bus turned around. If I'd known how long we were going to be waiting for those in our party who wanted to buy carpets, I'd have wandered down for a look around

    I'm afraid that this is one of the bugbears of being on an organised tour - a few times I would have liked to have stopped off to look around a small town, or a busy market. I suppose that it would have been the same if I'd travelled by public transport though.

    Ah well I might get the chance again. Hopefully If I do return it will be on a Wednesday or Thursday to visit the weekly markets too.

    So from my seat on the bus I spotted some old metal washing powder signs - (a trip down memory lane!), a couple of mules waiting patiently - no doubt their straw panniers would soon be filled with provisions, and a few shops including an Artisan centre. I've just realised that on looking closer at my pics, I've taken a pic of the Auberge Telouet (Which I've read about a few times)

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    Telouet - Tomb of a saint

    by suvanki Written Aug 20, 2007

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    Opposite the Kasbah, I noticed this small building with a teracotta and green tiled roof, there didn't appear to be any windows. Our guide informed us that it was a tomb for a saint.
    Now that's as much as I know- he wasn't able to tell us who the saint was, and why they were buried there.

    Anyone else know?

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