Fes Local Customs

  • Local Customs
    by Robin020
  • Local Customs
    by Robin020
  • Local Customs
    by Robin020

Most Recent Local Customs in Fes

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    Bargaining

    by solopes Updated Dec 30, 2013

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    Fes - Morocco

    No, I don't like it, but "In Rome be a Roman"... so, I tried my best bargaining everywhere. I don't know (nor care) if I did good or bad deals! I just found amusing that, for them, it seems more important to discuss the articles than... selling them.

    That's why sometimes I gave up and left, and... bought cheaper at the shop doors.

    Remember: Bargaining is a cultural reference, and if you don't do it you will be spending your money and... chocking them.

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    Haggling down

    by Robin020 Written Mar 3, 2012
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    When you are not a locals means the price is double or triple for any thing you want to buy.
    so for example if the price of the teapot is 70 the guy may say 350 or more.
    I do remember I wanted to buy a wallet he said 150 I paid 30.
    the same with cloth etc.
    Morroco is a big tourist trap so do not trust locals easily.specially the young boys who have nothing else to do just to give tourist hard time by trying to sell you worthless informations guiding you to places that are one stone throw,products or any thing else maybe even trying to be a tour guide They offer any service you could imagine and do every thing for money.

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    tea

    by iaint Written Jan 2, 2010

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    biscuits were gone before I got the camera out
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    A key component of Moroccan life!

    This should be on all my Moroccan pages, but Fes will have to do because that's where the photos were taken.

    I arrived at my riad before my room was ready, so I was offered mint tea on the sunny roof terrace while I waited.

    Actually, I'd rather have dropped my bags and gone for lunch, but one of the things you have to learn about Morocco is to just give yourself up to doing things their way. If you do you'll have more fun and be the better for it. Trust me...

    You will also be offered mint tea in shops - all part of the trading process.

    You can ask for it without sugar if you prefer.

    You will also notice how many tea houses there are, and that they're always busy!

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    Tagines

    by keeweechic Written Mar 12, 2009
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    Tagines are a slow cooked stew type dishes which are made up of fish, chicken or meat as well as vegetables, sometimes even with fruit like pears, olives and apples. Wonderful spices like saffron, turmeric, cinnamon, paprika Ras el hanout are added. The very traditional way to cook this stew is over coals and they were used as portable ovens for the nomads. Of course today they can be cooked in the oven.

    A Tagine is also a very different type of ceramic clay dome shaped cooking dish which can be very plain and basic to highly decorative and almost too lovely to want to cook with.

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    Mint Tea

    by keeweechic Written Mar 11, 2009
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    Mint Tea in Morocco is quite a culture and it is served everywhere. The green tea which was introduced by the British in 1854, is very sweet and unfused with mint. The tea is poured from a great height from a teapot to try and induce a froth in the small decorative glasses. It can be served hot or cold. It is offered in hospitality and it is considered rude not to accept.

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    The Fez Hat

    by keeweechic Written Mar 7, 2009

    The Fez hat or otherwise known as the Tarboosh. A cone shaped hat, usually red with a black tassel, many believe it may be originally of Greek origin. The Ottoman Turks then adopted the wearing of the Fez. You can find many of them for sale in Marrakech.

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    The Jalaba

    by keeweechic Written Mar 7, 2009
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    The Jalaba or Jellabas is a traditional dress of Morocco. It is more like an robe or overcoat with a hood. Both men and women wear the Jalaba but can be different colours and materials. The Jabador is a two piece outfit.

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    Zelij Tiles

    by keeweechic Written Mar 7, 2009

    Zeilij is a type of Moroccan tile mosaic and there is a beautiful fountain framed by a sandstone horseshoe arch on either side of the lower level of the Mausoleum. Zelij is a traditional art of Fez and the name given to a certain design handmade tiles chiseled into exact geometric shapes. It is commonly used for a number of things such as the tops of tables, floors and walls and of course beautiful fountains.

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    Guides

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated Feb 11, 2008

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    I was not approached by many "false" guides (who in most cases a) do not really know the city or b) try to overcharge you, or c) try to take you to their brother`s/father`s/uncle`s shop or d) all in one), but to use an official guide for an introduction to Fes-El-Bali is highly recommended. They might even tell you the one or other odd information which you do not find in the guide books, and are pretty cheap (100 Dirhams per hour). They are also useful for navigating the city for the first time - as you will soon find out, orientation is mainly learning by doing here. A city map is only of limited use here.

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    Donkeys have right of way

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated Feb 7, 2008

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    Many passages in the Medina are so narrow that the only means of transport is either human labour or a donkey. It is incredibile what these sorry animals have to shoulder here - don`t be surprised when you see one with several TV-sets or refrigerators on its back. When you hear the sound "barak, barak", best get out of the way quick, a donkey is coming and you don`t want to get run over. The donkey has always right of way.

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    Fassis: Better than you

    by JamalMorelli Updated Feb 9, 2007

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    giant wedding chair, lil guy - photo Jamal Morelli
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    Though the title catches the spirit, ask around. What do Moroccans outside Fes think of Fassis?
    As an adopted Fassi, I'll say that the attitude isn't just that your city is measurable less souflful, that your food (and yo' mama's food) is not as tasty, your clothes don't have that combo of ancient elegance and still sexy look, that your particular culture hasn't had the 1300 year headstart that Fes has -

    I'll say it again and again - any place that has had as long as old Fes has had to come up with an idea of itself is going to feel, or at least appear to feel, superior. (and therefore, possibly make you feel out-classed, a cultural 'wuss')

    WARNING: uh-oh, You feel small.
    Well, if you feel put upon by so much seemingly innate native cultural magnificence and grandness, try this: Hot Summer Best Selling Books are a bit of weak point with them. So point out (to a Fassi poet, Sufi philosopher, medina boho, Quran reciter for one example) that while the Fez-educated authors may be of some of most profound in the world, they don't really understand 'where it is at' when it comes to Jackie Collins! Yeah! Fes has never created anything like "The Stud," "The B*tch" or anything in the Hollywood Series.

    Bayti: Care for the Street Kids of Morocco
    Morocco
    Learn Arabic
    Bargaining pt 1

    Photos by Jamal Morelli, uploaded at Studio Shamharush

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    Shoemakers crammed into Tiny Spaces

    by JamalMorelli Written Dec 30, 2006

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    Even though it is a hotter topic to talk about women, poor men's lives (to me) look ten times worse. You will see it during your wandering in the medina. The chinese have started competing heavy in the Fes shoe market, so, if you want to help the local economy - buy Fassi shoes (even if they have Italian designer label on them)

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    Eyes to the medina's cave walls: Love Graffitti

    by JamalMorelli Written Dec 29, 2006

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    Love bomb shrapnel - photo Jamal Morelli

    (There are more photo examples and a bit more verbiage on the Moroccan page...)

    Something to make your heart small while lost in the medina is a preponderance of hearts and the word 'love' scratched into the walls...

    Keep your eyes and heart open...

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    Headscarves

    by JamalMorelli Updated Dec 29, 2006

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    Headscarves2 - courtesy of Studio Shamharush
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    I go into it more on my Moroccan page - this is a good town to wear a headscarf if you have ever considered it. It is not mandatory by a long shot, just quite common to see on the women on Fes.

    Bayti: Care for the Street Kids of Morocco
    Morocco
    Learn Arabic
    Bargaining pt 1

    Photos uploaded at Studio Shamharush

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    • Women's Travel

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    Clapping Games

    by JamalMorelli Written Dec 28, 2006

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    Follow this rhythm, baby - photo Jamal Morelli

    The tiny alleys and cave like nature of the medina make great acoustic for the wild polyrhythmic clapping games of Morocco. Keep your ears open...try and follow the pattern and you will belong to Fes in your self-hypnotized state...

    Back to the Moroccan Main Page

    Bayti: Care for the Street Kids of Morocco
    Morocco
    Learn Arabic
    Bargaining pt 1

    Photos by Jamal Morelli, uploaded at Studio Shamharush

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Music

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Fes Local Customs

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