Fes Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by fachd
  • Things to Do
    by fachd
  • shut for 10 years of renovation - a long wait!
    shut for 10 years of renovation - a long...
    by angiebabe

Most Recent Things to Do in Fes

  • fachd's Profile Photo

    The Medina (the old city)

    by fachd Updated Dec 29, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    The Medina (the old city) is definitely a must visit in Fes. When you visit the medina, no kidding it’s like you are stuck on a time warp. The Medina of Fes is the biggest and the oldest in Africa. The old city is surrounded by tall ancient wall.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • fachd's Profile Photo

    Fez Souk - haggle away

    by fachd Updated Dec 29, 2010

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    Inside the Fez Souk you’ll see mule loaded with goods in the busy narrow streets (I felt sorry for the mule, it look sad and overworked), the mule have the right way. The smell of different spices will overwhelm your senses, merchants selling carpets, some selling dates, sweets, breads. In the hustle and bustle of the market stand many stalls offering you to buy leather goods, ceramics, pottery, copper pots and pan, shirts, kaftans and stalls selling old guns. The streets are also workshops, cafes and restaurants. Amongst the stalls in the busy narrow streets you’ll find an Islamic and Jewish school. Medina is complex you can easily get lost in the labyrinth; if you don’t speak Arabic it’s better to get a professional guide, we had guide from Trafalgar tourist. If you want to explore alone get a map from the tourist office, but apparently you can also followed a tourist circuits. While you are visiting the old city be alert for pickpockets.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • fachd's Profile Photo

    Royal Palace

    by fachd Updated Dec 29, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    We visited the Royal Palace in Fes. It was built in the 17th century. You can’t go in into the palace but the outside is interesting for the tourist. The king of Morocco stays at the palace when he visited Fes. The palace is one of the major attractions and is of great historical value. When tourists visit the palace they can take photos with the royal guard, we did.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Music
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • stewarth99's Profile Photo

    Visit a borj (nothing to do with star trek)

    by stewarth99 Updated Aug 13, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Borj Nord from just outside the walls of Fes
    4 more images

    Borj Nord is one of those attractions that you can see from anywhere in the town but nobody seems to visit! Borj's North and South were built, not to protect the town from invaders, but to control the unruly inhabitants of Fes. To extract taxes and duties form the free spirited Fassi.
    Borj Nord houses a museum of arms and militaria. Fascinating and deadly. The grounds are beautifully kept with many large and small cannon in the grounds.
    Borj Nord is sadly missed off the usual Tourist trail. The last time I went there I had the whole museum to myself. Trip Advisor doesn't list it.
    The grounds are extensively used by the locals - I suspect it is a local trysting place. A place for people of opposite sexes to see one another and to be seen.
    Walk along the road from the main entrance in the afternoon and you will find the local men playing cards. Not gambling I think but playing whist/bridge, and boy, do they get excited about their games.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Archeology
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • JessieLang's Profile Photo

    The Mellah

    by JessieLang Updated Jan 22, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Mellah
    2 more images

    The Mellah was the Jewish Quarter. The well-to-do Jews (craftsmen, etc.) lived just outside the palace walls in nice apartments with cedar balconies. Some of them even had a view of the palace gardens. The families lived upstairs and had workshops on the ground level. When the Jews were forced out of Spain in the 14th Century, they were welcomed in Morocco. Many were employed at the palace. Centuries later, their descendants moved to Israel, but they kept the apartments which are now very valuable.

    (The poor Jews lived in a section of the Medina that wasn’t beautiful then or now.)

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • JessieLang's Profile Photo

    View from North Borj

    by JessieLang Written Jan 22, 2010

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Medina from North Borj
    2 more images

    Go up a winding road to the North Borj (16th Century fort) for a great view of the Medina. From the hilltop we could look down on the sprawling old city with its surrounding walls and pick out some of the landmarks.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • JessieLang's Profile Photo

    The Tannery

    by JessieLang Written Jan 22, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tannery vats
    3 more images

    The oldest tannery in Fes has been at that same location, using the same all-natural processes, since the 14th Century. Pigeon droppings (acid) are combined with pomegranate rinds for the tanning process. They don’t use any chemical dyes—poppies provide red color; saffron is yellow; indigo is blue.

    To see the tannery operation, visitors go up on the roof and look down at the courtyard. As you go up, you are handed some mint leaves to hold under your nose! I dealt with the smell, but my eyes were watering by the time we came back down the stairs. The men who wade around in those vats all day have one of the worst jobs ever.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • iaint's Profile Photo

    tanneries

    by iaint Updated Jan 13, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    seen from the shop
    1 more image

    Worth seeing - it is like a scene out of the Bible.

    Guess they don't have a health & safety culture, yet.

    Useful information -
    - they change the colour of the dyes they use every few days (today red, next time yellow)
    - the dyes are all natural (allegedly)
    - this means they don't harm the workers
    - the workers cover themselves with olive oil before starting, and this helps stop their skin changing colour
    - they only work 4-5 hours per day in the dying process
    - the smell is quite something

    Of course your visit is all about getting the opportunity to be sold some leather goods...

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • iaint's Profile Photo

    Kairaouine mosque & university

    by iaint Written Jan 1, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    best photo I could get...

    This dates back to the 800s! It was built by a refugee from Tunisia for fellow refugees. For centuries it has been highly regarded as a centre for Islamic studies.

    Again, not open to non-Muslims, but you can see in the gate!

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • iaint's Profile Photo

    Zawiyya Moulay Idriss II

    by iaint Written Jan 1, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    the tomb

    This is the mausoleum of Moulay Idriss II - the son of the founder of the country's first dynasty - and a highly significant place for all Moroccans.

    Although it may have been his father, he is often credited with founding the city.

    Non-Muslims are not allowed to enter, but you can (as I did) take a picture from the entrance.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • iaint's Profile Photo

    Medersa Bouanania

    by iaint Written Dec 31, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    one side of the courtyard
    2 more images

    A medersa is just a school - let's not forget that!

    This one is beautiful, between the mosaic tiles and the intricately carved cedar.

    Currently being restored (with UNESCO help, if I remember well).

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • iaint's Profile Photo

    Medina

    by iaint Updated Dec 31, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Medersa Bouanania
    3 more images

    As I had left myself a bit short of time to "do my own thing" in exploring the medina, my riad manager helped me to organise a 3 hour guided tour - my own guide for 250 mad.

    In almost all respects it was a smart move. I learned a lot and saw a lot, plus no time was wasted getting lost!

    I saw the tanneries, the Medersa Bouanania, the Zawiyya Moulay Idriss II, the Kairaouine mosque, a couple of souks, as well as being subjected to the hard sell in carpet, leather, metalwork & antique places.

    The latter were the downsides. I don't like paying a guide to take me to his favourite haunts so he can pick up commissions.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • iaint's Profile Photo

    Dar Batha Museum

    by iaint Updated Dec 31, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    entrance courtyard
    4 more images

    Also known as the Museum of Moroccan Art, and the Museé du Batha.

    It was originally built as a Hispano-Moorish palace over 100 years ago. The building and garden are worth seeing in themselves. You come out of the bustle of medina into this oasis of calm.

    Cost 10 Mad for entry – it won’t take you long to get round.

    Exhibits include carpets, pottery, jewellery etc.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Mausoleum of Zaouia Moulay Idriss II

    by keeweechic Written Mar 12, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    Moulay Idriss II was the founder of Fez and the mausoleum where he is buried is in the centre of Fez. He died in 791. The Mausoleum which was built in the 18th century and restored during the 19th century, it is the most venerated in Morocco. Non-Muslims cannot enter unfortunately.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Jewish Sector (Mellah)

    by keeweechic Written Mar 12, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    The Mellah is the old Jewish quarter of Fes and it was in this city that the first official mellah was established in 1438. It is set within walls near the Royal Palace for protection from the Muslim population.

    The Jewish population in the Mellah came close to annihilation in 1465 when the Merinid Dynasty was overthrown. Prior to this time the Jewish population had been protected within the Mellah. The name Mellah comes from the word salt. Today the old quarter is mainly inhabited by Muslims.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Fes

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

82 travelers online now

Comments

Fes Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Fes things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Fes sightseeing.

View all Fes hotels