Medina, Tangier

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  • MEDINA
    MEDINA
    by draguza
  • Grand Mosque (Medina, Tangier, Morocco)
    Grand Mosque (Medina, Tangier, Morocco)
    by Redang
  • Medina (Tangier, Morocco)
    Medina (Tangier, Morocco)
    by Redang
  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    The Medina

    by keeweechic Written Mar 29, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tangiers medina is quite small in comparison with other Moroccan cities. The walled city runs up the side of the hill to the kasbah. You can enter the medina from the Grand Socco through the gate and into Rue as-Siaghin. This used to be the old Jewish quarter where a gold market used to operate.

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  • traveloturc's Profile Photo

    The Medina of Tangier

    by traveloturc Written Jul 6, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tangier Medina
    1 more image

    The ancient quarter of many cities in northern Africa are called Medina. Medina of Tangier is an old quarter with more than one entries with the colorful life of northern Africa.A part of the polulation still live in this area and they have also some commercial areas in the region.
    Souk means "open air bazaar/ market"And this area has the small and the big souk which is called Le Grand Socco and le petit Socco.Tourists like very much the narrow streets of the area and they dont realize that this narrow streets helps to make shadow in order to preserve from the heat of the sun and it also helps to control the way going to the top where the governor is situated.

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  • Carmela71's Profile Photo

    Old Medina

    by Carmela71 Updated Aug 26, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Get lost!

    Once you enter in the old medina, all the hassle finish, even the shop attendants are not so ... enthusiastic!

    You will definitely get lost there, but that will give you the option to find places you will may have not seen in other way.

    Let yourself enjoy it and forget the rest!

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  • grets's Profile Photo

    Medina

    by grets Written May 8, 2005

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The day we were in Tangier, was market day, and women come from the vilages around Tangier with their wares in basket, setting up makeshift stalls on the pavement to sell their goods. Many of them will wear traditional outfits.

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  • freya_heaven's Profile Photo

    Medina Market

    by freya_heaven Updated Jan 13, 2005

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Medina Market Stall

    The Market stalls in the Medina could actually be the Indoor market at Plymouth (from looking at the photo). It has a very familiar feel to it. You seem to be able to but most things from here.

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  • Frisbeeace's Profile Photo

    Medina - Big and Petit Zocco

    by Frisbeeace Written Jul 11, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Medina - Gate to old city

    The Medina is the old Arab town which includes a two markets : the Grand Socco and the Petit Socco.

    The Grand Socco is a huge and permanent market at the entrance of the old medina but also a meeting place and a transportation hub. Here is where the modern city meets the narrow streets of the old city.

    The Petit Socco is basically a small square, at the southern entrance of the old city, with some bad reputation.

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  • dlytle's Profile Photo

    The Old Medina of Tangier

    by dlytle Written Nov 2, 2003

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Suqs show off their wares in Tangier's Medina

    The medina of Tangier is a real one: It houses two old marketplaces (the Grand Socco and the Petit Socco) in Tangier. Streets are narrow, houses come in many different styles, and surprisingly, most of this medina is in good condition. That is a proof that even people with some money both live and work here.

    The medina is quite big, and there are many commercial areas. Most of these serve the tourist traffic, and it is more difficult to find any areas where real handicraft is performed.

    Other areas are solely devoted to living, and there are plenty of nice houses, painted doors, decorated gates and rosebushes all around.

    As you walk through the Medina Gate off the Grand Socco, take a deep breath and then start tackling the maze of narrow, twisting streets. You will find aromas drifting from the spice stalls and shopkeepers trying to entice you into their shops to haggle good naturedly, though sometimes too persistently, over their wares.

    The suqs, in all their teeming energy, are the places to buy your goods and souvenirs, from embroidered shirts to djellabas (the long, flowing robes with full sleeves and a hood that you may notice some locals wearing), to leather goods and hammered and enameled brass. Always bargain, and if you can, learn a little basic French to help you do it. It's expected, and the shop owners will respect you for it. (You may still walk away with no bargain, but they'll respect you for it!)

    Some shops, especially in the nicer buildings, have a system of fixed prices, and you will only be able to haggle it down a little bit. But that is not the biggest problem: they sell things here at 2-5 times normal tourist price. And they are the very same products other shops have without any better quality!

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  • dlytle's Profile Photo

    The Medina Gate at the Grand Socco in Tangier

    by dlytle Written Nov 2, 2003

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Arched gate to the Medina in the Grand Socco

    You can enter the Medina from the Grand Socco through an arch at one corner. Once you do you'll find yourself on the Rue d'Italie, which becomes the Rue de la Kasbah leading to the old quarter.

    Lots of interesting people pass through these gates and if you are given a moment or two, just do some people watching.

    On the right side of this arched gate you will find a map of the streets of the medina which will show you just how many little streets there are and how they wander all over the place. Look for it as your adventure into the old shopping district of the Medina begins.

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Medina (old City)

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Dec 20, 2008

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Medina

    The old City is a great place to wander through winding streets and imagine you step back in time 200 years ago.

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  • Redang's Profile Photo

    The Medina: General View

    by Redang Updated Apr 9, 2008

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    Medina (Tangier, Morocco)
    4 more images

    This is the old part of Tangier, and the most important of typical or esaiest gate to enter it, is from the Grand Socco.

    For more pics, visit the travelogue.

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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    The Medina

    by mvtouring Written Aug 3, 2004

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Walking around Tangier's medina (old town), I got to Kasbah - old arab castle or rather its remainings. The only people walking there were a few tourists busy taking pictures.

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  • mbixler's Profile Photo

    Gates to the Medina

    by mbixler Written Apr 5, 2004
    Medina gate

    I love the Arabic architecture! There are several entrances or "gates" into the medina - or old city.

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  • annebeth's Profile Photo

    The Medina Market

    by annebeth Written Mar 23, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is the market outside the Kasbar. They sold just about anything you can imagine. This is a shop that sells many varietys of olives!

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