Fun things to do in Casablanca

  • Watch out for the tram!
    Watch out for the tram!
    by Bennytheball
  • Casablanca's  beach.
    Casablanca's beach.
    by Bennytheball
  • The Marabout...
    The Marabout...
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Casablanca

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    Syndicate du Tourism

    by Doctor38 Updated Jan 16, 2008

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    If you want to save time than visit this place and ask for a tour guide who will show you around Casablanca. The tour will cost you 450 DH for 3 people and it will last for 4 hrs. It includes transportation for 3 people plus the guide. The guide will take to Mosque Hassan II, the Old Medina, Alhoboos area and show around the old Royal office.

    This office is located on Mohamed V Avenue. The road is easily located in down town Casablanca. At the office you can arrange to meet with one of the official guide. To be honest I have not used this service but I looked into the matter and since J had enough time I thought that I can do it myself. It might be a good idea for someone who is staying for a very short time in Casablanca

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    Mahakma Pasha

    by call_me_rhia Written Jan 12, 2008

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    Place Mohammed V is the center of town, and the site of most of the government functions - among the fine French colonial buildings that adorn this new town square, you have the Mahakma Pasha - which is built more in Moorish style than in French style.

    This building is all made of marble, stone and wood - and it's very large... it was built in 1948 and has about 60 rooms: originally it was meant to serve as the Muslim city tribunal and the Casablanca Pasha audience hall. Today the building is still used as a courthouse

    Mahakma Pasha

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    Parc de la ligue arabe

    by call_me_rhia Updated Jan 12, 2008

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    The Parc de la ligue arabe (Arab League park) is a wonderful park with plenty of different pal trees, as well as paths, green fields, and benches. It's also and especially full of people; singles jogging, couples walking hand in hand, families taking their children for a stroll, and old men playing playing bowl.

    This park is very alive and kicking, and one could really spend hours, people watching and relaxing. It is also flanled by cafes and small restaurants - so it's also a nice address to stop for tea, just like locals do. Inside the park there are also a couple of nice pavillions/small buildings... which I never found out what they are.

    Parc de la ligue arabe Parc de la ligue arabe

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    Ancienne Medina

    by Sambawalk Updated Aug 5, 2006

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    Even though the ancienne Medina is the oldest part of the city, the medina looks much newer than it is and feels more like a European town than a medieval medina in other cities in Morocco. There are a fairly short strip of the shopping area and there should have no problem for you to lose your bearing in this medina.

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    Watch the Atlantic breakers

    by uglyscot Written Dec 4, 2005

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    As an exile from home, I love to be beside the sea. So the chance to watch the breakers rolling in and crashing on the shore is something that I enjoy doing.The Atlantic is not like the Mediterranean with its gentle tidal movement, but offers the full power of the ocean with crested waves moving one after the other shorewards.

    Atlantic breakers looking to lighthouse
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    • Road Trip
    • Beaches

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    The centre of town

    by uglyscot Updated Dec 3, 2005

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    In the centre of town there are many tourist shops selling souvenirs, cafes and large buildings, presumably official buildings. There was a tower and alongside it a construction like an open work ball, but all rather shabby.
    Because of the heavy rain, the gutters were torrents of water.

    central Casablanca the tower
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  • venteeocho's Profile Photo

    The old city

    by venteeocho Written Jun 6, 2005

    The old city of Casablanca is conveniently located — just off the main town square from where all avenues radiate, and near the sea. But as you enter, you will see that it is not all that old after all, that the houses here often have a form and size which would have made them natural elements in the "new" parts of many other Moroccan cities.
    But still, it is very nice, even if it is surprisingly small. The best parts of the old city is made up of shopping areas, where all types of products are sold, and you should not either miss out on the less visited quarters — the areas where people live — where colours and shapes and curves brings you far away from elegance of downtown Casablanca.

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    The wide boulevards

    by venteeocho Written Jun 6, 2005

    Among the most visible aspects of Casablanca are the wide boulevards flanked by white, tall buildings. The streets run out as the leaves of a fan from the Place de Nations Unies. This place is the focal point of downtown Casablanca, and also the point where the modern town meets the medina.

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    Colonial Architecture

    by jantichm Written Apr 14, 2005

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    Casablanca is a treasure trove of a distinct brand of French colonial architecture. In the 1920's and 30's, the French extended the city well beyond the original town (or "medina" in Arabic). The architectural style in vogue at that time, art deco, was combined with what the French believed to be "moorish" elements.

    The hybrid style, known as "neo-mauresque", can be seen all through the Ville Nouvelle that the French built. The prime example of neo-mauresque architecture is the Habous area, also known as the Nouvelle Medina. It's a rendition of a "typical Moroccan village" that Walt Disney could have designed. The area is famous for its bookstores and a very friendly place to stroll around.

    neomoorish art
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  • Laerke's Profile Photo

    Souk

    by Laerke Written Aug 3, 2004

    At first this souk market seemed to be just like the Dubai ones, loaded with cheap copy and other bad quality stuff....

    Then I came across this one place selling Morrocan clay tagines and plates where, I think, I made a good deal bargaining the price down to almost half price. Somehow I still felt ripped off....?
    I did appriciate the invitation for a Morrocan tea though - apparently a common custom when the shop owner think theyve made a good deal?!

    Asking around for couscous, a local happily showed me and my colleagues around....we ended up having tea together after buying some freshly made breads to eat with it (crepe and one partly made of fine couscous - yum!).
    Along with the bread and the plates I came home having bought Morrocan tea and couscous....
    Worth it having met the locals....

    Morrocan bread

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    Hassan II Mosque

    by amsterdam_vallon Written Aug 3, 2003

    This mosque is the second largest to the Mecque. It can received 25000 peoples for their prayers. The minaret who is 200 m high is one of the greatest i've seen. At night, two laser are pointing at the Mecque and can be seen from 30 km.

    A must even if is full of tourist...

    - Women beware, no short allowed inside.
    - Put some sox too... no shoes allowed!!!
    - entry fee 100dh

    Mosque
    Related to:
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  • Get inside the City Hall....

    by maxovna Updated Sep 12, 2002

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    Get inside the City Hall. There you'll see a sample of Islam and Moresque architecture - the walls are decorated in this style.
    Very vividly I remember the inner court of the City Hall. You can see there four flowerbeds and one fountains, what is quite symbolic. Flowerbeds symbolize women, wives; the fountain - a Man, a Husband. It means that a Moslem can have four wives.

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  • Not far from the entrance to ...

    by maxovna Updated Sep 12, 2002

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    Not far from the entrance to New Medina there is City Hall, the seat of the government. Earlier it used to be the seat of the court.
    An interesting building from the point of view of architecture.

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  • Tired? Sit on a bench in the...

    by maxovna Updated Sep 12, 2002

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    Tired? Sit on a bench in the central square of Casablanca - the Square of Mohammed V. Under the reign of Mohammed V Morocco got independence, so the square is named in his honour.
    The square is a tourist attraction - that's why (specially for tourists) you can see there strange men wearing strange costumes of water-carriers who used to carry water in towns and villages many years (or centuries) ago. If you want to take a photo with such a man, you should tip him.

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    Marrakesh Express

    by CliffClaven Written Aug 24, 2002

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    When old Cliffie tired of sitting on his penthouse terrace listening to Pink Floyd and Crosby, Stills and Nash, he used to jump into his little red car for the easy morning's drive across the scrubby Moroccan desert to Marrakesh. He recalls lunching at the Iceberg restaurant in a temperature of 38 degrees, watching the water-sellers, dancers, snake-charmers and acrobats on the Djemaa el Fna square, wandering through the souks, eating spicy merguez sausages on a bitterly cold night, drinking in a dark, backstreet bar while a one-eyed ex-legionnaire casually picked his teeth with a stiletto.

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