Djamaa El Fna - Square, Marrakesh

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  • Djemaa el Fna, Marrakech
    Djemaa el Fna, Marrakech
    by antistar
  • Djemaa el Fna, Marrakech
    Djemaa el Fna, Marrakech
    by antistar
  • Jemaa El Fna
    Jemaa El Fna
    by CDM7
  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    All paths lead to ...

    by toonsarah Written Nov 20, 2009

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    Huge expanse of the Djamaa el Fna
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    Sooner or later it seems, all paths in Marrakesh lead to the Djamaa el Fna. The name (sometimes spelled “Djemaa el Fna” or “Jamaa el Fna”) means “Assembly of the Dead” in Arabic but a visit here suggests life in all its vibrancy. To call this the city’s main square doesn’t begin to do justice to it. This is a meeting place, a shopping centre, a performance space, a happening. It is surrounded by restaurants and cafés, each with a roof terrace to offer a ringside seat from where to observe all the action, but better by far to get immersed in it all yourself.

    Here is a snake charmer with a sleepy cobra waiting for tourists’ dirhams before luring him into action. Here is a man with a monkey wanting payment to pose with him perched on your shoulder. And over there a colourfully dressed water-seller is making more money from posing for photos than he ever will from selling water.

    Rows of stalls sell dried fruits; others freshly squeezed orange juice. Women offer to decorate your hand with henna, and men to shine your shoes – even if you are wearing trainers. You can buy a leather handbag or a packet of tissues, a lantern or a cigarette lighter. Mopeds weave past pedestrians, men push carts and donkeys pull them, horses trot past with tourist passengers perched in the caleche behind.

    Over it all towers the minaret of the Katoubia Mosque, the tallest building in the city, and at regular intervals the call to prayer rings out above the hubbub. But that one spiritual note barely seems to make an impression on all the secular activity at its foot, although the faithful no doubt pause briefly in their actions before returning to earthly matters of commerce and enterprise.

    Come here with an open mind, and with your wits about you. If you are unused to travelling “out of your comfort zone” you may find it unnerving at first, but take your time, watch from the sidelines for a while, and you will soon get a sense of how best to experience this place. You will probably be hassled for money, and almost certainly to buy (juice, water, henna decoration …) but say no firmly and if necessary move away – there are many other tourists and the would-be seller will soon pass on to the next one. Of course you must watch your possessions, but that is true in any crowded city square, anywhere in the world. And remember that a small sum to you can mean much more here, so if you really want that photo of a snake charmer or water-seller by all means pay a fair fee – it will bring back great memories long after your visit so will be worth the outlay.

    At night the square is even more vibrant – but that is a subject for another, Nightlife, tip …

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  • sunlovey's Profile Photo

    Indulge in coconut cookies galore!

    by sunlovey Written May 16, 2006

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    Coconut cookies for sale!

    You'll see a gazillion women walking around with trays containing rows of circular cookies... BUY SOME! They are deliciously soft and chock full of coconut. They taste wonderful and they'll cost you next to nothing, a girl staying at our riad bought tray after tray to pack and take home to France for her mom, dad, grandmother, sister, etc. They make a nice little dessert after dinner at one of the food stalls.

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  • SWFC_Fan's Profile Photo

    Djemaa El Fna square

    by SWFC_Fan Updated Mar 18, 2007

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    Djemaa El Fna square, Marrakech
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    The world famous Djemaa El Fna square is undoubtedly Marrakech's main tourist attraction.

    This bustling square is listed by UNESCO as a "Masterpiece of World Heritage" and fully deserves this title.

    It's hard to know where to start describing Djemaa El Fna, so the structure of this tip will reflect that of the square - a little bit disorganised and chaotic!

    The square is a hive of activity by day and by night. During the day, the square is dominated by carts selling freshly squeezed orange juice, dried fruits, spices and nuts.

    Crowds gather around snake charmers, acrobats, dancers, musicians and storytellers. Old ladies sit beneath umbrellas with syringes full of black henna, ready to tattoo any flesh in sight! Next to them, an elderly gentleman will offer to shine your shoes for just a few Dirhams, or tell your fortune if you prefer.

    You steady yourself to take a photo, but just as you get your shot in focus, a young child somersaults in front of your camera and asks for "just one Dirham please mister", while somebody is tugging on your sleeve in an attempt to sell you a wooden toy snake.

    Watch where you're pointing that camera! If the snake charmer (or the man with a monkey chained to his shoulder) thinks you're trying to photograph them, a demand for money will promptly follow. Men in traditional, colourful Moroccan dress will actively try to invade your photographs!

    As you step to one side to avoid a man selling leather belts, a moped dashes past, narrowly avoiding a collision with the oncoming donkey that is pulling a cartload of tourists through the square.

    By night, the aroma of grilled meats and spices fills the air. Crowds flock to the hundreds of food stalls for kebabs, seafood, snails or maybe a sheep's head. Beating drums and singing provide the background noise, while the smoke pluming from the food carts provides the atmosphere.

    Stop by one of the carts selling hot ginseng and cinnamon tea, stand shoulder to shoulder with the locals watching the activity unfold around you!

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  • angiebabe's Profile Photo

    Sunset from a roof top cafe

    by angiebabe Updated Aug 14, 2011

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    Sunset views from Cafe Argana
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    All the touristy books and guide books will tell you to do this - Ive done this a number of times and include it as a thing to do when taking or sending friends to Marrakech - a roof top cafe such as Cafe France, Cafe Glacier, Cafe-Restaurant Argana - where you can enjoy coffee or mint tea as the unfolding spectacle of the busy Djmaa elFna unfolds below you and the beautiful Marrakechi sun sets.

    UNFORTUNATELY CAFE ARGANA WAS DESTROYED EARLIER THIS YEAR 2011 BY A BOMB THAT EXPLODED UP ON THIS FLOOR IN MY PHOTO KILLING A NUMBER OF TOURISTS FROM VARIOUS COUNTRIES AND MOROCCANS - THE POLICE ARE STILL ACTIVELY ON THE HUNT FOR THOSE THEY HAVE BELIEVE ARE INVOLVED AS THIS IS A TREMENDOUS CONCERN TO THE GOVERNMENT TO MAINTAIN BOTH PEACE AND STABILITY AND CONTINUE WITH THEIR PUSH FOR INCREASED TOURISM

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  • Donna_in_India's Profile Photo

    Too Touristy But You Gotta Go!

    by Donna_in_India Updated Jul 15, 2009

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    As the sun sets, JEF fills with food stalls
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    I wasn't sure whether to put this under things to do or tourist traps! Obviously if you go to Marrakech you have to go to Jemaa el Fna. The Jemaa el Fna is the geographical, social and cultural center of the Medina full of the odd and unusual – but seemingly all geared to the tourist.

    There are musicians, snake charmers, monkey handlers, etc. all trying to persuade you to give them money for taking a picture. Most of the activity is at night when food stalls set up and open, but there are still plenty of people around in the day and the souks are open during the day as well.

    We walked through the square and before we knew it, a man approached Sandy, wrapped a couple of snakes around his neck, stuck a fez on his head, and waited for me to take a picture. Once we realized the game, we were able to avoid the scams. It’s really a shame because you can easily imagine what the square was like hundred of years ago. People gathered, there was food, and storytellers, and it was a true experience. Now it seems like a staged circus.

    The maze of souks is still very interesting. All sorts of things for sale - loved the shoes and tangine crockery, the huge cones of spices, the buckets of delicious olives, etc. If you plan to shop do walk around and compare prices - the can really vary from stall to stall. At some the price was several times more than at another. However, if you see something you really, really want, buy it then because it may not be so easy to find the same souk again.

    Try some of the olives or sweets, juices, snail soup, etc. One of the nicer experiences is going to the second floor of one of the open air cafes surrounding the JEF. Order a cappuccino and enjoy people watching!

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  • vtveen's Profile Photo

    a magical magnet

    by vtveen Written Jan 22, 2008

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    Sunset over Jemaa el-Fna
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    Without any doubt the Jemaa el-Fna is by far the most important and vibrant square of Marrakech. It is located in the middle of the medina and nobody can (or will) miss it. The square is even declared a Unesco World Heritage Site. After our visit to Marrakech I still keep asking myself “what makes this square so special ?”.

    As a matter of fact Jemaa el-Fna is a very irregularly formed square, its surrounding building are not that fancy and still it is a kind of magical magnet for tourists and locals. Staying in one of the riads in the medina you certainly will stroll along Jemaa el-Fna at least once a day.

    During day time is filled with a lot of carts selling freshly squeezed orange juice (just for a couple of dirhams), herbs, dates, spice and nuts. Men and women under their umbrellas are trying to sell fruit or vegetables or other knickknacks. Water sellers want to earn some money and horse-drawn cabs are waiting for customers.

    But from 4.00 pm Jemaa el-Fna comes more and more to live: food stalls are build up, monkey-handlers, snake charmers, musicians, dancers, storytellers and shoeshine boys populate the square. More and more tourists and locals are strolling around. One can smell the perfumes of the food stalls.
    The best place to watch this vibrant and traditional way of Moroccan life is from one of the roof top cafés along Jemaa el-Fna drinking a strong Moroccan coffee or a traditional mint tea.

    Our Fondest Memory
    Without any doubt our most remarkable moment was watching the sunset over Jemaa el-Fna with a red coloured sky, the hustle and bustle of the people on the square and the Koutoubia Mosque in the background. Just marvellous !!

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  • cachaseiro's Profile Photo

    Mabye the most exciting square in the world.

    by cachaseiro Updated Jun 25, 2012

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    Djamaa el Fna at daylight.
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    Djamaa el Fna is the central square of the old part of Marrakesh and a place that is out of this world.
    The square really comes to live in the evening where the place is packed with musicians and story tellers who turns the square in to a surreal theater.

    There are also dozens of food stands in the evening ob the square that are extremely colorful and serves good morrocoan food.

    The square is also full of hustlers, but it's a part of the game there and as soon as you get used to having 50 guys shouting at you at the same time you will have a great time there.

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    • Theater Travel
    • Food and Dining

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Djemaa el Fna

    by MM212 Updated Nov 15, 2010

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    Food Sellers At Night
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    The heart and life of Marrakech, Djemaa el Fna is where everything happens! This enormous square occupies a central position in la Médina, the old city of Marrakech, and is the converging point of many of its streets and souks. It is an amazingly animated square, which is part theatre, part open-air restaurant, and part souk. It comes most alive in the evening when all the food sellers set up stalls for dinner. They cook harira soup, kebabs, tagines and other dishes in front of their clients for immediate consumption along tables and benches. Not too distant in the square, snakes and their charmers, monkeys, story tellers, orange juice vendors, drummers, and musicians all congregate and offer their services to the masses. Tourists are prime targets for them, but locals come here too. Beware, even taking pictures could cost you dirhams! The energy and sounds of Djemaa el Fna are just impossible to describe in words... but the video "Sounds of Marrakech" gives a glimpse of what it's like.

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  • mafi_moya's Profile Photo

    Djemaa el Fna

    by mafi_moya Updated May 20, 2004

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    Food stalls, snake charmers, storytellers, henna artists, monkeys, acrobats, medicine men, jugglers, musicians, pickpockets... the huge square of Djemaa el Fna has it all. Nights here are what cities must have been like back in mediaeval times, before television when people made their own entertainment.

    By day the square is relatively quiet and empty; as evening approaches the crowds gather and the food stalls are set up. As night falls, thousands of people take to the streets - feasting on the delicious food of the world's largest open air restaurant, listening to stories, or just hanging out with friends and a pot of mint tea.

    Love it or loathe it, Djemaa el-Fna has to be experienced at least once. And I say 'experienced' rather than 'seen' because Djemaa el Fna needs all the senses - tasting the food, smelling the spices and aromas, and hearing the endless noise of the horns.

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  • mafi_moya's Profile Photo

    Djemaa el-Fna... from above

    by mafi_moya Updated May 20, 2004

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    After you've wandered around the stalls, gorged on all the mouthwatering food and watched everything on the square it's time to retreat to one of the many cafes and watch the goings-on from a distance. In terms of views, though not of food, the best are the rooftop cafes. From here you can see the entire square: the smoky and brightly lit food stalls are the centre, but circles of locals form all around the square watching storytellers and actors, and around the edges are the juice stalls selling fresh orange juice. On the northern side are the souks - full of anything you could possibly want to buy, and lots of things you definitely don't!

    There are tourists aplenty in Djemaa el-Fna and it's tempting to dismiss it all as a commercial show, but the stories are all in Arabic and Berber and plenty of locals come here regularly as well. The monkeys, snake charmers and fortune tellers seem purely for the benefit of tourists though and you might find one evening here is enough - although most vistors come back night after night.

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  • Gillybob's Profile Photo

    Refreshing Orange Juice!

    by Gillybob Written Aug 23, 2007

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    Tricia enjoys a fresh orange juice
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    After walking around the souqs (and eventually finding your way back out), why not take a stroll through Place Djemma El Fnaa and enjoy a freshly squeezed orange juice from the plethora of vendors here. You will find plenty of carts stacked high with oranges (alongside others stacked with dates) - take your pick they all offer more or less the same.

    A fresh orange juice (cool and refreshing) will cost you around 3Dhs (June 2007 prices) and see you on your way to your next destination.

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  • MichaelFalk1969's Profile Photo

    Djemaa-al-Fnaa

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated May 26, 2008

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    Djemaa al Fna - Square

    During the day, Djemaa al Fnaa square is really nothing spectacular, just some stands selling freshly-pressed orange-juice. In the evening the square becomes a loud and colourful spectacle, with even more food stands, snake charmers, musicians, water sellers, henna artists, Berber fortune tellers, gambling and the like.

    There are plenty of cafes and restaurants with a rooftoop terrace, a great way to see the spectacle unfold while enyoing a drink or a meal. A cost-sensible choice would be the Cafe Glacier (though the service was lousy).

    Be aware though that
    - "artists" usually expect to be paid for a photograph, agree on a price beforehand (5-10 Dirham)
    - it seems that lots of pickpockets hang around at Djemaa al Fnaa. Take care of your wallet.

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  • jlfloyd's Profile Photo

    The heartbeat of the Medina

    by jlfloyd Written Jul 17, 2008

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    Djemma El Fna at Sunset
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    The Medina, or old town, is the most interesting place in Marrakech. Inside the Medina, the centerpiece is definately Djemma El Fna- the "Big Square," as it is often refered to by the locals and on signs in the Souk. You can do anything from get Henna, to watch cross dressing men dance, to eat snail soup. Here are a few tips that I think can help your time in the square go more smoothly, ones that I received from the Morocco owners of my hostel.

    The square is much more "hopin" at night, but is enjoyable all day long.

    1. You will be asked for money for many things. Watching performers and taking pictures especially will get a hat shoved in your face asking for Dirham. Its nice to give a few dirham for watching a show, but sometimes they will ask you for a ridiculous amount. Give no more than 10 dirham at a time, its fair. There are people with animals who you can take pictures with, like snakes and monkeys. Set a price before you take the pics. Again, 10 to 15 is fine. If they want more, walk away and they will mostlikely call you back and agree on your price.

    2. You can get Henna done from a number of women who sit on the square all day. These women are quite agressive as well, but find someone that is doing someone else whose looks good. Look throught their books and choose a designs and decide on a price before hand. Simple designs can be around 10 dirhams, while more intricant ones can go up to 50. Never pay more than 70 for something. They will try to say 200-500, but just walk away and they will pull you back, and you can start bargaining.

    3. Eating on the square is an even in itself, and there are plenty of places to choose from. make sure you know the prices for things. Nothing is ever free. Everything they put infront of you you will be charged for, even if you didnt order it. When they bring out appetizers or bread that you didnt order, you can politely tell them you dont want it and they will take it away. make sure you know the price you should owe, sometimes they will over charge you, especially if you ordered a lot and they think you dont know the exact price.

    4. There is a lot of stuff to buy and bargaining is expected. A good rule of thumb is that whatever price they say, divided it by four and thats around the real price you can bargain it down to. If you buy multiple items, you can bargain it down even more. Dont be rude to someone, if you can get it down to the price you want, walk around. The same stuff is sold all over the place.

    Marrakech is a great place and can be enjoyed, especially if you are prepaired for what you can expect.

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  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Snake Charmers In Djemma el-Fna Square

    by Mikebb Written Feb 15, 2009

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    Snake Charmer
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    We visited the main square around lunch time during Ramadan, the Muslim month of fasting. Our guide informed us that Djemma el-Fna square normally would be a hive of activity, however due to religious fasting most food stalls and activities will not appear to sunset when the fast is broken.

    We found the snake charmer with his 3 or 4 snakes in the middle of the square, the Cobras moving around under the "spell" of the music. Quite a sight and one that you have to pay for if you wish to take a photo. A few Dhiram will charm him and you can take a few photos. Beware if you do not give him some cash and attempt to take a photo.

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  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Bab Agnaou Gate

    by Mikebb Written Feb 15, 2009

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    Bab Agnaou Gate
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    This beautiful gate is the traditional entrance to the Kasbah, named after the black slaves brought from sub-Saharan Africa.

    The gate was built in 1185 and is one of the very few stone structures. It is in distinctive contrast to the mud brick city walls.

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Comments (1)

  • AmazigMarruecos's Profile Photo
    Oct 27, 2013 at 6:26 PM

    Lugar obligado de visitar, increíble lo que cada día sucede. Place bound to visit, incredible what happens each day

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