El Badi Palace, Marrakesh

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  • El Badi Palace
    by CDM7
  • Koubba El Khamsiniya and basins
    Koubba El Khamsiniya and basins
    by CDM7
  • Underground passageways
    Underground passageways
    by CDM7
  • CDM7's Profile Photo

    Badii Palace

    by CDM7 Updated Dec 9, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    At 10 dirhams for entry this is a must place for a visit.Once inside the palace you enter a peaceful retreat from the way of life outside.The only sound that we heard was the click click from the many storks that live around the palace walls.It is worth going up to the terrace from which you get nice views of Marrakech as well as getting an idea of the immense size of this complex.Going down to the underground passageways was also interesting as this is where the stables and dungeons were.

    Koubba El Khamsiniya and basins Underground passageways Storks on the Palace walls.
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    imagine the bygone glory days of El Badi Palais

    by angiebabe Updated Aug 7, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ive read reviews by visitors to El Badi saying theres nothing to see - the thing is, this is a historic site that was once a wonder of the Muslim world. and the meaning of El-BAdi is the 'Incomparable one' so it sounds impressive in name too.

    This enormous palace was built by Ahmed El Mansour (the Victorious) after a battle known as the Battle of the 3 kings in 1578 near Tangier - in which his brother was killed alongside an opposing Saadian sultan in league with the King of Spain who had sent his young nephew, the King of Portugal, to fight but was also killed.

    Ahmed el Mansour was also known as the 'Golden one' after this battle as he was able to ransom the Portugeuse to finance the building of his new palace!! Italian marble, Irish granite, Indian onyx and goldleaf decorating the walls and ceilings of the 360 rooms its no wonder Spain got rid of its alliance with Portugal!

    In 1683, Moulay Ismail (who I consider the bad boy of MOroccan history as he was truly ruthless and has some rather nasty stories from his days lording over his subjects) demolished Palais El-BAdi and used all the valuable materials to decorate his imperial city of Meknes.

    It is true there is not a lot remaining but the huge walls that surrounded show what an enormous place this was. There are still remains of rooms and underground dungeons and tunnels and some of the gardens. The area above the main entrance gate is still intact and you can take the stairways up for good views over the area and see the storks that return here for several months each year.
    Nice to be up on the walls around sunset - which is when my photos in this tip were taken.

    Remains of the old mosque with ancient minbar are visitable with an extra ticket.

    All in all one of the major historic must-sees to appreciate Marrakech.

    storks that live on the El Badi walls remains of huge rooms and walls of El Badi palace huge walls around the site remains of the gardens with orange trees and pools the entrance to El Badi
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    No much to see here .....

    by jlanza29 Written Mar 7, 2013

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    The old Royal Palace is only a shell now .... not much to see or do here ....towards the back there is a very interesting Muslim Staircase from the mid 1300's ... other than that the view from one of the roof is the best part of coming here .... you get to see the Atlas mountains towards the east and see the roof tops of the old medina ....

    Admission price is a low 20 dirhams ... about $2.50

    We walked around the whole complex in about 30 minutes .......

    not much to see or do here ....... Atlas mountains towards the east !!!! roof tops of the old medina

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    Palais Badia

    by smirnofforiginal Written Jan 3, 2013

    This palace was reputed to be the most beautiful in the world - difficult to imagine as you wander around the ruins. It was constructed between 1578 and 1602 and there was apparently there was marble from Italy and other materials from India. It was known as the Incomparable! In 1696 it was plundered for these fine materials and what you see today is all that remains.

    The remains are centred around a sunken orange grove and the storks who nest on the remains will look down and cry their woody cry to you!

    You don't need to much time here. It was around DH10 per person.

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    El Badi Palace

    by crazyman2 Written Jun 4, 2012

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    This palace was built in the 16th century. It was one extremely grand but was looted and left as a ruin by Moulay Ismail the following century.
    There are four huge, rectangular sunken gardens and two large rectangular pools.
    You can find the holes into which prisoners were thrown.
    Look up to see the storks on top of the walls ---they are good luck!
    It opens 8.30-11.45 then 2.30-5.45.
    The entrance fee is 10dh.

    Would I return there? Probably not ---but I'm pleased that I've been!

    part of the Monumental Hall And it still has beauty storks bring good luck ---just as in Holland our tour group

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    Palace El Badi (2) Koutoubia Minbar.

    by suvanki Updated Sep 12, 2009

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    The minbar is in a restored pavillion in the Palace El Badi, with exhibits of the minbar and its restoration.

    A minbar or Mimbar is the platform/pulpit where the Imam recites the Koran.

    Often they're small towers with a pointed roof and stairs. They are always placed to the right of the mihrab - a niche in the wall indicating the direction of Mecca, the direction for worshippers to face during prayer.
    Minbars are only used on Fridays, and otherwise remain locked away.

    Originally constructed in Cordoba, Spain in 1139, It was transferred in separate pieces to Marrakech by camel, where it was reconstructed.

    It consists of over a 1,000 single carvings of incredible complexity and pattern, not one is identical!

    Scripts from the Koran and geometric/ mathmatical patterns are contained in the work. It took 8 years to complete and is thought to be one of the finest examples of woodwork created by humans.


    Not only was it an amazing piece of craftsmanship, the assembled worshippers were stunned to see the minbar appear as if by magic during their Friday prayers - a series of pulleys and rails enabled this manouevre!

    The minbar was in continual use in 3 different mosques in Marrakech until 1962, when it was removed here for restoration.

    Restored by experts from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, in joint partnership with the Ministery of Cultural Affairs of Morocco.
    A documentary of the restoration won the gold trophy in 1998 in an arts film festival in S. France.

    For an account of the conservation work carried out and the history of the minbar this web page below is useful (I think this paper might have been one of the displays in the exhibition)- there are drawings and photos too

    http://aic.stanford.edu/sg/wag/1998/WAG_98_minor.pdf.

    I found that the minbar is behind a corded rail, which prevents viewing of most of the structure, and photography is forbidden - A security guard ensures this!

    Please see my previous El Badia Palace tip for more details of directions, opening times etc.

    Entrance to Pavillion and Koutoubia Minbar
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    Palace El Badi

    by suvanki Updated Sep 12, 2009

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    2 failed attempts to find the El Badi on my previous trip, I found it quite easily on my second trip.

    The Palace of "The Incomparable" or "The Marvel" its name isn't easily translated, was built on the orders of Ahmed El Mansour after defeat of the Portuguese in the Battle of 3 kings.
    Built 1578 to 1603, and paid for by ransom money from the Portuguese, Guinean gold and Sugar (which was exchanged for its equivalant weight in marble !)

    It's design was influenced by the Alhambra Palace in Granada.

    Italian marble, Rare woods from India, and Sudanese gold were used .Craftsmen from around the world were employed in construction and decoration. Its walls being covered with zillij tiles and carved stucco panels.

    360 rooms, courtyards, pools, orange groves and an underground prison were enclosed in the brick walls. The most impressive room being the Kabba el Khamsinyya- named due to its 50 columns- it was probably the Reception Hall for state visits.

    Sadly El Mansour died before completion of his dream.

    Sultan Moulay Ismail decided to a bit of re-cycling, and over 10 years in the 17th C, removed the valuable materials and craftwork for his palace in Meknes! Looks like he got a bit carried away, as today there is just the shell of the Palace, whose walls provide nesting space for the many storks.

    It is worth visiting to get an idea of the size, and you can get some idea of the layout from the foundations (and info plaques at strategic points) There are good views from the walls over the City into the Mellah, and you can clamber around the underground cells (bring a torch).
    Late afternoon, the storks (cignones) make quite an impressive sight soaring into the sky, before swooping earthwards.

    The treasure in the Palace now is the restored Koutoubia Minbar, considered to be one of the finest examples of wood working created by man in the world!

    May or June, the Palace is the main venue of the annual Folklore Festival.

    10dh admission to Palace + 10dh to see minbar

    Open 08.30 - 11.45, 14.45 - 17.45

    Palais El Badi Marrakech Palais El Badi Marrakech Underground prison Palais El Badi M'Kech Palais El Badi, Marrakech Entrance Gate Palais El Badi Marrakech
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  • MichaelFalk1969's Profile Photo

    Al Badi - Palace

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated May 28, 2008

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    This palace was built for Sultan Ahmed Al-Mansour in 1603. The name - roughly translated - means "the incomparable". The palace is now in ruins due to the fact that the later Sultan Moulay Ismail preferred Meknes as his favourite city, so he plundered Al Badi thoroughly in 1683. Al Badi remains a ruin, but it has a nice athmosphere, and one can still guess the splendor that it once must have radiated. On the crumbling walls plenty of storks are nesting. As an additional bonus, it is less crowded than most other sights in Marrakech.

    Al Badi Ruin Storks of Al-Badi
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    El Badi palace

    by call_me_rhia Written Jan 13, 2008

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    I found El Badi Palace quite interesting, although there's not much of it left - only the outer walls, in fact. But - because of its vast size, it can still igve you an idea of how magnificent the palace would have been. This palace was built by the Saadian king Ahmed el-Mansour in 1578, whose tomb you can visit nearby.

    The original building (which was built between 1578-1594) consisted of 360 rooms, a 135 m by 110 m courtyard and also a 90 m by 20 m pool - all richly decorated, of course. In what would have been the courtyard you can now see a large orange grove - so your visit will be a very perfumed one.

    Sadly this palace was destroyed by the Sultan Mawlay Ismail, who took away the best materials and decorations to ornate his own palace in Meknes.

    el badi palace - arch

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  • iwys's Profile Photo

    El Badi Palace

    by iwys Updated Apr 5, 2007

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    El Badi Place was constructed between 1578 and 1594 for Ahmed el Mansour, who ruled Morocco for 25 years. It was also known as "The Incomparable" because it was so magnificent. It was later destroyed and stripped of all its wealth by Sultan Moulay Ismail. Today there are still impressive ruins of this huge palace complex to be seen.

    Admission: 10dh or 20dh with the minbar

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    Palais el Badi

    by MM212 Updated Dec 9, 2006

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    Following his victories against the Portuguese in the 16th century, Yacoub el-Mansour ordered the construction of el Badi Palace, which was designed to be the largest and most sumptuous in Marrakech. If the Saadien Tombs of the same period are any indication, then el Badi Palace must have been that and more. Unfortunately, around 1700 during the rein of the Alaouites, Moulay Ismail ordered the destruction of el Badi along with other Saadian palaces. El Badi's decorations, however, were carefully removed and transported to Meknes where Moulay Ismail had moved the capital. The recovered materials were used to decorate palaces in his new capital Meknes. Despite being a ruin today, el Badi Palace is a very relaxing and picturesque spot worth exploring. Most astonishing is the sight of numerous storks nesting along the palace's ruined walls.

    Leftover Tiles Storks Over The Ruins
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    El Badi Palace: nobody here but us storks!

    by SallyM Written Jul 29, 2006

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    The El Badi Palace was built in the sixteenth century.

    It is now a ruin, with all the marble and tiling gone, but the thick walls remain, providing a useful nesting site for storks. The contrast between the noise in the streets outside, and the calm of the courtyard within is striking.

    El Badi Palace
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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    El Badi Palace

    by barryg23 Updated Jul 25, 2006

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    The Palace el-Badi was once said to be the most beautiful palace in the world. However, the years have not been kind, and today it's mostly in ruins. Most of the walls are still there, and the layout of the rooms is still somewhat intact but in general I think the best parts are probably gone.

    El Badi Palace

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  • Oana_bic's Profile Photo

    El badi palace

    by Oana_bic Written May 21, 2006

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    Construction of the El Badi Palace was ordered by the Saadien Ahmed el Mansour in 1578 and was not yet completed upon his death in 1603. The most precious materials that could be located were purchased for its creation, all the way to China. There is a beautiful view of Marrakech from the terraces.

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    The minbar.

    by belgianchocolate Updated Apr 14, 2005

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    This is the door of the summer residence of the
    badia palace.... behind this you can admire
    one of the highlights of Islamitic art.
    (but you can't take pictures).

    At the entrance of the palace you need to pay
    extra if you want to see this minbar.
    I didn't had a clue what to expect but I was
    glad I did.

    This minbar was already famous in it's time.
    It dates back from the 12th century and was
    restored recently. A minbar is a pulpit and this
    one used to be the one of the 'Koutoubia'.
    It was made in Cordoba (Spain) and has
    indeed magnificient woodcarvings.
    The minbar is also completely surrounded
    by arabian writings that had great information
    for the historice who examined this artwork.

    Nice was that there was a lot of information
    about the minbar with the history... pitty
    we could not get round it.

    It is easy to imagine that everybody was stunned
    by it's beauty since it was only used on friday
    and that it would drive itself outside a nich
    by an ingenious system of pulleys.

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