Saadian Tombs, Marrakesh

3.5 out of 5 stars 40 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Saadian Tombs, Marrakesh
    Saadian Tombs, Marrakesh
    by Airpunk
  • Saadian Tombs, Marrakech
    Saadian Tombs, Marrakech
    by antistar
  • Saadian Tombs - Hall of Twelve Colmuns
    Saadian Tombs - Hall of Twelve Colmuns
    by Airpunk
  • onlinerep's Profile Photo

    Saadian Tombs.

    by onlinerep Updated Jan 11, 2008

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Saadian Tombs were only discovered around the year 1917 and dates back from the time of the Great Sultan Ahmed El Mansour of the Saadi Dynasty. This excursion has become popular for the visitors who come to see the beautiful Arabic script, the colourful decor and carvings on the tombs.

    Was this review helpful?

  • sachara's Profile Photo

    Moroccan-Andalucian art

    by sachara Updated Oct 12, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Saadian Tombs are good examples of Moroccan-Andalucian decorative art. The central hall has columns of Italian marble. The entrance and the walls are beautifully decorated. On the picture you see a detail of the decorated wall.

    The tombs are open, daily in the morning and late afternoon. The admission fee is 10 dirham.

    Saadian Tombs, decorated walls
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • sachara's Profile Photo

    Tombeaux Saadiens

    by sachara Updated Oct 12, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In the south-west part of the medina nextdoor to the Kasbah Mosque are the Saadian Tombs, signposted as " Tombeaux Saadiens".

    This necropolis is started by Ahmed Mansour, the second Saadian sultan, in the 16th century, on the side of an older part of the cemetary, which was reserved for descendants of the Prophet.

    The mausoleum is divided in three halls. Ahmed Mansour and 65 of his successors and close family are buried under the two main structures.

    Saadian Tombs
    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • tim07's Profile Photo

    Saadian Tombs

    by tim07 Updated Sep 23, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    For 10 dirhams you enter an ancient walled garden to get peace from the crowds & shade from the afternoon sun. You are then free to take a peak into the tombs & the prayer hall to admire the ornate columns & tiles. The garden also has some wildlife. A family of cats, a pair of tortoise & an owl nesting in the walls.

    Inside Saadian Tombs Inside Saadian Tombs

    Was this review helpful?

  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    Saadian Tombs 2

    by suvanki Updated Jul 23, 2007

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Please see my tip above for history of Saadian Tombs, etc.

    The mausoleum is entered through a narrow passage way, which opens into a gardened area, surrounded by walls.

    The mausoleum consists of the garden (where over 100 tombs covered in mosaics lay amongst grassed areas) and three halls.

    The central structure, is The Hall of the Twelve columns, and is the most impressive. Carved cedar wood doors open into the vast space, where Columns of Italian Carrere marble rise to a vaulted roof.
    Here, are the remains of Ahmed al-Mansour (The former Sultan of the Saadian Dynasty and planner of this mausoleum) his son and grandson.

    A Marcharabia (carved wooden panel that traditionally separates the sexes) may also be seen.

    In the tombed area and along the outer walls are well preserved examples of brightly coloured zellij work (intricate mosaic designs, typical of Islamic and Andalucian architecture) with Koranic calligraphyand Stucco stalectite work .

    It is thought that the artwork was influenced by that of the Alhambra Palace in Granada. (This could probably explain why I was so underwhelmed when I visited The Alhambra a few months after my visit to Marrakesh - I'd already been stunned by the architecture and artwork here in Marrakesh!)

    Slightly apart from the other two, is the tomb of the Sultans mother, Lalle Massaoude. Built by her son, this was the site where the decapitated body of the founder of the Saadian Dynasty , Alol esh Sheikh was buried.

    The 100 tombs in the garden contain remains of other members of the royal family- including many children, and members of the Royal household's staff.

    The visit around the tombs doesn't take too long, (unless there's a large tour group - just wander around the gardens, and they'll soon be gone onto their next site)

    My second visit here there was a TV crew from NBC recording a series about Islamic countries and peoples opinions, so we had to wait while they filmed.c*

    Saadian Tombs, Marrakesh NBC Reporter in front of Lalle Massaoudas' tomb Stucco and zellij work, Saadian Tombs, Marrakesh Stucco panel, Saadian Tombs, Marrakesh Zellij tiles+ Koranic calligraphy, Saadian Tombs
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Saadian tombs

    by Raja500 Written Jun 14, 2007

    We visited this place but was disapointed that you can't go inside the main building where the tombs are housed, which is beautifully decorated and where people were lining up to take photos, from outside the building.

    Was this review helpful?

  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Saadian Tombs

    by barryg23 Updated Apr 15, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    These tombs are the resting place of the Saadian dynasty, who ruled Morocco in the 16th and 17th century. The best known of the Saadian sultans was Ahmed al Mansour, who came to prominence following a victory against the Portuguese. Over sixty of the Saadians, el Mansour among them, are buried in these richly decorated tombs.

    After the decline of the Saadinas, the tombs were left to fall into ruin by the Alaouites and were sealed by Moulay Ismail. They were rediscovered in the early twentieth century following an aerial survey by the French colonisers.

    Saadian Tombs Ruth at entrance to Saadian Tombs Saadian Tombs

    Was this review helpful?

  • iwys's Profile Photo

    Saadian Tombs

    by iwys Updated Apr 5, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Saadian tombs were rediscovered following a French aerial survey in 1917. Sultan Moulay Ismail had sealed them up, in his attempt to erase all memories of the Saadian dynasty. The earliest tombs here date back to 1557. The first mausoleum you see when you enter is the one that houses the tomb of Sultan Ahmed el Mansour. Altogether the tombs of more than a hundred members of the Saadian royal family are located here. These are the people who used to live in the adjoining El Badi Palace.

    Open daily 08.30-11.45 & 14.30-17.45

    Admission: 10 DH.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Tombeaux Saâdiens

    by MM212 Updated Dec 8, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Built in the 16th century by Ahmed "The Golden" over his father's tomb, the Saadian Tombs then became the burial ground for the Saadian dynasty and other notables. The beautiful burial chambers are a testament to the splendour of the Saadian period. When Moulay Ismail of the Alaouite dynasty later ruled Marrakech, he order the destruction of all of the palaces built by the Saadians, but dared not touch their tombs. Instead he walled them off and out of sight. The tombs were forgotten over the centuries only to be rediscovered in 1917. Today, they dazzle visitors by the magnificence of their arabo-andalusian architecture. For additional photos of this architectural wonder, check out my travelogue: Tombeaux Saadiens.

    Saadien Tombs
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Algaspar's Profile Photo

    CULTURE

    by Algaspar Updated Mar 5, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    OPEN 9:00-11:45 14:30-17:30 /18:00
    CLOSED TUESDAY

    THE STORY
    OPEN TO 1917 THERE ARE MUCH KOBBA AROUND CEMETERY
    THE FIRST MAUSOLEUM IT'S MAKE TO 3 HALL.
    THE SECOND HALL IS TOMB OF MOULAY AHMED EL MANSOUR (DEAD IN FE'S IN 1603)AROUND 12 COLUMMS MARBLE FROM CARRARA.
    THE THIRD HALL CALLED THREE NICHES HOST CHILDRE'S TOMB.
    THE SECOND MAUSOLEUM HOST THE TOMB'S MOTHER OF MOULAY AHMED EL MANSOUR.
    tHE GARDEN IS SPECIAL OASIS.

    MAUSOLEUM

    Was this review helpful?

  • tini58de's Profile Photo

    Saadian Tombs

    by tini58de Updated Feb 5, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Saadian Tombs have been missing for hundreds of years and only been rediscovered a few years ago! There had been a wall built around it - since a graveyard could not be distroyed for ethical reasons!

    The story around this place was the most fascinating part for me - the gravesite itself was not as spectacular as I had hoped it to be!

    You get to see a graveyard and a couple of rooms with tombs in them.

    Entrance fee is 10 DH = 1 € (2006)

    Saadian Tombs Saadian Tombs Saadian Tombs

    Was this review helpful?

  • belgianchocolate's Profile Photo

    A highlight in burial decoration.

    by belgianchocolate Updated Apr 11, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness


    First complete day...we took the taxi and
    had us dropped of in front of the 'saadian tombs'.

    These tombs are one of the most artistic
    monuments in Morocco. Moulay Ismaïl didn't
    dare to destroy these graves...but he didn't want
    anybody to see them. Moulay Ismaïl was the next
    ruler after the Saadian dynasty. He destroyed the
    palace 'el Badi' and used pieces of it to decorate
    his own palace. The Saadian tombs , he had
    them immured.

    It was after 300 years that the tombs were rediscovered
    in 1917. And they are in amazing shape.


    They made a special entrance for tourists
    since entering through the moskee is a big nono.
    10 dirham to admire these treasures is
    peanuts if you ask me.


    You arrive in a peaceful garden with little
    sober white tombs in the grass. In the middle ,
    where the picture is taken , you can find the
    tomb of the Sultans mother , 'Lalla Massaouda'.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • chrisvandenbroucke's Profile Photo

    Saaidan Tombs, garden tombs

    by chrisvandenbroucke Written Nov 25, 2004

    0.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When you're not famous or not descending from a royal f amily, you're surely to be buried in the nice garden around the Saaidan Tombs.
    It's a lovely courtyard and I think I'd prefer to lie outside (it's a lot warmer there)

    Saadan Tombs, garden
    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • chrisvandenbroucke's Profile Photo

    Wonderful Main Hall

    by chrisvandenbroucke Written Nov 25, 2004

    1 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The guide we were listening to ( I never ask or pay for a guide..) compared the Main Hall of the Saaidan Tombs to the most marvellous buildings in Spain's Granada.

    I agree, the decorative work is fenomenal and the tombs are well carved.

    You shouldn't miss this

    Main Hall of Saaidian Tombs
    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mafi_moya's Profile Photo

    Saadian tombs

    by mafi_moya Updated May 20, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Saadians were an Arabian dynasty that ruled much of southern Morocco in the 16th and 17th centuries, often successfully waging war against Portuguese invaders. Marrakech was their capital.

    Sultan Ahmed al-Mansour created these tombs for himself, his family and ancestors. In total nearly 200 Saadians are buried here, most in the yard and the most important in the lavishly decorated halls. The tombs were sealed and only rediscovered in 1917 so their original splendour is still intact and the intricate detail is pretty breathtaking.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Marrakesh

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

41 travelers online now

Comments

View all Marrakesh hotels