Meknes Things to Do

  • cedar carvings, Bou Inania Medersa, Meknes
    cedar carvings, Bou Inania Medersa,...
    by EviP
  • courtyard, Bou Inania Medersa, Meknes
    courtyard, Bou Inania Medersa, Meknes
    by EviP
  • view on top of Bou Inania Medersa, Meknes
    view on top of Bou Inania Medersa,...
    by EviP

Most Recent Things to Do in Meknes

  • Bernhadette's Profile Photo

    Bab Berdayin: A Forgotten Gem

    by Bernhadette Updated Jun 17, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you walk to the northern part of the Medina, leaving the usual touristic
    areas behind, the souks will get poorer and muddier. Beyond the
    Mosque El Berdayin there is the Place El Berdayin, that looks rather like
    a large parking-lot, with some small shops and an internet-café.

    At the upper part of the Place El Berdayin you will find the Bab Berdayin
    ("Gate of the saddlers"). It was built at the times of Moulay Ismail at the end
    of the 17th century. With just one arch, it is not as large as the famous
    Bab Mansour, but on the outside it is beautifully decorated with green inlays.
    Unfortunately there have been no restauration works yet, so the gate starts
    to crumble.

    From the outside of the Bab Berdayin you have a great view upon the plains
    of northern Meknès with the Oued Boufekrane and the mountains behind.
    A way leads down to the Boulevard Circulaire.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Bernhadette's Profile Photo

    Place Administrative: View at the Medina skyline

    by Bernhadette Updated Jun 17, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you want to take a little stroll in the Ville Nouvelle stop by the Place Administrative. Here you find the city-hall ("Hôtel de Ville"), the Tribunal ("Palais de Justice") and the main post office. The buildings that flank the square are nothing spectacular. They are built with the uniformity of modern city architecture, except one apartment building, designed by Le Corbusier.
    In the middle of the place there is a pretty, artificial basin, where you can stop and rest. Here the Meknassi meet in the evening.

    If you cross the Avenue Bengazi from the south side of the Place Administrative you get to a quite run-to-seed side-strip. From here you have a beautiful view at the Medina skyline. Unfortunately the view is somewhat marred by a wire-fence, but in the evening when the sun sets and the call for prayers starts the atmosphere is enchanting.

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Bernhadette's Profile Photo

    Bassin de l'Agdal: Repose a bit....

    by Bernhadette Updated Jun 17, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The "Bassin de l'Agdal" on the fringes of the "Ville Impériale" is a popular outing for the Meknassi, especially young families and the youth. A bit apart from the scope of parents and neighbors the young have here found a place to meet and promenade.
    The Alaouite Sultan Moulay Ismail (1672-1727) had this large artficial basin built as a place of pleasure and recreation for his court. It is also said to have served for the irrigation of the palaces' parcs and gardens.
    After an exhausting visit to the Medina and the "Ville Impériale" it's a nice place for reposing, even though it is a bit scant of green.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

    Was this review helpful?

  • Bernhadette's Profile Photo

    Place El Hedim

    by Bernhadette Updated Jun 4, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In order to get from the Bab Mansour to the museum Dar Jamai, you have to cross the "Place El Hedim" ("Square of Destruction"). Legend has it that the name originated in Sultan Moulay Ismail's building activities. He had torn down a number of houses that originally were part of the medina in order to form a large, presentable forecourt for the entrance to the Ville Impériale. It is said that initially the construction waste was piled on the premisses of the Place.
    Nowadays it is a center for merchants and street hawkers, who offer bits and pieces for the tourists, and still not in its best condition.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • grets's Profile Photo

    Moulay Ismail's Tomb

    by grets Written May 30, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The walls and courtyard (the only places to be open) are highly patterned and has some striking stucco work.

    Many people believe that Moulay Ismail's tomb has baraka (magical powers) which will be bestowed on the believer. There is a cemetary next door where the faithful may be buried.

    Was this review helpful?

  • grets's Profile Photo

    Bab Mansour Gate

    by grets Written May 30, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Moulay Ismail commissioned the gate himself, but it was not completed until after his reign in 1732. The gate is beautifully decorated in green and white ceramic tiling, and is flanked by two square bastions supported in part by marble columns taken from Volubilis.

    Was this review helpful?

  • grets's Profile Photo

    Royal Stables

    by grets Written May 30, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Royal stables were built by Moulay Ismail in the 17th century to house more than 12,000 horses, each with its own groom and slave. Their grain was kept below in the granaries at a constant temperature assured by the thick walls. A canal provided fresh water for the horses without them having to move from their stables. The horse was considered one of the noblest animals.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Volubilis

    by yoshimi Written Feb 25, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Volubilis was built during the Roman Empire and has been inhabited until the 18th century. It gives a good idea of how life was at that time. The site is similar to Jerash in Syria and Ephesus in Turkey but mosaics are better in Volubilis.
    To get to Volubilis, you can hire a "grand taxi". The ride between Meknès and Volubilis is 30 minutes long and 2 hours are plenty to visit Volubilis. We manage to get a taxi and 2 hours on site for 150 Dh (US$15).
    Price: 20 Dh/pers (US$2)

    Mosaics in Volubilis
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Bou Inania Madrassa

    by yoshimi Written Feb 25, 2003

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This Muslim theological school, built in the 14th century, is in really bad condition so if you have already visited a Moroccan madrassa, you can pass on this one.
    Price: 10 Dh/pers
    Open daily: 9am - 12pm / 3pm - 6pm

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mausoleum of Moulay Ismael

    by yoshimi Written Feb 25, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Moulay Ismael who made Meknes Morocco's capital in the 17th century is buried in this magnificent building. It's used as a mosque but non Muslims can get in. Don't miss this site because it's well preserved and it has a soul!
    Price: up to you, it's a donation to the mosque.
    Open daily except on Friday morning: 9am - 12pm / 3pm - 6pm

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Dar Jamai and Bab El Mansour

    by yoshimi Written Feb 25, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Rug museum. Dar Jamai palace, built in 1882, is in really bad conditions. It has been used as an hospital during the French protectorat so it might explain why it has been damaged.
    You can use Dar Jamai ticket to get inside Bab El Mansour and Koubbat As Sufara where more rugs are shown.
    Price: 20 Dh/pers (US$2) for the 3 sites
    Dar Jamai museum is located on the medina main square (El Hedim square)
    Bab el Mansour is on the same square, across from Dar Jamai.
    Koubbat As Sufara is behind Bab El Mansour, ask Bab el Mansour museum personnel to get directions.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • grets's Profile Photo

    Wool market

    by grets Written May 30, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    At one end of the souk is the wool market, where you can see baskets upon basket of wool waiting to be prepared into threads, dyed and then woven into carpets.

    Was this review helpful?

  • grets's Profile Photo

    Horses

    by grets Written May 30, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Just a few horses ar kept in the Royal Stables these days, and mainly as a tourist attraction. As part of our tour we were shown the various horses, Arabs, Berbers and a mix of the two.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Meknes

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

105 travelers online now

Comments

Meknes Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Meknes things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Meknes sightseeing.

View all Meknes hotels