Rabat Local Customs

  • Local Customs
    by jayjayc
  • Local Customs
    by jayjayc
  • Local Customs
    by Robin020

Most Recent Local Customs in Rabat

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    Mohamed V University

    by JLBG Updated Nov 13, 2004

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    This is the oldest Sciences University of Morocco. The other Rabat University is on a Campus, a little outside of the town. It is 300 m away from Bab er Rouah. Have a look at their web page Université Mohammed V. The Institut Scientifique is the main research center in Morocco and is side by side with the University.

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    • Architecture

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    Parc du Triangle de vue

    by JLBG Updated Nov 13, 2004

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    The "Parc du Triangle de vue" belongs too to Liautey's project. This Park is along the Andalous's wall, on the other side of Hassan II Boulevard. It is very quiet and fresh, with much shade. Unfortunately, it closes at 6PM whatever the season.

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    General Post Office

    by JLBG Updated Nov 13, 2004

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    The General Post Office is a beautiful building, built around 1920, close to the railway station, on Mohamed V Avenue. In 1912, Liautey, General governor of Morocco decided to build a modern town, side by side to the medina. Most of the buildings on Mohamed V avenue, including the Post Office, have been built under this project.

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    • Architecture

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  • Henna Ladies

    by Urban_Kitten Written Jan 5, 2004

    "Henna ladies" (as I like to call them) are ubiquitous in Morocco. Often they will aggressively grab your hand in an effort to start the hennaing process before you can say "no" or strike a price. I found that the best way to deal with this is to have your hands hennaed at the very first opportunity (either back home or when you first land in Morocco). When a Henna Lady grabs your hand and sees that someone has beaten her to you, she'll back off immediatel ... it's easier than saying no over & over again.

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  • You must must have some French...

    by Louby Written Aug 24, 2002

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    You must must have some French when travelling in Rabat. Unlike Casablanca or Marrakech, visitors from countries other than France are rare and you can't rely on English to get around. A few Arabic words would be even better, of course.

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    'Hey look! Your collar bone...

    by Krystynn Written Aug 24, 2002

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    'Hey look! Your collar bone is showing!'

    Well, cosmopolitan women traveling in Morocco are not expected to dress like traditional Moroccan women, and indeed, many sophisticated or foreign-educated Moroccan women have now adopted European fashion styles themselves... esp. in Rabat and Casablanca. However, no matter how snug those pants or how long your skirt length is, you must always try and keep your collar bone covered up. I guess it's the culture thingy again....

    So pack carefully. Your lovely V-neck sweaters and t-shirts, no matter how chaste (ahem!) you may think they look, may be interpreted as risqué, disrespectful OR inappropriate in Morocco. I kid you not!

    And when you have Moroccan men tailing after you for 2 hours, I guarantee you'd definitely wisen up!!!!
    :-)

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    Drinking Water: The water...

    by Krystynn Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Drinking Water:

    The water is NOT SAFE TO DRINK here in Morocco. So... don't even DRINK the FRUIT JUICES here (because once something has been mixed with water, it's 'contaminated').... One of my greedy girlfriends drank a glass of orange juice from our hotel's restaurant and she suffered from severe stomache for the rest of the day. Sigh...

    In a restaurant, ask for a bottle of mineral water UNOPENED. Have them open it at your table and you can be sure you won't get local water ... bottled. :-)

    Most people know how to ask for unopened bottled water when traveling in areas where the drinking water is
    not safe, but they may not realize that it's all too easy to get sick from ingesting water while showering,
    even if trying to keep one's mouth closed.

    The solution? Always keep mouthwash in your mouth while showering. It will help you remember to keep your mouth closed and the antibacterial agent in it will help purify any water that gets in anyway (e.g. through your nose).

    For me, I used mineral water (costing 10 dirhams per large bottle... very cheap!) to brush my teeth and to wash my face. I don't want to take any chances because I don't want to fall ill in a foreign land.

    P.S. The water is safe to the locals who are used to it. This doesn't matter if you're a resident of Morocco or the UK: remember, to the residents living in the country, the water is safe.... but not to the travelers! Our tummy's not accustomed to it yet. All water contains different sets of microbes and
    mineral deposits, even in the US. If you aren't used to a country's drinking water, then you may get
    sick just because it is different.

    Be safe, buy bottled water cheap at the supermarket.


    Please also DON'T trust the locals in a developing country to tell you that their water is safe to drink. Again, for them, it is safe to drink. For you, it probably isn't. The price is small compared to what could be a disastrous effect on your trip by
    drinking the local water. When in doubt, play it safe!

    Photo Below: That's me bending down a little so I wouldn't block the lovely view BEHIND me.... Yes, that's the city center of RABAT.

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    Visiting Souks & Bazaars:...

    by Krystynn Updated Aug 24, 2002

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    Visiting Souks & Bazaars:

    When you're planning to visit bazaars and souks, but you don't like to be hassled and pestered incessantly by vendors (and Moroccan men) all the time, here's a tip: pick out one of those so-called students/ kids that offer to guide you around. Make it clear to him you want to walk and look around but don't plan to buy anything.

    You pay him a little amount of money i.e. 10 dirhams (US$1) and he'll help keep the vendors (and yes, men) off. And another added plus is that you won't get lost in these dark, narrow streets (they all seem to look the same)!

    Be Savvy!

    When visiting a foreign city like RABAT, do carry along a postcard with the name and address of
    your hotel, which you can show to cab drivers or when asking for directions (should you lose your way).

    Speak Their Lingo!

    There are not many places where the people aren't absolutely delighted for you to try out their language. If you use just the word for 'thank you', they'll still be impressed. If you know
    more about their language, even if you are not fluent, you'll find yourself learning more about the real people, not just the ones shown to us in movies! These Moroccans are just as curious about us as we are about them. So, if you can speak FRENCH and ARABIC, now's the time to do it! :-)

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    Tipping

    by Robin020 Written Mar 6, 2012

    There is not really a tipping policey in Morocco,its up to you to tip.
    but tip is always appreciated and thanked for.
    I was tipping when the service was good.

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    Men kissing each others cheecks and hold hands

    by Robin020 Written Mar 6, 2012

    Its normal to see men kiss each other when they meen is nothing sexual.Just traditonal and culture.
    even hold hands when in public
    in the begening I was surprised but I got use to it.

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    Storks

    by grets Written May 8, 2005

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    The area in and around the fortifications at Chella, is very popular with storks, and you can usually see at least one nest on the hillside. Here, there are two nests on the same building.

    Storks' nest

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