Rabat Local Customs

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Best Rated Local Customs in Rabat

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    The amphitheaters

    by JLBG Updated Nov 13, 2004

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    The amphitheaters bear names that are not familiar for us.
    Ibn Sina is the best known, under the altered name of Avicenna. He was a philosopher and doctor from Iran (980-1037), one of the most famous Arab scholars. His book ''canon of medicine'' collected all the knowledge of the ancient Greeks and added much new knowledge. It was used in Europe until the XVII century.
    Abu Ja'far Muhammad ibn Musa al-Khawarizmi was possibly born in 780 in Baghdad, died around 850. He was a major mathematician (algebra, geometry and astronomy). His masterpiece book is the ''Kitab fi hisab Al Jabr w'al muqâbala'', issued in 830, from which title comes the word ''algebra'' (Al Jabr). His altered name (Al Khawarizmi) gave the name ''algorithm'', used in mathematics.
    Ibn al-Baytar was probably the most influential medieval writer on botany and pharmaceutics. Born at Malaga in the kingdom of Granada, he studied at Seville. He composed a book on medicinal substances titled Kitab al-Mughni fi al-adwiyah al-mufradah (The Ultimate in Materia Medica) and an enormous dictionary of simple medicaments and foodstuffs (Kitab al-Jami‘ li-mufrdat al-adwiyah wa-al-aghdhiyah). The latter was an alphabetical guide to over 1,400 medicaments in 2,324 separate entries, taken from his own observations as well as over 260 written sources, which he quoted.

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    Mohamed V University

    by JLBG Updated Nov 13, 2004

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    This is the oldest Sciences University of Morocco. The other Rabat University is on a Campus, a little outside of the town. It is 300 m away from Bab er Rouah. Have a look at their web page Université Mohammed V. The Institut Scientifique is the main research center in Morocco and is side by side with the University.

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    Water seller and no women

    by matcrazy1 Written Jul 27, 2005

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    WATER SELLER AT THE MEDINA, RABAT

    I met this guy, on my picture, walking along main street of the medina called Rue Souika. He weared a strange, colorful hat and long, red dress/jellabia and he carried a leather bag for fresh water. He was the first water seller I met in Morocco, quite popular profession in larger cities. Warning: they used to order money not only for water sold but for taking pictures as well.

    The other local custom, I was surpriced to see in the capital of Morocco refers to lack of local women walking on streets of the medina. 95% folks I passed by were guys or kids (boys!). The women used to stay at home, prepare food for a family and they walk on a street (often in a group of 2-3 women) mainly to do some shopping or to walk kids to/from a school. It works different in less traditional Ville Nouvelle.

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    White guard

    by matcrazy1 Written Jul 29, 2005

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    WHITE GUARD OF MAUSOLEUM OF MOHAMMED V

    There are guards in front of of Mausoleum of Mohammed V which are dressed in traditional costumes: mostly white with green, black and red addings. The most characteristic element of the costume is a green hat and white cape. Add old-fashioned gun of the guard.

    Well, the picture of the guard and with him is a must for most visitors to Rabat, I am sure.

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    City of young folks

    by matcrazy1 Written Jul 27, 2005

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    YOUTHS AT RABAT'S STREET

    Morocco is a country of young people in general. But nothing compare to Rabat. I have never seen as many youths in any Moroccan city as in Rabat. Well, it's a main educational city of Morocco and there are many students there. For a visitor it means that there are many (as for Morocco =... a few) night clubs and discos for young folks.

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    Poor cats and dogs of Rabat

    by matcrazy1 Written Jul 28, 2005

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    MY CAT MET IN THE GARDENS OF THE KASBAH

    Walking tiny off the beaten path streets of the medina I saw a strange and a bit horrible scene. I saw a local street stalls keeper selling fish, who caught a cat with a fish in a mouth. Probably the fish was just stolen by the cat. The guy was crying something and kicked the cat with his feet and with all his strenght. At first I thought he killed the cat. But no, the poor animal escaped.

    Hmm... it seems that "useless" animals of Rabat, like cats and dogs have poor life there. I saw a few of them, probably homeless... It works better with, say, donkeys used (rarely) for transportation goods in the medina. When I met a little, thin and hungry cat in the gardens of the Kasbah of the Oudaya, I fed him with my sandwiches.

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    Henna

    by Doctor38 Updated Jul 9, 2008

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    For 30 dh you can have something similar to this tattoo painted to you hands. You'll find them at the Ouedaia’s Andalusian garden. It will take around 20 minutes for the process. It will take few hours for the Henna to dry out. The color will last few days.

    Henna is prepared in various ways. Some people just add boiled water. Some add herbs and spices. Some add petroleum products or dyes. Henna is used by both men and women esp. to dye white hair. Henna is still used in weddings. There is a special night called the Henna night in most Middle Eastern countries and the Indian Sub-continent. Henna is also used in religious celebrations in Muslim, Jewish, Christian and Hindu festivities. Henna has lots of medicinal values and is very popular in alternative medicine.

    Trace’s of Henna was found on women as far as the Bronze Age in Syria. Henna was first mentioned in Historical text of Ugarit around 2000 B.C. Ugarit is located near Ladhiqyya in modern day Syria, in connection with the fertility celebration. It was also mentioned that the goddess Manat used in celebration of the victory of her husband, the Phoenician God, Baal over his enemies.

    Henna is known as Lawsonia inermis, It grows in Morroc, Middle East, the indian Sub-continent and Austeralia. Allergies to Henna are very very rare, when they do occur, the are of the mild skin rash type

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    Colorful royal staff

    by matcrazy1 Written Jul 29, 2005

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    COLORFUL STAFF OF THE ROYAL PALACE, RABAT

    I took this picture at the entrance gate to the Royal Palace, well, it was not at all allowed... :-)

    From the left:
    - two white guards of the Royal Palace in blue hats armed with both a gun and small arm
    - two black guards wearing dark green berets,
    - a member of the staff of the Royal Palace in white jellabia, dark red hat (called "fez") and funny, yellow, slippers-like shoes.

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    Royal costume

    by matcrazy1 Written Jul 29, 2005

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    ROYAL GUARD OF MAUSOLEUM OF MOHAMMED V

    There are royal guards dressed in typical royal costumes in front of Mausoleum of Mohammed V. Green colour of the traditional royal dress symbolises royality while the red one, dark red, is a colour of Morocco and its national flag. The round and flat hat of the guards remind me traditional French hats weared by policemen. No wonder, there are many French influences in Morocco which was part of France till 1956.

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    Local folks

    by matcrazy1 Written Jul 27, 2005

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    LOCALS IN THE MEDINA

    Rabatians (is it correct word ?) are a bit different than folks I met in other Moroccan cities. Just a few observations:

    - most local guys wear in non-traditional (I mean muslim jellabias) way; younger folks in jeans or even shorts + T-shirt; older generations love simple grey or black jackets; if you want to see locals in jellabias take a bus/taxi or drive to Sale across the river;

    - more locals (but still minority) can speak English;

    - fewer shop keepers bother visitors and I didn't meet any "guide" or "parking guard" in Rabat :-).

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    Rabat Downtown

    by Bernhadette Updated Sep 24, 2006

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    Avenue Mohammed V. - ��Bernhadette

    One of the main streets in Rabat,
    the Avenue Mohammed V.

    Rabatis love to promenade here in the afternoon. You'll find a lot of cafés, some large hotels, the train station and the main post office.

    If you follow the avenue to the south, it will lead you to the Great Mosque.
    If you walk up north, you will get to the Boulevard Hassan II, and enter the Medina through the Bab El Djedid.

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    General Post Office

    by JLBG Updated Nov 13, 2004

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    The General Post Office is a beautiful building, built around 1920, close to the railway station, on Mohamed V Avenue. In 1912, Liautey, General governor of Morocco decided to build a modern town, side by side to the medina. Most of the buildings on Mohamed V avenue, including the Post Office, have been built under this project.

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    Parc du Triangle de vue

    by JLBG Updated Nov 13, 2004

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    The "Parc du Triangle de vue" belongs too to Liautey's project. This Park is along the Andalous's wall, on the other side of Hassan II Boulevard. It is very quiet and fresh, with much shade. Unfortunately, it closes at 6PM whatever the season.

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    Welcome in my country

    by hat53 Updated Apr 6, 2007

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    Donýt be surprised if people in the street start talking to you or greet you. We met several people that asked us where we were from and then welcomed us, or even without asking: Welcome in my country.

    The correct way to anwser is: Marocco is a beautifull country.

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    Morrocan whisky

    by Robin020 Written Mar 6, 2012

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    During my stay in Morroco,I met some locals and one of them had a wicked sense of humour and invited me to have some Moroccan whisky.at a cafe.
    So we went after he ordered it was nothing but mint tea.
    and he started to laugh I was wondering whats going know he told the Moroccan whisky is the mint tea hahaha was fun.
    So they call the mint tea Moroccan whisky.

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Rabat Local Customs

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