Rabat Shopping

  • DATES AND FIGS TO BUY
    DATES AND FIGS TO BUY
    by matcrazy1
  • Shopping
    by keeweechic
  • Shopping
    by keeweechic

Most Recent Shopping in Rabat

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    Shopping

    by keeweechic Written Dec 30, 2008

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    Rabat can be very modern with its shops but of course the best places to see local crafts and clothing are the street markets or the Medina (old city or Souk). Most open around 9.00am and can be open until around 7.00am. Some will close during the day for about two or three hours during the middle of the day. You will find anything like jewellery, carpets and rugs, traditional and fake designer clothes and other goods, crafts, leather and second hand goods.

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    The Markets

    by keeweechic Written Dec 28, 2008

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    There are several markets to visit. Just off Hassan II avenue is the Municipal Market, has vegetables, fruit and herbs/spices. The medina of course which are best on Sundays. Near the University is the Agdal Market (off Av des Dades. There are also several local markets at Sale (on Av de 11 Janvier) on a Thursday, Bouznika on Friday, Temara on Saturdays and Bouknadel and Skhirat on Sundays.

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    The Jalaba or Jellaba

    by keeweechic Written Dec 28, 2008

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    The Jalaba or Jellabas is a traditional dress of Morocco. It is more like an robe or overcoat with a hood. Both men and women wear the Jalaba but can be different colours and materials. The Jabador is a two piece outfit.

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    Souq, Rue Des Consuls & Ensemble Artisanal

    by Doctor38 Updated Jul 9, 2008

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    The Souq is located in the Old medina. If you are walking along Mohammed V and after you cross rue Hassan II you'll come to Marche Cenral, few meters later to your right will be Rue Rue Souika to your right. The souq has shops selling all kinds of stuff for the locals.

    If you are looking for souvineres you should go to Rue Des Consuls. It is called that way becasue in the 19 th century deplomates used to live in this area. To get to it walk in Rue Souika and You'll reach it. You'll recognize it from the iron roof as you see it in the 2nd picture. There are few carpet shops along this road plus the other stuff for tourists.

    Your other option for gifts and souviniers is Ensemble Artisanal which is located behind the Rue des Consuls, just opposite to the Ouedaia. It is very close to the Rue Des consuls, if you have any difficulties just ask.

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    Used Books in Arabic, English and French

    by Doctor38 Updated Jul 9, 2008

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    Librarie Dakhair Al-Maghreb

    Finding old book about morocco is not so easy elsewhere but easy in morocco. You can find some very good books. There are 2 used bookshops I know of in Rabat.

    One of them is Libraries Dakhair Al-Maghreb (see the picture). It has books in Arabic and French. It is the best place in terms of organization and knowledge. Here you can find old books about morocco not found elsewhere. It is located near Bab Alhad, on Rue Lebnane, off Rue Al Maghreb Al Arabia. 037 20 89 59, mobile 067 32 03 07.

    The other book shop is English book shop, 7 Rue Al yamamah, behind the train station 037 706 593. Mostly used English books. As soon as you exit the train station turn right, and then turn right immediately on Rue Baghdad. Walk parallel to the train tracts to the end and turn left before you get to the city walls. Walk 20 meter and you'll see rue Al yamamah on you left hand.

    You other option is Darb Ghallaf in Casablanca, see my Casablanca shopping tips

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    The souks are best.

    by colin_bramso Updated Mar 21, 2008

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    Wonderful fresh dates.

    Souk is Arabic for market, and I think markets are the best places for shopping. Not only for souvenirs but this is where the local people shop for their daily needs so there's clothing, fresh fruit, electronics - just about everything you need.

    What to buy: Fresh dates are one of my favourite fruits, so I always buy some.

    What to pay: Don't forget to bargain!

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    Shops and street stalls in the medina: Other local craft

    by matcrazy1 Updated Nov 5, 2006

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    CERAMICS AND OTHER LOCAL CRAFT

    The main shopping area for local craft is located in southwestern part of the medina close to the Grand Mosque and along Rue Souika and Rue des Consuls close to their junction. There are a few smaller covered shopping streets there.

    Usually a few neighbouring shops sell the same kind of goods: pottery, silver jewelry (oposite to the Grand Mosque), copperware etc. In contrast to, say, the medina in Fes, there are not many places to see local craftmen at work on streets of Rabat's medina.

    What to buy: I paid attention to some ceramics and some strange in shape, old looking, metal or copper pots and containers.

    What to pay: Depends on your time, patience and bargaigning skills :-)

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    Suques in the medina: Wooden, secret and unique

    by matcrazy1 Updated Nov 5, 2006

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    SECRET PIECE OF WOOD

    A few shops (suques) in the medina, especially close to the Grand Mosque, offered some unique (at least for me) local or... fake local craft.

    What to buy: Urszula liked a lot thick pieces of wood with Arabic patterns and inscriptions carved and painted on both sides. They reminded me wooden pages (manuscripts) of very old books but the pages were not flat but a bit round in shape. I have no idea what was that but looked interesting, indeed. Well, maybe it's a copy of old Koranic manuscript.

    What to pay: Depends on your time, patience and bargaigning skills :-). Excuse, I had no time to do that and the first price is no price.

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    Suques in the medina: Iron lamps

    by matcrazy1 Updated Nov 5, 2006

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    IRON LAMPS

    There are numerous shops (suques) selling local or... fake local craft along main streets of the medina: Rue Souika and Rue des Consuls, especially close to their junction. It's a touristy shopping area.

    What to buy: I paid special attention to iron or metal round and square lamps put on the ground in front of some shops.

    What to pay: Well, I even asked about the price of one lamp, Urszula liked most ($40 or so). But, you know, it takes at least 30 min. of busy bargaigning to receive the last price (maybe $15 or $ 20 ?). Being a bit in a hurry I skipped it.

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    Street stalls: Mentha for... Moroccan vodka

    by matcrazy1 Updated Nov 5, 2006

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    MENTHA LEAVES ON A STREET STALL

    There are green street stalls among others along the main street of Rabat's medina called Rue Souika. The shop keepers sell mentha leaves which are used to make the most popular and the cheapest Moroccan drink that is meantha tea, sometimes called... Moroccan vodka.

    What to buy: Fresh mentha leaves per kilo for use in Morocco or in plastic bags for use at home. I bought one bag and I forgot to use it on time... It's a pity, numerous mentha tea bags taste different and fresh mentha leaves are not available in my hometown.

    What to pay: Very, very cheap.

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    Food stalls: Moroccan dates and figs

    by matcrazy1 Updated Nov 5, 2006

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    DATES AND FIGS TO BUY

    There are numerous food stalls along the main street of Rabat's medina called Rue Souika. In contrast to many other Moroccan cities the shop keepers almost didn't bother me in Rabat.

    What to buy: As usual during my travels, I was interested in local food. So, I paid attention to fresh and sweet figs (delicious) and very sweet dates which are either not available or very expensive in groceries around my place. Hmm... better wash them exactly before eating.

    What to pay: Cheap: 20 - 50 dirhams per kilo (2 pounds) of dates and 20 - 30 dirhams for figs (per kilogram).

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    Medina

    by barryg23 Updated Jul 9, 2006

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    In Rabat's medina

    The medina in Rabat is agreat place to shop. We were able to browse without any hassle from shopkeepers, quite a nice change from Fes and Tangier. Also, the prices were much lower than in other cities. As we were only halfway through our trip we didn't want to buy too much as we'd have to carry it to Marrakech and Essaouira, otherwise we would have bought all our souvenirs here. Rabat has fewer tourists than the other big cities and most of the shoppers in the medina are locals so the prices do tend to be much better.

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    Livre Service Rabat S.A.: Books galore...

    by Bernhadette Updated May 21, 2006

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    The Livre Service bookstore is large and well assorted, with literature in different languages. Whether you want to get to know the contemporary Moroccan literature or need a travel guide, the staff is very friendly and helps with all questions and problems. French paperbacks are quite cheap in Morocco. So you can get for example a paperback-novel of Morocco's famous author Driss Chraibi for 29 Dirham (= ca.3 Euro).

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    Pottery shop: Artisan Village

    by uglyscot Updated Dec 4, 2005

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    A shop selling pottery. There was a large selection of decorated pottery of different designs and shapes.Nearby were the workshops, and the smoke can be seen from some of them.
    An exhibition at the beginning of the village has examples of carpets, metal lanterns, lamps, shoes and garments section but there didn't seem to be anyone to ask about the produce when I was there. Perhaps because it was in the afternoon?

    What to buy: Tradiional crafts like pottery, lamps, shoes , carpets, brasswork and jewellery.

    What to pay: I bought a selection of seven pieces of pottery and paid very little for them. A small covered pot was 15 dirham , a medium sized one 40 dirham, After I had selected everything I paid 100 dirham and got a small piece added on free. Now all this was less than 20$US, and I might have got for less if I knew how to bargain. But at the airport similar goods cost up to ten times the price.

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    Pâtisserie Abtal: Moroccan cakes !

    by JLBG Written Dec 17, 2004

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    Moroccan cakes are very good and "Pâtisserie Abtal" is among the best in Rabat if not the best, that is what my Moroccan friends told me.

    What to buy: They uses a lot of ground almonds and almond paste, various kinds of wheat and honey. They are definitely not for weight watchers!

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