Rabat Things to Do

  • A Near Complete Ruin
    A Near Complete Ruin
    by Mikebb
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    On Duty - Royal Palace Entrance
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Most Recent Things to Do in Rabat

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    Mohamed V Mausoleum

    by solopes Updated Sep 11, 2014

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    All visitors of Rabat go to this place, and some of them limit themselves to it.

    A large terrace, with the remains of a never finished mosque is dominated by Hassan Tower from the 12th century.

    But when you enter, you'll be captivated by the harmony of the modern and very beautiful tomb of the king's grandfather, Mohamed V.

    With permanent prayers and military honors, the entrance to the tomb is allowed, with the expected respect.

    Rabat - Morocco Rabat - Morocco Rabat - Morocco
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    Hassan Tower

    by solopes Updated May 13, 2014

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    In the 12th century sultan Yacoub al-Mansour decided to build the biggest mosque in the world, with the biggest tower.

    He died a few years later and the works were stopped, with the tower reaching 44 of its planned 86 meters high.

    Lisbon's earthquake damaged the started columns and walls, but the tower resisted and stands beside king Mohammed V mausoleum.

    The tower looks like Koutoubia in Marrakesh and Giralda in Seville, both built by the same architect

    Hassan Tower
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    Chellah

    by solopes Updated Dec 18, 2013

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    At a short distance from town, in a facing hill, this necropolis is one of the oldest constructions in Morocco.

    Abandoned for centuries, and heavily damaged by an earthquake in the 18th century, it has been recuperated and gardened, acting today as one of the main touristy attractions of Rabat

    Chellah - Rabat - Morocco
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    Views from Oudaia Kasbah

    by al2401 Updated Apr 24, 2011

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    While visiting the Oudaia Kasbah you must visit the lookout. From this part of the fortress there are spectacular views over the Atlantic Ocean, Bouregreg River, the city of Rabat and its twin city of Sale.

    Please refer to the page for the Oudaia Kasbah for the history and directions.

    Mouth of Bouregreg River to Atlantic Ocean - Rabat Sale - Rabat Atlantic Ocean - Rabat Hassan Tower, Mausoleum Mohammed V - Rabat Atlantic Ocean - looking west - Rabat
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    Oudaia Kasbah

    by al2401 Written Apr 24, 2011

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    The Oudaia Kasbah is built on the cliff on the south side of the estuary of the Bouregreg River and has views over Rabat and out over the Atlantic Ocean. It could be called a 'city within a city'.

    It was built during the 12th century by the Almohades as part of a fortification - actually a fortified monastery or 'ribat' (which became Rabat) where soldiers left for the holy wars against Spain. An arabic tribe from Fes called the Oudaias settled here in 1833 giving the fort and kasbah their name.

    The village in the kasbah has a more modern history dating from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It has a very Spanish flavour with the whitewashed walls with blue paint and heavy, iron decorated doors. The homes are kept very fresh and the winding streets are very clean. It has become a haven for artists and there are many interesting boutiques to be visited.

    Bab Oudaia - entrance to the kasbah and gardens Oudaia Kasbah Oudaia Kasbah Oudaia Kasbah Oudaia Kasbah
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    Chellah

    by al2401 Updated Apr 24, 2011

    Chellah is an area of ancient and medieval ruins that at one stage was used as a necropolis. It is on the outskirts of Rabat, on the south side of the Bouregreg River. This site is the most ancient human settlement in the area. It was most likely settled by the Phoenicians and the Carthaginians.

    The Romans settled here and called the town Sala Colonia - ruins still exist of a forum, triumphal arch and decumanus maximus (main street)

    Inhabitants left the site in 1154 AD altough the Almohad dynasty used it as a necropolis. The main gate was built in 1339 by Sultan Abu l-Hassan who also added a mosque, a religious school and royal tombs.

    Much of Chellah was damaged by the earthquake in 1755 that destroyed Lisbon and the site is now a garden and a venue for tourism. The ruins, as with many in Morocco, have been turned into nests by migrating Storks. Very busy in May/June when I visited.

    You will be met by traditional musicians with a small stall.

    Chellah Traditional drummer - Chellah Garden walk - Chellah Stork's nest - Chellah Roman ruins - Chellah
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    Hassan Tower

    by Mikebb Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    In 1195 construction commenced on the Minaret with the intention of being the largest in the Muslim world at 286 feet. Two hundred columns were built to markout where the mosque was to be built. However when the Sultan died 5 years later construction ceased with the tower only being 140 feet high.

    The Minaret stands out over the skyline and is a good location guide for tourists.

    As the Minaret is only metres from the Mohammed V Mausoleum it is well worth visiting both sites.

    Hassan Tower Guards @ Hassan Tower Entrance Close Up of Minaret Columns Mark Out Where The Mosque Should Be
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    The mahogany stalactites

    by berenices Written May 7, 2010

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    The inside of the dome of the Mohammed V Mausoleum is very impressive. It is twelve-sided, and filled with painted mahogany muqarnas (stalactites), and is the most intricate part of the mausoleum. The mausoleum was designed by a Vietnamese architect (Vo Tuan), and built by 400 Moroccan craftsmen.

    It's interesting to note how the majesty of these ceilings in all Moroccan monuments (including those in Andalucia) contrast to the simplicity of the sarcophagus, and the area around it. Indeed, if heaven were above and we were made to look in that direction, then this is a most apt representation.

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    Views of the Bou Regreg, Salé, and the Atlantic

    by berenices Written May 7, 2010

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    The platform of the former Oudaia Signal Station is the best place to see views of Salé (Rabat's sister city across the river), Bou Regreg, and the Atlantic ocean. This station was built in the 18th century by Sultan Sidi Mohammed ben Abdallah, which defended the Bou Regreg estuary.

    We were there at the end of the day, and was able to see the sun set -- fantastic! With the lights just coming on across the river, and the soft breeze coming in, it was a nice place to be at after a hot tiring day. The place was full of couples who we were obviously taking advantage of the dimming light (there were no lampposts, or at least we didn't see any lighted), but who cares -- it was quite romantic there, and the locals very well knew that.

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    Changing of the guards

    by berenices Written May 6, 2010

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    We were just passing in front of the entrance to the Mausoleum of Mohammed V one late afternoon when we saw the changing of the guards. We were the first vehicle to be stopped, so it afforded us a front seat view of the routine. The guards looked quite snappy in their uniform of deep red, and blue beret. From a distance, their white and black shoes looked a bit like golf shoes. As they went down the street, they were joined by 2 mounted officers in very fine-looking horses. It all went very quickly as they made a turn right on the corner, and went in.

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    Large Birds' Nests - No Birds To See

    by Mikebb Updated Feb 15, 2010

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    We saw several large Bird's Nests as we walked around the ruins at Chellah. We never saw any birds in the nests, however when a nest is that large it would be difficult for the chicks to poke their head over the side.

    Birds Nests - Ideal Vantage Point. Bird Nests Standout Against The Skyline
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    The Walls Of Chellah

    by Mikebb Updated Feb 15, 2010

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    These walls have been here for many hundreds of years. We did not have time to enter through the Gate, just enough time to admire and also take a few photos.

    Being on a tour we had to follow our guide who led the track down to the Roman Relics of Chellah.

    The City Walls provide a great view over Chellah.

    Gate & Walls - Chellah Map Of Chellah Stall Outside Chellah Walls
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    Roman Relics Of Chellah

    by Mikebb Updated Feb 15, 2010

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    Located not far from our hotel we enjoyed this visit. Mohomed our Moroccan Guide appointed by the Government to be our official guide during our 7 day visit took control from our Tour Company Guide, an Englishman. It appears when all the tour companys like Globus, Insight, Cosmos, Trafalgar etc enter Morocco a Local guide accompanies the tour 24/7.

    Mohomed spoke good English and had extensive Knowledge of all tourist sites. He loved his job and gave us all the information we required on the Roman Relics Of Chellah. The ruins were extensive.

    Roman Ruins Mohomed In The Hat Explains the Chellah Ruins. View Over The Ruins To The River A Near Complete Ruin
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    The Royal Palace

    by JessieLang Written Jan 15, 2010

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    Tourists can go through the gates to see the outside of the Royal Palace, but we can’t go in.
    There are gardens and a private mosque. Hassan II (the current king’s father) lived here until his death in 1999, but Mohammed VI chooses not to. He still lives in the house he had before he became king.

    The Alaouits began ruling Morocco in 1666, and Mohammed VI is the 27th king in this dynasty. They were originally from Saudi Arabia and Syria.

    Royal Palace the King's Mosque Palace Entrance
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    The Archaeological Museum

    by JessieLang Written Jan 12, 2010

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    The National Archaeological Museum has an excellent collection representing a variety of time periods and cultures, including Phoenician pottery, an Egyptian sphinx, and Roman bronzes.
    Some ivory cups and decorated pottery date from 3800 B.C.

    There is a really nice 2nd or 3rd Century statue of a young Berber, and another of a fisherman with an ownership mark on his chest. Some statues were headless—when there is a change in rulers, it is easier to carve a new head than a whole new statue.

    The Museum was built in 1932.

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