Unique Places in Namibia

  • Rheinische Missionskirche in Walvis Bay
    Rheinische Missionskirche in Walvis Bay
    by globetrott
  • Rheinische Missionskirche in Walvis Bay
    Rheinische Missionskirche in Walvis Bay
    by globetrott
  • Rheinische Missionskirche in Walvis Bay
    Rheinische Missionskirche in Walvis Bay
    by globetrott

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Namibia

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    Keetmanshoop, Re-Supply, Local Interests

    by Waxbag Written Dec 13, 2004

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    There is not much here in this small town that is one of Nambia's largest. There are serveral good food stores and banks where you can get supplies and money. The town is not too far away two South African boarder posts.

    There is also the Kookerboom Forests and Giants play ground just north east of town. Even better is the new Megasaurus camp ground that has even more kookerbooms and 280 million year old fossils of lizard fish that are in excellent condition.

    Keetmanshoop

    Megasaurus Fosils
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    • Camping

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    Luderitz

    by Waxbag Written Dec 13, 2004

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    Even though this is a small town, it is one of the largest population centers in Namibia. It is a popular overland stop between the Fish River Canyon and the Namib-Naukluft National Park. There isn't a whole lot to do here except eat some fish and do a little local break dancing.

    There are some interesting things to do outside of town like the diamond mine at Kolmanskop. The sand sinds and occasional kokerboom tree is intersting as well.

    Luderitz

    Kokerboom tree
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    Flamingo Colony in Walvis Bay

    by Waxbag Updated Dec 13, 2004

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    Flamingo Colony

    If you are near Walvis bay, perhaps on route to Swakopmund, make a quick stop to the harbor in Walvis bay and check out the flamingos that hang out in huge numbers. There really isn't a whole lot to do in this town but see the flamingos.

    Off shore Walvis bay, located just south of Swakopmund.

    Check out my Walvis bay page for more information.
    Walvis Bay

    Flamingo Colony at Walvis Bay
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    • Photography

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    See 280 million year old Fosils at Megasaurus Camp

    by Waxbag Written Dec 7, 2004

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    This camp is a farm owned by a very nice and hospitable africaaner family. They still run the farm and 1.5 hour tours of it where you will get the opportunity to see thousands of kookerbooms and millions of rock piles everywhere. The special part of the tour are the three or four fossils of 280 million year old lizard fish that are just sitting out in the open. They are in excellent condition. You can see the sedimentary layers of rock in which the fossils were once hidden. This whole region used to be a huge lake system when the African and South American continents were pulling apart. Included in the tour is a fossil of a plant that would have been found during the time of the megasaurus.

    The cost is R30 per person.

    Directions:
    North East of Keetmanshoop

    Megasaurus Fosil
    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Camping
    • Desert

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  • tini58de's Profile Photo

    Caprivi

    by tini58de Updated Aug 5, 2004

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    The Caprivi is a narrow but long strip of land in the far northeast of Namibia. Nowadays there is a tarred National Road through most of the 400 km of the Strip, thus making it able to comfortably reach the Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe now!

    Katima Mulilo is the main town of the Caprivi strip and lies at the mighty Zambesi river. It has a nice campground with some lodges directly at the river. Katima has an airport, a hospital, several petrol stations, grocery stores and idyllic street markets with hand-crafted articles. I bought a wonderful basket there, which I still cherish a lot!

    The Caprivi belongs to the tropical climate zone, so a malaria prophylactic is strongly recommended! Do ask your doctor!

    What I liked about this part of Namibia, was the more "African" rather than German feeling there!

    village in Namibia
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    Bull's Party

    by tini58de Updated Aug 5, 2004

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    "Bull' s Party" is a gigantic rock formation not too far away from the Phillip's Cave. It is a popular picnic spot for visitors in this area and a fun place to walk around!

    When we visited, there were no regulations whatsoever, but now I read that an entrance fee is charged, visiting hours are set from 7.30h to 17.00h daily and no open fires are allowed (which makes sense!)
    .

    Bull's Party

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    Philips Cave

    by tini58de Updated Aug 5, 2004

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    The Erongo Mountains near Karibib are known for the rock paintings found at sites such as Phillip's Cave. One of the most fascinating examples of prehistoric art is the "White Elephant". Phillip's Cave can only be reached on foot (about 45 minutes hike).

    The cave is only accessible via the Ameib Ranch - see the website below.
    .

    the White Elephant
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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Archeology

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  • Bushman23's Profile Photo

    See the worlds biggest dune

    by Bushman23 Updated Jun 14, 2004

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    Dune 7 is just outside of Walvis Bay, and although it doesn't seem that large in comparison to the surroundings, when you actually see someone trying to climb it, it is HUGE! Luckily we didn't attempt to climb it, as i don't think we would have made it anywhere near the top.

    If you dont feel too energetic you can sit at the picnic tables while the more insane members of your family climb it...

    Dune 7 from the picnic area
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    Hike the Fish River Canyon

    by Bushman23 Written Jun 10, 2004

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    It is possible to do a 5 day, 85 km hike (rated Medium to Difficult) from the top of the canyon down to Ai-ais. You have to be bloody fit to do this hike though. Myself and a few friends are planning on doing it next year April, and it has potential to be the most amazing hike a person could do.

    Map of the Fish River Hike
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    • National/State Park
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    • Backpacking

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    Sossusvlei Salt Pan

    by Bushman23 Written Jun 10, 2004

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    This area of Namibia is beautiful. Full of sand, but beautiful! We spent an afternoon here, it's quite far out of the way, but definitely worth the trip. You get taken from the entrance gate by 4x4 to the pan (which hadn't had rain for 3 years when we were there). We didn't see much animal life, though how anything could survive in those conditions is beyond me.

    Dont try taking your car into the pan, the sand is so soft you will get stuck almost immediately. Their big-arse 4x4's almost got stuck on our way through!

    The travellers at Sossusvlei
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  • GillianMcLaughlin's Profile Photo

    Makalani palm

    by GillianMcLaughlin Written Jun 6, 2004

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    The makalani palm breaks up an otherwise treeless landscape in the northern part of Namibia. I have searched for some information on these trees, and have found very little. However, thanks to the internet I have gleaned a bit of background.

    The makalani grows quite tall, up to 20 metres high. Aside from looking beautiful with a blue sky behind and when the sun hits their leaves, the makalani is used by locals. Their leaves are cut into threads and used to weave baskets that can be found for sale around Namibia. They are also the source of two alcohols. Palm wine is made from the terminal bud, but, as this kills the tree it is against the law. This law is apparently flouted however. Less devastating to the plant is the distillation of a local brandz, ombike, which is made from fermenting the fruit of the makalani. The seeds are often carved and sold as decorations and are also used as fuel for fires in this country where wood is at a premium.

    Makalani palm tree
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    • Eco-Tourism

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    Namib Desert

    by windsorgirl Updated Apr 9, 2004

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    The scenery in this desert is anything but stark and desolate. The colours of the rock and the linear oases make for an interesting landscape and stunning sunsets.

    The Namib desert stretches along the west coast of Namibia. This photo was taken south of Swakopmund.

    Namib desert
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    Palmwag

    by windsorgirl Updated Apr 9, 2004

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    This was an interesting stop on our way to Etosha National Park. Palmwag is desert oasis and has stunning views of the surrounding landscape. It is also the place to spot the elusive desert elephants. We didn't see any though.

    Palmwag is located in Damaraland in northern Namibia. It is very close to Twyfelfontein, the site of the ancient rock carvings.

    Palmwag, Namibia
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  • GillianMcLaughlin's Profile Photo

    Amazing plantlife # 2 - Baobab trees

    by GillianMcLaughlin Written Apr 3, 2004

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    Ever since I read “The Little Prince” as a child I’d wanted to see a baobab tree. I hadn’t realised they grew in Namibia, but was delighted to discover when I asked the question, that indeed they did, and they do still. I admit that I was amazed that they could. The little I knew of the tree was that it could grow to enormous proportions, and from what I’d seen of the Namibian terrain, it seemed impossible to imagine it could support anything as large as a baobab.

    As you can see from the photo, the trunk was enormous ( I can assure you that my friend Guy is no midget!). I learned also that the tree serves many useful puroses: apart from the shade it provides, the white pulp inside the pods is sustains life around, and is also used by humans in the form of “cream of tartar” (a raising agent in cooking and an essential ingredient in a good scone and also in sherbet, puff candy etc). In some countries the bark is used to make rope also.

    We found this baobab in the north, on the road that leads to the Ongongo waterfall.

    Some say that the baobab is Namibia’s oldest inhabitant! For more information see the website below.

    Baobab tree: Namibia's oldest resident?
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  • GillianMcLaughlin's Profile Photo

    Amazing plantlife #1 Welwitschia Mirabilis

    by GillianMcLaughlin Written Apr 3, 2004

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    I know, I know… that photo does not look like a pile of anything very interesting, but hold off your judgement till you hear a bit more.

    It is a plant called the Welwischia and survives in one of the world’s harshest environments, drawing moisture from costal fogs and from deep down in the ground. It may not be pretty, but it is a true miracle of nature. Unlikely as it may seem, it is named after an Austrian theatre critic who fled the country at some point to Angola!

    Although this plant has only been known to the outside world for less than 150 years, the oldest living specimens are estimated to be between 1500 and 2000 years old. Its characteristics make for some startling reading: the roots can grow to 30m deep. The leaves grow at a rate of 13.8 square metres per year annually. A large plant can grow to 1.5 metres from soil to top of stem, and can extend to a circumference of 8.7 metres… and all of this surviving in temperatures of over 65 Celsius.

    This plant enjoys national protection and the area where it flourishes has been incorporated into the Namib Naukluft park.It is illegal to harm these plants, or to take any part of them out of the country. Few specimens have been successfully cultivated abroad.

    A circuit has been developed across the Namib desert which enables visitors to see these plants up close and personal. I didn't follow the circuit, but the link below will give you as much info as you can handle on the Welwischia Mirabilis and the other rare species of plant that survive desert conditions.

    Welwischia Mirabilis in the Namib desert
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    • Desert
    • National/State Park

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Namibia Off The Beaten Path

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