Local traditions and culture in Nigeria

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Most Viewed Local Customs in Nigeria

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    Traditional believes and deities

    by Toyin Updated Jan 26, 2005

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    The locals believes in deities, and they do perform rights and consultations with the dead. As I mentioned in the other chapter, this is Aro that the people of Ilaro reverred so much..he is believed to have dissadpeared into the ground on the spot this statue lie.

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    Divers Religion

    by Toyin Updated Jan 20, 2005

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    This is another view of the Camelite from the town road. This picture shows, the exclusive nature of this complex from the general population. There is calm and tranquility here, which supports the need for meditations on the part of the inhabitants of Camelite, as it is foundly called by the people of this town.

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    Exchange greetings with people you meet

    by Toyin Updated Oct 3, 2004

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    In Nigeria, it is customary to greet people you dont even know... it get you around quickly. This is contrary to the Western culture, especially in Paris where am presently based. When you greet an elderly person, he/she wonders why you should greet; afterall, you don't know each other.

    It is customary to greet people you come in close contact with in Nigeria.

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    The traditional sector

    by Toyin Updated Oct 3, 2004

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    The traditional settings here shows a typical way of food processing. Here they were making the local food called Gari. This food is very popular throughout the country... made from Cassava, it could be called the staple food of Nigeria.

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    Chritianity

    by Toyin Written Oct 3, 2004

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    Nigeria is taunted to be the most Religious Nation in the world... there are probably equality in numbers of chritians and muslims. However, Western statistics still give a little edge to the muslim population.
    In Nigeria, religion and politics are synonimous.

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    • Religious Travel

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    Mr Bigs, not Macdonalds

    by Toyin Written Oct 3, 2004

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    In Nigeria, there is no Macdonalds, but Mr Bigs. The people came up with a close substitute to Macdonals, as they won't come here because of the negative media coverage of this country.. there are several others where you can have good snacks at reasonable prices.

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    Local Housing

    by Toyin Written Oct 3, 2004

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    The traditional houses are very simple and cool. This is because of high temperatures in the tropics. This story building does not represent the norms, rather, it is a sign that the owner is one of the wealthiest in this village somewhere in YEWA SOUTH of Ogun State.

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    Everything on the head.

    by sachara Written Apr 16, 2004

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    Especially the women in Nigeria, as in most other African countries, carry everything on their head, even rather heavy loads.
    Young girls start allready with this habit. It can surprise you, how they can keep everything in balance.
    Along the road we saw often young female streetvendors with pans, plates and buckets on their head, filled with water and all kind of snacks.

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    Rubbish, what to do with it ?

    by sachara Written Apr 16, 2004

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    In Nigeria, as in most African countries, rubbish-disposal or collecting is not usual. Nor by the local government or otherwise looked it had a high priority.
    So you can find rubbish just everywhere.
    Like in Suleja, a small town just west of Abuja, the river in the centre is totally filled with rubbish.

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    Always greet any eldely one you come across.

    by nnapr Written Oct 15, 2003

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    A ceremony for the goddess Oodua (not to be confused with Oduduwa.

    Nigerians are good at greetings. It is an offence to see an elderly person and pass him/her by without greeting. So it is adviceable to greet people. When you greet people you will have many friends.

    MODE OF GREETINGS: The Yoruba people greet their elders by prostrating. They usually say E ka bo(meaning welcome), the Hausas by genuflecting and sometimes prostrating. They usually say SANU (meaning welcome), the Igbos don't have a special gesture when greeting. They usually say NNO (meaning welcome).

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    Nigerians are good at...

    by paulo007 Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Nigerians are good at greetings. It is an offence to see an elderly person and pass him/her by without greeting. So it is adviceable to greet people. When you greet people you will have many friends.

    MODE OF GREETINGS: The Yoruba people greet their elders by prostrating. They usually say E ka bo(meaning welcome), the Hausas by genuflecting and sometimes prostrating. They usually say SANU (meaning welcome), the Igbos don't have a special gesture when greeting. They usually say NNO (meaning welcome). The Igbos most often use the English form of greetings - the good morning, good afternoon and good evening stuff.

    Tipping in restaurants is not common in Nigeria. In fact, where it is found, it was introduced by visitors.

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  • Everybody is friendly, but if...

    by tomaatje Written Aug 26, 2002

    Everybody is friendly, but if you are a foreigner they ask often if you brought something for them , they realy look up to everything that is from abroad.
    Also don't be scared by the poverty because you will see a lot of poor and handicapt people on the street trying to get some money.

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    Tipping is not common in...

    by Paul-linus Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Tipping is not common in Nigeria, though it is done. But I must tell you that tipping was introduced by foerigners. However, if you wish to tipp fine.

    Nigerians value greetings. So please try and greet people especially the elders. Failure to greet, you will be regarded as a disrepectful fellow. If you greet people you will never miss your road (that is an adage in our culture).

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    The Oba Palace is opened...

    by TanjaE Written Aug 25, 2002

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    The Oba Palace is opened throughout the whole year for visitors. You may ask for a guided tour. They'll give you an appointment, which is worth to be taken (don't frget the TIP). You can visit the ancient Library of the Palace, and the history of the Benin Empire will be explained to you. Here you can get some new tips, on which villages in the sorrounding area you should visit (e.g. Udo)

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    Some local travel agencies...

    by antelop Updated Aug 25, 2002

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    Some local travel agencies organises some trips to go to see mascarades and special events as the Durbar in Kano (horses show for the Emir) for instance. You can also visit some cultural places as Abeokuta (textile fabrices) and Osogbo (sculptures)..

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