Johannesburg Transportation

  • Transportation
    by Gypsystravels
  • Transportation
    by Gypsystravels
  • Transportation
    by Gypsystravels

Most Recent Transportation in Johannesburg

  • Paulm1987's Profile Photo

    Fast mode of Transport

    by Paulm1987 Written Feb 20, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    modern rail service

    When you ARE at Johannesburg Intl (OR Tambo), there is a Modern rapid Rail Service called Gautrain which connects you to Major Cities like Johannesburg,Sandton and Pretoria. If you don't rent a car It's advisable to use Gautrain since it's quicker and comfortable and it will save you money. Meter taxi's are much expensive.

    All you need to do when you arrive at the Airport is Buy a Gautrain electronic card which is loaded with any amount of money you want then Off you go!

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    • Trains
    • Budget Travel

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  • Paulm1987's Profile Photo

    Rapid Transport System

    by Paulm1987 Written Feb 7, 2014
    Ellis Park Station (BRT)

    There is Rapid Bus Service in Johannesburg called (Reya vaya) meaning "We are on the move" and you make use of, It's convenient in my opinion. Just check out the website for more info...www.reavaya.org.za

    If you want to familiarise yourself with the City, I will recommend a Bus tour around the city which passes through other attractions in the City as well as other sites in the township.visit http://www.citysightseeing.co.za/joburg.php

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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  • Gypsystravels's Profile Photo

    Driving to Kruger

    by Gypsystravels Written Feb 5, 2014

    Included in the price of my safari tour to Kruger was the transporation pick-up from any location in Johannesburg. I was the first pick-up (long, long day for me) at my hotel at about 8:00 am and then subsequently stops to pick up the other passengers.

    The drive to our hotel in Kruger was over a 5+ hour drive in an air-conditioned mini-van making a few rest stops and a stop for lunch.

    The drive to Kruger from Jo'burg is long and tiring, but the scenery can quite make up for that. We drove for a few hours along amazing landscapes before arriving at a designated lunch location. We were asked in advance of our lunch choice (picked from a menu) and the order was placed by the driver before arriving. Price for lunch is not included.

    The mini-van accommodates up to 12 passengers. The seats were comfortable enough, but I get quite restless and after a few hours I dying to arrive.

    I did use time to catch up on some writing, viewing photos and napping :)

    The roads are excellent and whether you decide to make your own way or have some one drive you there shouldn't be any concerns regarding safety. For those that drive on the left side, note that driving in South Africa is done on the right side.

    Related to:
    • Safari
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip

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  • Gypsystravels's Profile Photo

    British Airways to Johannesburg

    by Gypsystravels Updated Feb 5, 2014
    The big bird :)
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    As a Million Mile Member currently holding mid-tier status, American Airlines will always be my choice of airline, but since AA does not fly to South Africa flying on their OneWorld partner British Airways allows me to accrue miles and re-qualify for my status.

    My trip started in NYC with my flight on AA to London where I had a long layover before my flight on British Airways to Johannesburg. The flight from London to Jo'burg is a little over 10 hours. British Air has a few flights nightly that get you into Jo'burg in the morning, which allows you to make the best of the day.

    Our flight was on an old 747(4) with no Economy Extra (more leg room), so getting a bulk head seat was the best bet for getting a little more room and some rest. The flight was quite pleasant, and oddly enough went by quickly. Meals are served (dinner, breakfast) and there is entertainment available.

    I usually catch up on some reading, writing or just listen to some music before trying to get a few hours sleep.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Road Trip
    • Safari

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  • Gypsystravels's Profile Photo

    Gautrain to Sandton

    by Gypsystravels Updated Feb 5, 2014
    Arriving train
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    The Gautrain is an excellent, efficient, inexpensive way of getting from OR Tambo to Sandton. There were 8 of us, and we could have easily split two cabs for the price we each paid for the train, but we weren't in much of a rush and it was conveniently located within the airport, so no need to step outside.

    The trains are new, modern and remind me of the trains in Italy with space designated specifically for luggage and bags. OR Tambo is the first stop of the line on your way to Sandton. The ride is little over 25 minutes at a cost of R12. There are machines to purchase your fares with either cash or credit cards.

    Our ride to and from OR Tambo was a pleasant short ride and I would recommend the Gautrain to anyone that is staying within walking distance from any of the stations. My hotel, the Radisson Blu was literally diagnolly across from the Santon Gautrain station.

    Check out their website for up to minute information, prices and options on using the Gautrain.

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    • Trains

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  • kenHuocj's Profile Photo

    Bus or Taxi

    by kenHuocj Written Oct 6, 2013

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    from childhood days - vir Blankes Aleen
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    times have changed, my last trip to Joeys was a borrowed old beaten up VW Passat, but cheaper than rental and it worked as it was economical.
    a week ago , i sent a cartoon to the family reminiscing about Joeys by a diasporian Cartoonist now living in USofA.
    When spending a few days with Grandma during the school holidays, Uncles would take to the Bioscope always by bus, sitting upstairs. I Pretoria, our ethnicity ensured that we were verboten form riding public transport of the Ruling race ( or hue)
    There were trams too, or getting to other transit area or roads especially from Soweto and the other (Black) townships, it was the Green or Mustardy PUTCO buses

    The signs of Blankes allen or nie Blankes evokes mixed emotions, should the past be brought up as reminders or past ills or swept away under the carpet??

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  • cleocat's Profile Photo

    Taxi Service

    by cleocat Updated Aug 12, 2013
    Taxi

    Public transport is not always that easy to come by. In central Johannesburg you might get around with buses, but anything further out will be a problem. Trains are not deemed safe anymore. If you are not planning to hire a car, a taxi service might be your best solution.

    Many taxi services also offer other services such as airport transfer, shuttle services and Au pair taxis. Au pair taxis give parents peace of mind when they can't get their children to school, events and other social engagements.

    Going out for a night on the town will allow you to enjoy yourself, without stressing on how to get home after a great party. A taxi will take you straight to your hotel or home.

    It might not be the cheapest option but with the favourable Rand/ Dollar/ Pound exchange, tourists find it an easy and affordable way to move around without having to stress about driving in a foreign country or rely on unreliable public transport.

    Related to:
    • Work Abroad
    • Budget Travel
    • Business Travel

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  • GracesTrips's Profile Photo

    Car Rental

    by GracesTrips Updated Oct 17, 2012
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    We reserved a car through Avis in advance. However, the car we chose was not available. Don't you hate when that happens. So, it took some time to choose an available car that would fit 3 persons and all our luggage.

    There is quite a selection of car rental companies at the airport. That is helpful.

    Things to consider when driving in South Africa. The steering wheel is on the right side of the car and you drive on the left side of the road. Very confusing if you are not used to that!

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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  • CatherineReichardt's Profile Photo

    Final phase of Gautrain opened today!

    by CatherineReichardt Updated Jun 6, 2012

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    The final section of the Gautrain rapid rail network between Rosebank - to date the southernmost extent of the line - and Park Station opened today (7 June 2012).

    Park Station is located in Braamfontein, just north of the Johannesburg CBD - as shown by the photo above, taken from the top of the Carlton Centre.

    The final phase of Gautrain provides a link to the Metrorail services (probably not of much interest to tourists), as well as to those wanting to catch the Blue Train and Shosholoza Meyl train services to Cape Town. Budget travellers will also welcome this development which allows for easy connection from O.R. Tambo to the long distance bus operators who use the Rotunda bus terminus adjacent to Park Station.

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  • CatherineReichardt's Profile Photo

    Connect to the bus system at Gandhi Square

    by CatherineReichardt Updated May 6, 2012

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    Gandhi Square (seen here from the top of the Carlton Centre) is the terminus of Johannesburg's Metrobus system and was formerly known as Van der Bijl Square.

    Gandhi Square is located adjacent to Eloff Street, which used to be Jo'burg's premier shopping street, but has since been eclipsed by the rise of suburban shopping malls and pernicious inner city decay. The bus terminus fell into a state of disrepair in the 1990s but as revamped around the turn of the millenium as part of a programme of inner city renewal and renamed to commemorate Mohandas Gandhi, who spent twenty years of his adult life living and working in South Africa.

    Follow the link below for the bus timetable - a staggering 111 pages of it - which sadly implies that the bus system with much greater coverage than it actually offers!

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  • CatherineReichardt's Profile Photo

    The long awaited Rea Vaya bus system

    by CatherineReichardt Updated May 1, 2012

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    In recent years, Johannesburg's Achilles Heel has been the almost complete absence of a decent public transport system - irking for local commuters and a particular problem for visitors who are unwilling or unable to hire a car to get around.

    Way back in the mists of time, there was a tram and bus system which served the inner suburbs, but as the city expanded into sprawling suburbia (for whites) and vast townships on the edge of the city (for everyone else), scant regard was given to expanding these transport systems, and the assumption was that people would rely on cars. This lack of planning has come back to haunt us, with increasingly congested roads (and a carbon footprint to match) and in the post-apartheid era, priority has finally shifted towards the development of a long overdue public transport system.

    'Rea Vaya' means 'we are moving' in Sotho, and is a multiphased programme to develop a bus rapid transit system serving Johannesburg and the neighbouring southern townships (including Soweto and Thokoza). However, the scheme has been controversial, as Rea Vaya directly competes with the minibus taxis which are the most common form of transport for people commuting in from the townships, and the taxiowner associations have been vehement in ther opposition to its implementation. After a series of violent clashes, a landmark deal was brokered whereby the taxi associations would become shareholders in Rea Vaya.

    So far Phase 1A of the Rea Vaya rapid bus transit system has been completed. This comprises a trunk route between Ellis Park in Doornfontein (just east of the CBD) and Thokoza Park in Soweto, linking with several feeder routes in Soweto.

    The excellent map on the weblink below outlines the routes of Phase 1A (already implemented) and 1B, and indicate the location of tourists attractions with relation to the routes.

    Work is underway on Phase 1B to develop an inner city loop which is likely to be very convenient for tourists visiting Newtown and Braamfontein (including Constitution Hill and the Women's Prison). Construction of the Phase 1B infrastructure (stations/stops and dedicated bus lanes) is underway, but it is difficult to determine exact dates for the commissioning of Phase 1B. Press statements from the City of Johannesburg are fairly vague, and make reference only to 2012, but as these also mention that the vehicle fleet has yet to be procured, I would expect it to be later in the year.

    Rea Vaya currently works on a paper ticketing system and it is not possible to pay the driver. One way travel on 'trunk routes (the longer journeys) ├žost R6 at the time of writing (May 2011) and require a red ticket, whereas travel on the inner city circular route will cost R3.50 and will require a green ticket. Tickets can be purchased at Rea Vaya stations and various shops close to bus stops. There is mention of implementing a 'smart card' system similar to Gautrain, but there is no clarity on the date that this will be implemented.

    Travellers should also be aware of the feeder bus system for Gautrain, which services certain areas not on the Rea Vaya network, and one would hope that planning has ensured that the two systems are complementary.

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  • CatherineReichardt's Profile Photo

    Bugger! Toll roads to hit Gauteng

    by CatherineReichardt Updated May 1, 2012

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    To date, we have managed to avoid toll roads in Gauteng province, but this gantry lurking on the Ben Schoeman highway between Pretoria and Johannesburg is the shape of things to come.

    For the last five years, we have been subject to seemingly endless roadworks on many of the major highways in the province. Although assured that they were not World Cup-related projects (and thus not subject to the mid 2010 time line), nobody thought to question how these extensive upgrades would be financed, or at least in a public forum. Until early 2012, when the programme was reaching completion and it suddenly became apparent that the cost would not be recovered from the substantial levies imposed on the fuel price, but on a 'user pays' basis. And the proposed tolls (which we due to come into effect at the end of April 2012) are so hefty that they have triggered universal outrage from motorists, civil society, business organisations, the trade unions and all opposition political parties, which makes for a heady alliance of unlikely bedfellows.

    Which is all rather odd, given that the project would have been subject to environmental impact assessment, of which socio-economic impact assessment should be a mandantory component. Literally hundreds of thousands of people use these highways every day to commute to and from work - but the impact of a initially proposed toll of 66c/km was not taken into account??? Given the direct cost to commuters, plus the 'knock on' effects to the economy in terms of increased transport costs, this is unbelievable ... but then this is South Africa, where government works within world class legislation, but on the principle of 'do as I say, not as I do'.

    So, what does this mean to the tourist? Well, the certainty is that tolling will not come in at the end of April 2012, as originally proposed. When it does, it will be added to your hire car charges at a level as yet unspecified: the current tariff on the table is 30c/km for those registered for e-tolling (rather a climb down from the original 66c/km), but anything up to R1.75/km for users who are not registered for e-tolling. Watch this space for updates as and when they become available ...

    And, lest I be accused of being bitter and twisted about this, let me add that I am one of the lucky few who seldom if ever has to venture on the highways, and is thus largely absolved from paying tolls ...

    Update (25 April 2012): A court has ruled today that the urgent case brought by a coalition opposed to tolling on Gauteng's highways must be heard before e-tolling is introduced, and the outcome is due to be announced on 28 April 2012.

    Update (28 April 2012): A ruling has been handed down, suspending tolling until the matter has been given further consideration, which is likely to take a number of months whilst both sides prepare and argue their respective cases. As a result, tolling (which was due to come into force on 1 May 2012) will be postponed until further notice.

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  • CatherineReichardt's Profile Photo

    Complete Gautrain service starts 2 August 2011!

    by CatherineReichardt Updated Apr 25, 2012

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    The sign says it all!

    Yippee!!! Gautrain have announced that the whole system (with the single exception of Park Station in the Jo'burg CBD) will be commissioned on Tuesday 2 August 2011. This makes the journey between OR Tambo airport and Pretoria very straightforward and less than an hour: you just need to change platforms at Marlboro (which doesn't require a change of platform) or Sandton (which does).

    This route is also useful for those travelling between Jo'burg's two major business/shopping/ entertainment hubs in Sandton and Rosebank - this is a straight route and doesn't require any transfers.

    As with the rest of the Gautrain system, services will run approximately every 12 minutes between 05:30 and 20:30.

    Follow this link for an indication of travel times and fares.

    Halleluia - good things really do come to those that wait!

    Update (April 2012): Trials are currently being conducted on the stretch between Rosebank and Park Station, and indications are that this final section of the Gautrain network will be commissioned some time in May 2012, provided that the outstanding authorisations can be secured.

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    Update on opening of complete Gautrain network

    by CatherineReichardt Updated Apr 25, 2012

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    Gautrain

    In April 2011, the provincial authorities confirmed that opening of the complete Gautrain high speed rail network is still on track (sorry, couldn't resist that!) and will open on 1 July 2011. For a map of the complete network, follow the link below.

    In essence, the network has two components: a west-east link from Sandton to O R Tambo International airport (aimed at tourists and those travelling to the airport) and a north-south link from Hatfield in northern Pretoria to Park Station in Central Johannesburg. Anyone travelling from Hatfield, Pretoria, Centurion or Midrand in the north, or Rosebank and Park Station in the south needs to change at either Sandton or Marlboro to transfer to the airport: Marlboro is probably the better option if you have heavy bags or limited mobility, as you can stay on the same platform, whereas at Sandton, you will need to change platform, which involves going up/down a short escalator (and the station is also busier).

    Stations most likely to be of relevance/interest to tourists are Sandton and Rosebank, which are close to hotels most often used by tourists, and also adjacent to major upmarket shopping malls. These two areas (particularly Sandton) also have the greatest concentration of businesses/offices in Johannesburg, so if you're visiting on business, this is most likely where you'll need to get to. There is a very reasonably priced Gautrain bus service which links Sandton station with parts of Sandton and Rosebank. Follow this link for more details.

    Those wanting to get to the Johannesburg CBD should use Park Station, which will bring you close to tourist attractions such as Constitution Hill/the Women's Prison, the Newtown Precinct (including World of Beer, The Worker's Museum, MuseumAfrica and Sci Bono), the Johannesburg Zoo/Zoo Lake and the Oriental Plaza. It is also the closest station to the Apartheid Museum and Gold Reef City, although this is still quite a trek. Most of these (with the exception of the Apartheid Museum and Gold Reef City) are walkable. Having said that, I wouldn't recommend that first time visitors do this, although if you're a local (or a savvy backpacker) it might not faze you. Alternatively, you should catch a taxi cab.

    The most relevant station for tourists on the Pretoria area is likely to be Pretoria Central. This is on the southern limit of the Pretoria CBD, with attractions such as Church Square, Pretoria Zoo, the Transvaal Museum and the Union Buildings. It is also fairly close to the Voortrekker Monument and Freedom Park. Again, I would not recommend that first time tourists walk to these attractions, so your only real option is to catch a taxi cab (in which case, the same advice applies).

    I confess that I am not too excited about advising that tourists take taxi cabs in South Africa, as too often they are unroadworthy, dilapidated and driven by individuals of dubious competence and ethics. My advice would be to look for one in good condition with a meter, and agree the price up front. Hopefully the existing Gautrain bus service will be extended once the whole network is open to make these attractions safely and easily accessible from the stations. Alternatively at least some of the major attractions may see the gap and arrange shuttles from Gautrain stations once they get up and going.

    Update (July 2011): The opening of the complete Gautrain system has been delayed because of problems in getting the necessary paperwork issued by the national rail regulator. It's impossible to get an exact date on which this will happen, but the Bombela consortium (who developed Gautrain) are assuring the public that the entire network should be opened by the end of the month (July 2011). Watch this space for updates ...

    Update (April 2012): Trials are currently being conducted on the stretch between Rosebank and Park Station, and indications are that this final section of the Gautrain network will be commissioned some time in May 2012, provided that the outstanding authorisations can be secured.

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    Gautrain running between Jo'burg and Pretoria!

    by CatherineReichardt Updated Apr 25, 2012

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    Commuters work out the system ...

    Halleluia!

    After years of construction-related grief, the complete Gautrain system (with the exception of the sourthernmost section to Park Station in the Johannesburg CBD) is finally up and running! No problems have been reported in the first day of operation, and it is hugely encouraging to see such huge numbers of people turning out to 'test drive' Our Train, the Gautrain!

    Please see my earlier transport tips for more details on operating hours, costs, routes and associated bus services.

    It has been announced that a bus service will be introduced between Rosebank and Park Station until engineering work has been completed which will allow this final section of the network is commissioned. Note that at the time of writing (3 August 2011), this bus service had not yet been introduced, but indications are that it will commence "within a few weeks". As ever, watch this space ...

    Update (April 2012): Trials are currently being conducted on the stretch between Rosebank and Park Station, and indications are that this final section of the Gautrain network will be commissioned some time in May 2012, provided that the outstanding authorisations can be secured.

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Johannesburg Transportation

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