Kruger National Park Shopping

  • Outside the Park Shop
    Outside the Park Shop
    by vpas
  • "Big Five" shot glass set also available...
    by glabah
  • Shopping
    by Gili_S

Best Rated Shopping in Kruger National Park

  • Braveheart.southafrr's Profile Photo

    all the camps: to shop or not to shop

    by Braveheart.southafrr Written Oct 22, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    there are loads of gift shops at all the main camps through out the park , but the only thing is they are very expensive with everything we bought a red bull and energy drink in the park it cost us R20 , out side the park you can buy one for about R9 even books on the park are dearer in the park than outside .....

    What to buy: anything and everything

    What to pay: twice the actual price out side the park

    Related to:
    • National/State Park

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  • diver-x's Profile Photo

    Rest Camp General Stores: From animal skins to fridge magnets

    by diver-x Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I feel bad for this lion. On sale at Skukuza.

    All of the rest camps that we stayed at had a general store that sold supplies local crafts, skins and souvenirs.

    What to buy: I'd stay away from buying local crafts at Kruger. You can get much better deals on the same exact stuff outside the park. In general, you'd pay at least twice the amount for a craft item inside the park as you would at a roadside market outside the park.

    We bought our daily supplies of snacks for the road and wine at night at the camp shops.

    What to pay: When we were there, the currency conversion was approx R6.70 = $1.00 USD. Here's what you can expect to pay for some miscellaneous items:

    Energy bars: R4.60
    Candy bar: R4.75
    Bag of Trail Mix: R13.50
    Bottle of wine: R41.25
    1.5 litre of water: R4.65
    Coke Light (340ml can): R4.40
    Coke Light (2 liter bottle): R13.50
    Small wedge of cheese snack: R1.80
    Small box of cookies: R11.25
    Cork screw: R15.35
    Souvenir fridge magnets: R30.00 each

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Photography
    • Safari

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  • glabah's Profile Photo

    Not a shop: this is something you buy in Kruger: Excellent book gives unique perspective of Kruger

    by glabah Written Jun 9, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    With one short photo section, book is story packed
    2 more images

    "There are only two great certainties in a game ranger's career. The first is that you will never be well off. The second - and best by far - is that you will do things that most other people will only get to dream about." - Bruce Bryden, from the book A Game Ranger Remembers which is available in the stores in Kruger Natinal Park.

    What to buy: A Game Ranger Remembers is a wonderful rememberance of a South African game ranger who spent some 30 years in the South African national park system - 27 of those years at Kruger. There is occasional strong language, but remember that this life is sometimes quite rough, and occasionally people die. In most cases, the strong language is quite appropriate.

    What to pay: R160.00 - 160 rand - seems to be the going rate at the park stores - at least when I visited in November of 2006.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Photography

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  • Gili_S's Profile Photo

    Rest camps shops.

    by Gili_S Written Sep 6, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In the park rest camps there are nice shops were you can buy supply as well as souvenirs. Whatever your taste is like, they have here magnificent items. Traditional and modern as well. Guidebooks and brochures are available there as well.

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  • Moirads's Profile Photo

    Roberts Bird Guide (A book, not a shop): Kruger National Park and Adjacent Lowveld

    by Moirads Updated Jan 31, 2010

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Roberts Bird Guide

    Austin Roberts published his definitive field guide on 8 June 1940. He died in 1948. That his name is still being attached to bird guides with his numbering system is somewhat remarkable. This latest edition is a further tribute by the South African birding community to his work.

    The Kruger National Park is a popular destination for both local and international tourists and the birds in the Park are a fascinating aspect for everyone interested in more than just the Big Five. This book is an affordable opportunity for novices to get excellent quality information and for experienced birders to put a lightweight and handy guide onto their dashboards.

    The illustrations are brilliant studies in just what distinguishes one bird from another and I had fun actually using it during my recent visit to the Park. I was terribly excited whenever I found a positive identification, but at least got some ideas of what I was seeing when I wasn’t certain.

    The book makes use of the new names of birds, thus a giant eagle owl becomes a Verreaux eagle owl (guess who saw one of these) and dikkops become thick knees. The distribution maps are clear and the ecozones or major habitat types are nicely set out, together with a general map of the Park for those who may need it.

    The glossary, both words and pictures, is clear and sufficiently simple for novices to follow while offering relevant information to more experienced birders.

    The list of birds is published in Portuguese, German, French, Zulu, Xhosa, South Sotho, North Sotho and Afrikaans, increasing its user-friendliness for people whose mother tongue is not English.

    I recommend this book and plan to make it a permanent part of my Kruger Park holiday kit along with my binoculars, water bottle, camera and sun hat.

    Title: Roberts Bird Guide
    Sub-title: Kruger National Park and Adjacent Lowveld
    Authors: Hugh Chittenden and Ian Whyte
    Publishers: Jacana
    Year: 2009
    Recommended Selling Price: R165.00
    ISBN: 978-1-77009-638-7

    What to buy: Title: Roberts Bird Guide
    Sub-title: Kruger National Park and Adjacent Lowveld
    Authors: Hugh Chittenden and Ian Whyte
    Publishers: Jacana
    Year: 2009
    Recommended Selling Price: R165.00
    ISBN: 978-1-77009-638-7

    What to pay: The recommended selling price is R165.00 but shops in the park tend to be a bit more expensive.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Birdwatching

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  • Moirads's Profile Photo

    Game Ranger in Your Backpack (book not shop): Take a game ranger home!

    by Moirads Written Jan 31, 2010

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This book covers the geology, flora and fauna of the Lowveld, but it is much more than simply another field guide to the Kruger National Park and its surrounds.

    The author, Megan Emmett, is both a guide and, from the point of the book, more importantly, an instructor of other guides. Illustrated with photographs by Sean Pattrick, this is a textbook for aspirant field guides. This makes it very useful for everyone. It is also written in a manner which makes it accessible to those who lack formal tertiary education.

    The section on mammals is divided into The Big Five, Common Mammals, Predators and Small Nocturnal Mammals. Each has got statistics of the animal together with some interesting information.

    The section on birds deals with bird song, colour, hygiene, feeding, breeding, nests, and the relationships of birds with one another and to other animals.

    Reptiles and amphibians get their own section, as do insects and other invertebrates. Thereafter the book deals with trees, grasses and wildflowers, ending with a section on tracking and the index and referencing.

    The book is a softcover which opens fully which means it is user friendly. It can be consulted and left open on an empty seat or the dashboard of a vehicle. It is sufficiently informative to be useful but sufficiently compact to be portable. The pages are colour coded which makes finding information even easier once one has mastered the layout of the book.

    If one is only going to take one book out in the vehicle when one heads out of camp, this is strong candidate, especially for keen but less experienced naturalists. It is certainly a useful resource for enthusiasts who wish to know more and is particularly worthwhile for those studying towards lower level accreditation as field guides.

    What to buy: Title: Game Ranger in Your Backpack
    Sub-title: All-in-one interpretive guide to the Lowveld
    Author: Megan Emmett
    Photographer: Sean Pattrick
    Publishers: Briza Publications
    Year: 2009
    Recommended Selling Price: R295.00
    ISBN: 978-1-920217-06-8

    What to pay: R295.00 but the Park Shops are a little more expensive

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Family Travel

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  • kzngirl's Profile Photo

    Camp Shops: Everything but the kitchen sink!

    by kzngirl Updated Aug 26, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are camps spread out throughout the park, and most of them have shops of some kind or another. The majority are medium sized shops that stock a miscellany of items – from souvenirs to food to snacks to toiletries.

    Remember that although the camp shops stock almost everything you would need, the prices are high and I would recommend only using them for grocery shopping if you realise you have left something behind. Don’t plan to do all your shopping when you arrive.

    I also recommend you buy your tourist souvenirs from the locals selling them on the side of the road, as you will pay less for them and the money goes directly into the pocket of the carver/artist.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Photography
    • National/State Park

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  • vpas's Profile Photo

    The Park Shop: What to shop and what not!

    by vpas Written Jun 3, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Outside the Park Shop

    Most camps have a shop that sells grocery and other essentials apart from souvenirs and useful items for camping. If going by car, it is better to buy your groceries and essentials before hand. Everything including mineral water is more expensive inside the park.
    You could buy some Souvenirs since the same may not be available outside. Of course you may need to buy perishables such as vegetables, eggs, yoghurt, fruits etc there so that they are fresh.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • Eco-Tourism

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  • tompt's Profile Photo

    Skukuza: Buy some elephant dung!

    by tompt Written Sep 28, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    elephant dung has just the right size

    What to buy: In Skukuza you can buy boxes made out of elephant dung. Nice to put on your table. Some boxes contain a drink with glas. Other boxes are empty and can be used to store jelewery or something else.

    If this sounds to dirty you can also buy paper made out of elephant dung.

    What to pay: An elephant dung box complete with a small amarula bottle and glas costs about 300 Rand (ca. 30 US Dollar, or 30 Euro)

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  • nichole_521's Profile Photo

    Stores

    by nichole_521 Written Aug 26, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are also stores at the main rest camps that offer food, liquor and gifts. I have heard others say that food at the stores is very expensive, but I did not see a HUGE difference in the prices at KNP than I have at the Pick n¡¦ Pay in Cape Town. Though Skukuza was more expensive than the other rest camps we visited. (Bottled water was 15R instead of 5R!) We did bring along our own food such as fruits, nuts and raisins, bread, peanut butter and crackers! Than again we were on a budget. ƒº

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  • nichole_521's Profile Photo

    Stores

    by nichole_521 Written Aug 26, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are also stores at the main rest camps that offer food, liquor and gifts. I have heard others say that food at the stores is very expensive, but I did not see a HUGE difference in the prices at KNP than I have at the Pick n¡¦ Pay in Cape Town. Though Skukuza was more expensive than the other rest camps we visited. (Bottled water was 15R instead of 5R!) We did bring along our own food such as fruits, nuts and raisins, bread, peanut butter and crackers! Than again we were on a budget. ƒº

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  • Jenniflower's Profile Photo

    Buy local FROM the locals!

    by Jenniflower Updated Jan 17, 2005

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Typical ethnic design on cloth

    There are many lovely retail shops in and around the KNP. They are commercialised though and their mark up is high. It is tourist-priced, not local-priced. Rather buy crafts from the locals themselves who stand at the entrances and exits to the Park if you can.

    They dont have the variety though of course, so buy what you can form them and browse the retails shops within the KNP too for extra gifts you might like.

    What to buy: Handcrafted items like jewellery, baskets, sculptured wooden animals, linens, candles, clothing etc. There are many, and of excellent quality.

    What to pay: I would have about a R100 budget for gift shopping per day... at least!

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Photography
    • Safari

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  • Camp shops: Food & Drink

    by Grootpiet Updated Jul 7, 2005

    Camp shops vary in size and products they carry, but most have a good selection of groceries, braai meats and beer/wine. Try to get your stuff before you enter the park though, as the prices are not surprisingly quite inflated.

    There's also quite a large souvenir section in each, with most of the T-shirts etc. available for a lot less outside the park.

    What to buy: The meats are generally good quality, and they also stock some game cuts worth trying.

    What to pay: Pretty expensive

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  • Gili_S's Profile Photo

    Park map

    by Gili_S Written Sep 6, 2008

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When you get to the park at the gates or rest camps you should buy this excellent park map and guide, it has all the basic information that you need including wild life images.

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  • johanl's Profile Photo

    No Shopping

    by johanl Written Nov 17, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Komatipoort campsite

    Kruger is not a place to shop. As said before things are expensive. Buy your stuff, like food, outside the park

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