other wildlife, Kruger National Park

51 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • other wildlife
    by Gypsystravels
  • other wildlife
    by Gypsystravels
  • other wildlife
    by Gypsystravels
  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    Game - Feeding

    by MikeAtSea Written Feb 17, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hyenas feeding off a giraffe

    Arriving in the Kruger Park is not coming to a zoo. Here game is hunting and others are hunted. Accidents also happen - this was fatal for the giraffe that slipped in a river bed and then was attacked by other game. Lions, leopards and also hyenas fed of her over several days.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Eco-Tourism
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    Game - Zebra

    by MikeAtSea Written Feb 17, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Zebras

    Zebras are most of the time found in large herds. Young Zebras have a challenge just after they are born. They have to learn the pattern of the mother - since all Zebra's patterns are different. A lot of times Zebras are found in the vicinity of gnus - since the warning systems against predators are shared.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Photography
    • Eco-Tourism

    Was this review helpful?

  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    Game - Kudu

    by MikeAtSea Written Feb 17, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Kudu

    This beautiful antelope is found in dense bushes or thick vegetation. The male’s horns are quiet striking. Kudus normally are together in groups of two or three males with some females being close by.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Eco-Tourism
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    Game - Hippo

    by MikeAtSea Written Feb 17, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hippo

    The most dangerous animal in Africa is the hippo. Since most of the life is around water the hippo is the animal that is responsible for most casualties in Africa.
    During the day time they are normally in water as sun protection, during the evening and night they come out to graze.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Photography
    • Eco-Tourism

    Was this review helpful?

  • Waxbag's Profile Photo

    Crocs in the Kruger National Park

    by Waxbag Written Dec 7, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Crocs at Cook's Corner

    There are an estimated 5000 Nile crocodiles in the Kruger National Park. Some good places to find them in the Kruger is Sunset Dam near Lower Sabie Rest Camp, Nsemani Dam west of Satara Rest Camp, and Crook’s corner and all along the Luvuvhu River in the far north. They can be usually seen hanging around hippos.

    Crocs spend their early years feeding on insects and amphibians in sheltered coves. They reach maturity around age 12 and reach 7 feet (2 m) and predominately eat fish and smaller antelope. Adult crocs can live up to 80 years and can grow up to 20 feet (6 m). Adult crocs can weigh up to 2,200 lbs (1,000 kg). Usually crocs are seen sitting on the shore sunning themselves. It has to be a site to see a large croc ambush a zebra or a wildebeest.

    One of the more interesting behaviours with crocodiles are the hard work the mother does in digging a hole with her hind legs and burring 20 to 80 eggs covering them with sand and other vegetation to incubate the eggs at the proper temperature. The mothers have an incredible sense as to what temperature to keep the nest as too hot make too many males and too cold makes too many females. Most nests are 50/50 male/female. When the mother hears peeping sounds she opens the nest. The small crocs can communicate while in the egg and when one starts to peep and break the egg the others shortly follow. The mother will then gather up the baby crocs in her mouth and wash them in the river. The baby crocs will stay with the mother for several months in a sheltered cove as the babies are extremely vulnerable. The Nile monitor lizard is a constant threat to the eggs and to the small crocs and are responsible for 50% of casualties.

    Crocs are incredibly well camouflaged and are extremely dangerous around the river’s edge. They are also fast runners on land over short distances. Never walk close to the water’s edge. Just because you can’t see them doesn’t mean they are not there.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Waxbag's Profile Photo

    Hippos in Kruger

    by Waxbag Updated Dec 3, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hippos at Crook's Corner

    There is an estimated 3000 hippos in Kruger. There are several good spots to see hippo in Kruger. The best spot is Sunset Dam near Lower Sabie rest camp because there is a large herd there and you can get close to water to view them. They hang out right with the large crocodiles. One big happy family! Another good spot to see hippos is at the Nhlanganzwane Dam on the S107 off of S28 south of Lower Sabie restcamp. Orpen Dam near Tshokwane picnic site between Lower Sabie and Satara is also good. I would also recomend Nsemani Dam west of Satara as another excellent place to spot hippo. Lastly Crook's corner in the most north east part of the park has hippo which is right at the mouth of the Luhvuhvu river. You will also find a lot of crocs here too.

    Hippos are the heaviest land mammal in world behind the elephant. It is also the most dangerous animal to humans causing more deaths each year, with exception to the mosquito. Hippos have enormous heads with long lower canines that can grow up to 18” (45 cm) long. They also have a pair of lower incisors that grow up to 10” (25 cm) long. An adult male can weigh up to 7000 lb (3200 kg). Although they are vegetarian they are fiercely territorial, which is what makes them dangerous. The males maintain their female herds by guarding the stretch of water from other males. They scent mark their territory by spraying urine with a propeller like action from their tail.
    Hippos feed mostly at night out of water covering up to 6 miles (10 km) and eating about 40 kg of vegetation. They social and relax in the water during they day giving them a very lazy appearance. Although hippos are enormous they are not fat. They are extremely muscular and thick skins, up to 2 inches (5 cm). They can out run a human out of the water for very short distances.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Giraffe

    by mvtouring Written Oct 11, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Giraffe

    Vital statistics

    Record height 5,88m Average height about 5 m for males, 4,5 for females.
    Weight 1200 males, 825 females
    Duration of life about 28 years.
    There are ...... in the Kruger National Park

    Notes of Interest

    Unmistakeable amongst African wildlife, the giraffe with its long neck is the tallest animal in the world - the sky-scraper of the bushveld.

    Their bodies are covered in irregularly shaped patterns of colour which tends to darken with age. The shape of these patches are used to distinguish the sub-species.

    Calves weigh about 100 kg at birth and stand at 1,5 m. Females can reach a height of 4,3 in 5 years - an incredible rate of growth

    Giraffes have very high blood pressure which is needed to pump blood up that long neck to the brain. At the heart it is 260/160 (compared with 120/80 in humans).

    Giraffes walk in an unusual way, their fore and hind legs on the same side moving together. They run in an ungainly fashion with their necks swinging backwards and forwards in rhythm with their leg movements. They can move at speeds up to 50 km/h, not very fast considering the length of their legs but they can keep this up for several kilometers

    Giraffes are prone to boken limbs through slipping on wet surfaces.

    Mainly silent they can grunt or snort when alarmed but have been heard to bellow when hungry and moo when lonely. They sometimes whistle, growl, cough, scream and even snore.

    They are not water dependent and can go without water for weeks. Drinking at a waterhole is ungainly and dangerous. Before drinking, they first carefully scan the horizon for any predators, and then precariously spread their front legs and stoop down.

    Was this review helpful?

  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Giraffe

    by mvtouring Written Oct 11, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Giraffe

    Vital statistics

    Record height 5,88m Average height about 5 m for males, 4,5 for females.
    Weight 1200 males, 825 females
    Duration of life about 28 years.
    There are ...... in the Kruger National Park

    Notes of Interest

    Unmistakeable amongst African wildlife, the giraffe with its long neck is the tallest animal in the world - the sky-scraper of the bushveld.

    Their bodies are covered in irregularly shaped patterns of colour which tends to darken with age. The shape of these patches are used to distinguish the sub-species.

    Calves weigh about 100 kg at birth and stand at 1,5 m. Females can reach a height of 4,3 in 5 years - an incredible rate of growth

    Giraffes have very high blood pressure which is needed to pump blood up that long neck to the brain. At the heart it is 260/160 (compared with 120/80 in humans).

    Giraffes walk in an unusual way, their fore and hind legs on the same side moving together. They run in an ungainly fashion with their necks swinging backwards and forwards in rhythm with their leg movements. They can move at speeds up to 50 km/h, not very fast considering the length of their legs but they can keep this up for several kilometers

    Giraffes are prone to boken limbs through slipping on wet surfaces.

    Mainly silent they can grunt or snort when alarmed but have been heard to bellow when hungry and moo when lonely. They sometimes whistle, growl, cough, scream and even snore.

    They are not water dependent and can go without water for weeks. Drinking at a waterhole is ungainly and dangerous. Before drinking, they first carefully scan the horizon for any predators, and then precariously spread their front legs and stoop down.

    Was this review helpful?

  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Hippos

    by mvtouring Written Oct 11, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hippo

    Vital statistics

    Weight 1500 kg calf 30/40 kg.
    Shoulder height 1,5 m
    Male length 4 m
    Life expectancy 30/40 years

    Notes of Interest

    They are herbivorous, plucking the grass with the horny edges of their lips and using their huge teeth to masticate the food. The large canines, of 80 cm or more, seem to of survival value.

    The hippo is a selective nocturnal grazer, consuming about 40 kg of grass per night.

    Hippos can be extremely dangerous attacking a human without any obvious provocation. Get between a grazing hippo and water at your peril.

    The hippo skin is up to 50 mm.

    Ironically for an African animal, hippos live in water because they cannot endure very high temperatures. To escape the heat of the day they usually feed at night. During cooler weather they spend time on sandbanks, basking in the sun.

    The hippo swims well and runs underwater at speed, as fast as a man can walk.

    As they are mammals they must surface to breathe but can hold their breath for up to 6 minutes.

    Hippos mate and give birth or in water, the birth process being very fast to enable the calf to get his first breath.

    The hippo is nature's natural dredge. Displacing silt and sand near banks and allowing a continual flow of water.

    Was this review helpful?

  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Baboons

    by mvtouring Written Oct 11, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Baboons

    Vital statistics

    Weight Male 30 kg
    females 18 kg
    Height 1 metre
    Duration of life 12 years

    Notes of Interest

    Baboons are omnivorous and will eat almost anything, fruit, roots, insects (they can remove the sting from the tail of a scorpion) sandwiches and anything else you leave around.
    Baboons possess considerable intelligence and have excellent eyesight and hearing.
    Found in small and large troops, with a well-developed social structure. When danger threatens, the dominant male adopts a hostile stance to protect the agile and swift troop.
    They communicate with loud, deep barks and have a range of conversational utterings, shrieks and screams.
    If disturbed, those on the look-out warn the troop by barking as danger approaches.
    The length of the tail is about that of the head and body.
    Some troops use the same resting place for lengthy periods but others may use different sites at different times and these sites may be used by different troops.
    A single infant is born and there is a close bond between mother and young.
    Their enemies are leopard and man. Thye will jump considerable distances to escape a leopard, making wild cries. They are not so successful in escaping man.

    Was this review helpful?

  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Zebra's - those donkeys wearing pajamas

    by mvtouring Written Oct 11, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Zebra

    Vital statistics

    Weight 325 kg
    Shoulder height 1,3 m
    Duration of life 30 years
    Number in Kruger Park ..............

    Notes of Interest

    No two zebras are alike in the striped pattern of the coat and the two sides of the body are not the same either. Calves recognize their mother by her particular pattern.

    Zebras invariably appear to be thicker necks in prime condition with plump tummies and shining coats. Stallions usually have thicker necks.

    They are grazers and dependent on regular water so will rarely be found more than 10 km from a good water supply.

    Zebras are gregarious and live in small family groups consisting of a stallion, one or more mares and foals. The size of the herd varies with habitat, the more open and comfortable grassland the smaller the herds and than the more dense bush such as the Kruger Park, the larger the herds. This is probably for protection against predators.

    Zebras are timid and shy and frequently found with wildebeest and other species where their superior senses are of benefit to the whole group.

    Zebras have one calf, but mortality rate is high.

    The Burchells zebras mate freely with donkeys - producing a zebdonk. However, they were very timid and prone to stampede and so unpopular with ranchers.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Serval Cat

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Apr 28, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Serval Cat

    We managed to catch a rare glimpse of the reclusive cat during an outing. They are about the size and shape of an american bobcat. Our guide claimed this was the first one he had sighted in 9 years. I apologize for the poor quality photo but it was the best I could get.

    Related to:
    • Safari
    • Photography
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • Bwana_Brown's Profile Photo

    Hippos in the Sabie River

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Feb 8, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Lounging Hippos

    Their camoflage is so good that they are actually difficult to distinguish from the surrounding rocks. Yes, those are partially submerged hippos in the center of the photo. We spotted these ones only an hour and a half after entering Kruger. The next day, on our way to Oliphants Camp, we had a really great look at another bunch of hippos, some of them came out onto land and it is amazing to listen to their grunting as it echoes along the river!!

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Bwana_Brown's Profile Photo

    Giraffe Up Close

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Feb 7, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Giraffe

    Immediately upon entering Kruger at 12:30 PM, we were overwhelmed by the number and species of wild game that presented themselves for viewing! One of the first ones was this Giraffe - it was so close that I had to veer over to the 'wrong' side of the road to get a decent shot (although, in hindsight, it is not all that 'decent'). A summary of what we saw (thanks to the time recorded on our video camera):

    12:44 Impala feeding at the side of the road
    1:26 Giraffe feeding on trees
    1:55 Duikers and Elephants
    1:58 Hippos in a water pool
    2:11 Baboon on the road trying to stop cars
    2:19 Elephant walking down the road - traffic had to go at his pace
    2:27 Zebras at the side of the road, near Sabie River
    2:41 Zebra and Wildebeest grazing and crossing the road
    2:48 Giraffe crossing the road - had to stop

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Photography
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • CharleneP's Profile Photo

    NATIONAL KRUGER PARK

    by CharleneP Updated Sep 7, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Elephants

    The National Kruger Park got alot of Wild animals. Take a map at the gate and drive through the National Park. They've got a wide choice of rest camps with Guest Houses, Bush Lodges, Cottages, Huts and Safari Tents -as well as Caravan and Camping facilities for overnight stays.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Kruger National Park

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

89 travelers online now

Comments

View all Kruger National Park hotels