Safety Tips in Kruger National Park

  • A sign outside Tremisana
    A sign outside Tremisana
    by Gypsystravels
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by nora_south_africa
  • This could confront you if u leave your vehicle
    This could confront you if u leave your...
    by lynnehamman

Most Viewed Warnings and Dangers in Kruger National Park

  • Gypsystravels's Profile Photo

    Extinction is forever

    by Gypsystravels Updated Feb 6, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Poaching has become a HUGE problem here in Africa with the majority of the rhinos and elephants nearing extinction in less then 10 years at the rate they are being slaughtered.

    The black rhino is "critically" endangered while the white rhino is nearing extinction. Rhinos are slaughtered for their horns which are believed by the Chinese to have many medicinal purposes. The horns are prized and can fetch upwards of $1,400 an once. The brutality in how these amazing animals are slaughtered is quite heart breaking. The poachers have become highly sophisticated in their methods with high powered weaponry and quick and lethal saws that cut the horn out of the rhino's face which causes severe blood loss and ultimately death.

    There is some hope, many of the reserves and parks have decided to cut the horns off their rhinos while some have decided to micro chip the horns their rhinos and others have rangers protecting the rhinos 24/7.

    One story that bares sharing is the story of Thandi of Zariega Reserve, the rhino who's horn was hacked off and who has survived and is thriving. Her sheer will to live is a testament that all beings want to live.

    Elephants are equally poached for their tusks and the same ruthless slaughter is brought to them as is to the rhinos. The tusks of elephants are prized again with the Chinese as trinkets of wealth. It is said that if you own an ivory carving in your home you are considered of major wealth and as much of 70 percent or more of the illegal ivory goes to China.

    Elephants are matriarchial animals and comprise of family members ranging from grandmother, mother, daughter, sisters, aunts and siblings living and learning from the many years of experience that the pass along to each other (where to find water, salt licks, etc.) Losing a matriach can be devasting to the whole family.

    In Kenya a well known family matriarch (Qumquat) fell to the invory trade when her and her two oldest daughters were found butchered to death and their faces hacked off by poachers who made sure to get every bit of the tusks. Two of the younger elephants were never found and only the youngest, a 10 month old calf was at his mother's side when the carcasses were found. A tragic and sad story.

    I'm saddened by all the slaughter that happens which is fueled by greed, ignorance of "out dated traditions", war and crime.

    You can help, do not purchase or be part of any product that is derived from elephant tusks or rhino horns.

    *Note: The Western Black Rhino (a subspecies of the black rhino) was declared extinct at the end of 2013 and was last seen in 2006.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

    Was this review helpful?

  • nora_south_africa's Profile Photo

    NO ALCOHOL DAY VISITORS

    by nora_south_africa Written Nov 23, 2011

    Day visitors are no longer allowed to take alcohol into the park, also not allowed to buy from shops within park, you may drink at restaurants. No alcohol allowed in other public places, if you stay in the park take proof of that with when buying alcohol at shops in park.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Safari

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikelisaanna's Profile Photo

    Don't hit the animals crossing the roads

    by mikelisaanna Written Sep 27, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Within its boudaries, Kruger's animals wander freely. One of the consequences of this is that you frequently encounter animals standing in the middle of the road or crossing the road in front of your vehicle. This why it is essential to obey the speed limits within Kruger. We had a close call when an elphant stepped out onto the road in front of us from behind some bushes and trees. We were able to stop in time, but would have hit it had we been speeding. After we recovered from our initial surprise, we did get some great close-up photos!

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Safari

    Was this review helpful?

  • lynnehamman's Profile Photo

    Bush Sense

    by lynnehamman Updated Dec 7, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    DO NOT under any circumstances, leave the vehicle that you are travelling in, while in unprotected areas of the park. Danger lurks around every corner.
    Wear sunscreen, and use insect repellant. If you have an allergy to bees - do not wear perfume or bright colored clothing- these attract bees&b. Its a good idea to use anti-malarial tablets. . Doxycycline is a safe anti-malarial, but use sunscreen- it makes skin more sensitive to sun.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • National/State Park
    • Birdwatching

    Was this review helpful?

  • Acirfa's Profile Photo

    Park Etiquette

    by Acirfa Written Jan 14, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Please remember you are visiting the animals home, respect their need for space, allow them right of way, be careful not to invade their peace and certainly take care not to get between a hippo and the water, an elephant or any animal and it's young and if they wish to cross in front of you then take a wide berth to give them room to do so.

    You are not in a zoo, these animals are wild.

    Refrain from feeding the animals, you may think it's an act of kindness in fact it is quite the opposite, not only does it encourage aggression it also means they do not eat the correct foods to keep them healthy and some foods in fact do harm them.

    Related to:
    • Safari
    • National/State Park
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • DAO's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    ANIMAL BUTTS!

    by DAO Updated Aug 15, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you want to visit Kruger, you need a very expensive camera and loads of film and/or a big memory card. Here is the thing. Animals move! Boy, do they. They are just thinking survival. They often move their rear ends to face you because they then have the ability to run in the exact opposite direction should you pose a threat. They are thinking lions and not being on the carnivore daily specials menu. Only the Elephants slowly walk towards you, and that can be a safety issue too. Do not be ashamed if you have to buy postcards. The big cats like to hide in direct proportion to the amount of money you paid for the holiday AND the cost of your camera multiplied by how new it is.

    Animal butts, get used to it!

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Photography
    • Gay and Lesbian

    Was this review helpful?

  • DAO's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    THIEVING MONKEYS

    by DAO Updated Aug 12, 2006

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Look cute don't they? Distructive thieves are what they are.

    There are several places in the park that allow you to get out of the car to observe things like Hippos in the river. Roll up the windows! This cute mother and son ended up in our car when we were not looking.

    They take things, run away and throw whatever they have stolen everywhere.

    You have been warned!

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • diver-x's Profile Photo

    Booking Ahead: Don't Get Shafted With a Tour Group

    by diver-x Updated Jun 23, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    On one of our night drives, several of our fellow passengers were with a Canadian tour group. Their tour operator charged them $400 Canadian per person for the night drive! The tour only costs R100 per person, or $20 Canadian ($15 USD)! Needless to say, the Canadians were very upset when they found out how much the tour really costs! So if you book ahead with a tour operator, make sure you know how much things really cost.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Photography
    • Safari

    Was this review helpful?

  • kzngirl's Profile Photo

    Fill up with petrol!

    by kzngirl Written Nov 17, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fill up with petrol before you leave your campsite!

    There are petrol stations situated at various campsites throughout the park. It is easy to loose track of how many hours you spend driving around the park each day and I will never forget as a child, being in the park when we ran out of petrol on one trip! Fortunately there was a very helpful game ranger just behind us who was able to help out, but don't get caught! Fill up before you leave the campsite if you are running low.

    When you check in, ask where the petrol stations are located in the park...

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Waxbag's Profile Photo

    Making Advanced Bookings

    by Waxbag Written Dec 11, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is South Africa’s premier park and is now getting a lot more press and attention. It is very popular during school holidays so book ahead during January and February and during the three week holiday in July.

    It may be a good idea to make reservations way in advance if you definately know the dates you wish to visit the park.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Photography
    • Camping

    Was this review helpful?

  • Waxbag's Profile Photo

    Beware at the Numbi Gate

    by Waxbag Written Dec 7, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Apparently security at the Numbi Gate is a problem. I wondered why the park opened the Phabeni Gate so close to the north of the Numbi Gate. My question was answered when a local told me that tourist were being robbed by villagers outside the gate. I was told not go in through this gate and instead go through the Phabeni or Paul Kruger Gate.
    I was told that the Numbi Gate will be closed in the future.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • brancolini's Profile Photo

    Beware of your garbage

    by brancolini Written Sep 1, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    After having our barbecue inside the camp, by our lodge, we were «visited» by a hungry hyena mother, that browsed our garbage for an uncooked beef steak we threw away.
    Although camps are tightly closed and surveilled, she got through and we had quite a scaring trip.
    After talking to camp security, they just laughed and told us that hyenas are strictly necrophagus and don't attack living things (like us), given they are not cornered.

    Related to:
    • Safari
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • MattTB's Profile Photo

    Litter!!

    by MattTB Written Sep 23, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Thankfully there is not much litter in the Kruger National park! PLEASE BE RESPONSIBLE and do not drop any litter during your stay!

    The worst culprates are women.. because there is no easy access to toilets during your safari drive, you must stop your vehicle in a bush area and squat behind the car door! Women often leave bits of tissue on the ground that they used! Please don't! It's not asking much to put the paper into a bag that you can deposit in the bin once you return to camp! Thanks!

    Be aware that our rubbish can cause an extremely painful death to an animal curious enough to eat it!!!

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • National/State Park
    • Safari

    Was this review helpful?

  • nora_south_africa's Profile Photo

    Prohibited

    by nora_south_africa Written Nov 25, 2011

    ROLLER SKATES, SKATEBOARDS, BICYCLES, MOTORBIKES, QUADBIKES these are prohibited anywhere in the park.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Safari

    Was this review helpful?

  • nora_south_africa's Profile Photo

    Entrance gate times

    by nora_south_africa Written Nov 25, 2011

    Please note that entrance gates close at specific times and you must be out or in your camp on time.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

Kruger National Park Hotels

Latest Kruger National Park Hotel Reviews

Londolozi Private Game Reserve
198 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 13, 2014
Lion Sands Private Game Reserve - River Lodge
293 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 7, 2014
Burchell's Bush Lodge
12 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jan 19, 2014
Skukuza Restcamp - Kruger National Park
239 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 14, 2014
Hamiltons Tented Camp
84 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 13, 2014
Lukimbi Safari Lodge
102 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 16, 2014
Sabi Sabi Bush Lodge
144 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 16, 2014
Lower Sabie Restcamp
131 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 4, 2014
Elandela Lodge
66 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 10, 2014
Berg-en-Dal
90 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Mar 21, 2014
Olifants Restcamp
124 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 3, 2014
Umlani Bushcamp
143 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 4, 2014
Pretoriuskop Restcamp
58 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 3, 2014
Camp Shawu
27 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jan 26, 2014
Satara Restcamp
147 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 11, 2014

Instant Answers: Kruger National Park

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

91 travelers online now

Comments

Kruger National Park Warnings and Dangers

Travel tips and advice posted by real travelers and Kruger National Park locals.
Map of Kruger National Park