Getting Around Sudan

  • Transportation
    by jorgejuansanchez
  • Transportation
    by jorgejuansanchez
  • The entrance to the departure hall.
    The entrance to the departure hall.
    by flynboxes

Most Viewed Transportation in Sudan

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    Hitchhiking

    by frockland Written Mar 22, 2005

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    Hitch hiking – A boksi, a truck, private cars or busses - in remote areas every vehicle will stop to pick you up. Indicate that a lift is needed and the driver will stop. Expect to pay for the lift as everybody else is doing it. Lifts are not for free.

    On major roads the situation can be different. Trucks and busses may not stop because of the road blocks and security checks.

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    Busses

    by frockland Updated Mar 22, 2005

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    Busses – Busses go everywhere! There are different type of busses with AC or without, with stops only at major destinations or everywhere. Compare the prices!

    In the case of a bus being over crowed (what is normal in the remote areas) women will find a seat inside and the men on top of the bus.

    Busses between major destination will not stop to pick someone up en route, as they have to issue a passengers lists before departure. This list will be checked at different police check points along the route.

    Busses leave usually near the markets known as Souq es Shabi

    Bus near Wad Medani
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    Boksi

    by frockland Updated Mar 22, 2005

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    A Boksi (plural Bokasi) is a Toyota pick up. Often they are the only transport to reach remote areas. They are never ever full! Its amazing how many people, animals, goods or whatever can be put in, on or attachted to such a car.
    Its also unbelievable where these vehicles manage to got to. Without differentials or 4x4 and they will mangage to reach the destination - sooner or later. Expect breakdowns. Running out of fuel, punctures or engine problems are nothing to talk about but part of the daily life while travelling in Sudan.

    A
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    Camel riding

    by grets Written Nov 23, 2004

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    One of the most exciting ways of travelling around Sudan, is on camel back. Camel riding trips can be anything from a few minutes to several days. By travelling in this way, you get an insight into what life is like for the nomads that live in these deserts, whose way of life has not changed for centuries. Camel riding is surprisingly comfortable, and a good was to take in the passing scenery at a slow pace.

    Me riding a camel
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    Tourist bus

    by grets Written Nov 23, 2004

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    Being a group of eleven with a guide, we had a small tourist bus to ourselves, which meant that we could go to any of the attractions in any order without having to rely on public transport. The bus was not airconditioned, but the windows opened to let some air in, although that did also let the dust in.

    Tourist bus

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    4WD

    by grets Written Nov 23, 2004

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    If yuo would like to see some of Sudan's sights outside Khartoum, a four wheel drive is a good idea. George at the Acropole Hotel organised a car and a driver for us to go to Meroe for the day. The cost was $240.00. Included in that price was the entrance fees, an airconditioned car, English-speaking driver, a picnic lunch and bottled water.

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    Arriving by land

    by maykal Updated Oct 19, 2004

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    Sudan has borders with many countries, but most of them are closed. The main border crossing used by tourists is the ferry between Wadi Halfa and Aswan. This is an epic journey, which sounds like an adventure but borders on the mundane, especially if you end up with no seat on the train and have to hang around in Wadi Halfa for days. See my Wadi Halfa page for my trip notes. The Eritrean border closed in November 2002 after Sudanese rebels attacked Kassala from over the border, and since then relations between the two countries have soured somewhat. There used to be direct buses between Kassala and Asmara, but the only people who cross this border nowadays are smugglers, who are rumoured to risk taking a foreigner with them for $300...take the plane, it is cheaper! Currently the Ethiopian border is open, and the easiest route is between Gedarif and Gondar...a road is being paved, but it is still a fair trek so I'm told. The west of Sudan is fairly lawless at the moment, with all the problems in Darfur, so routes to Chad and the CAR are off limits, although I did meet a German cyclist who had come from Chad after getting a Sudanese visa through not entirely legal means, so I guess it must be possible if you are brave or silly. Apparently there are buses which head to Libya across the desert from Omdurman, but it is not that uncommon for them to break down or get lost. This route is mostly travelled by those fleeing Sudan and places south on their way to Europe illegally, so a tourist would just arouse suspicion. The other borders (Kenya, Uganda, Zaire/Congo) are all closed to all but aid workers, due to the "situation" in the south of Sudan...although rumour has it that things may improve soon, now that a peace agreement has been signed. Inshallah...

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    Happy Truckin'

    by mafi_moya Updated Sep 6, 2004

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    The ultimate budget travel in Sudan is on the roof of a truck. There are trucks transporting goods right across the country and most drivers supplement their income by picking up passengers. It's not comfortable but it does give great views, a real sense of adventure and with the right fellow passengers can be quite a laugh.

    They can be unbelievably slow, which can be a nightmare considering the scenery in much of Sudan gets very monotonous. My worst truck journey was in Kordofan when it took 11 hours to travel less than 100 kms, sitting on the roof in the blazing heat with hardly any water. But you do meet some interesting people!

    Surprise surprise - more desert!
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    The good, the bad.. and the ugly!

    by mafi_moya Updated Sep 6, 2004

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    Bussing around Sudan can be quite a pleasant surprise. Between the big cities (Khartoum, Port Sudan, Kassala, El Obeid, Medani etc) the roads are fairly good (particularly the northern ones built by Osama bin Laden) and you can get luxury buses - similar to National Express in the UK. You get a meal (admittedly not very good), drinks, a TV (although after a few dodgy Egyptian soap operas you might wish it was broken), air con and comfy reserved seats. It all comes at a price naturally - varying for different companies - trips cost up to about $15 one way. There are even some great service station type rest stops, particularly on the road to El Obeid. You might get a seat on the day but it's best to book in advance. Go to Souk Shaabi in Khartoum.

    If you're on a tighter budget, or going somewhere smaller, then you'll have to go a bit more downmarket. The other buses are far more crowded, slower and much older. But even many of these aren't really that bad, particularly the minibuses.

    However, some of the larger buses are your more typical 'African' bus, with people clinging to the roof and you sharing your space with goats and chickens. They're very cheap and colourful, but not that cheerful after you've been squashed to death by a 20 stone African woman and her 10 kids, who I always seem to end up next to!

    All these are getting on!
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    Nile ferries

    by mafi_moya Updated Sep 6, 2004

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    To travel round Northern Sudan requires crossing the rivers, both the Nile and the Atbara. North of Khartoum there are no bridges so crossing relies on ferries at various stations dotted along the banks.

    The ferries are fantastic experiences - they certainly wouldn't pass safety standards back home but they can be a lot of fun. Often packed to the roof (and including lots of people on the roof!), they're used for everything from individuals going home after a shopping trip, to herds of camels, to pan-Africa trucks.

    The trucks usually get stuck trying to get up the steep banks at each side and whole villages are involved in pulling them up by rope!

    See my Nile Ferry travelogue for some more photos...

    Pulling a truck off the ferry

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    Insha'allah Airlines!

    by mafi_moya Written Sep 6, 2004

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    The national airline is Sudan Airways, also known as Insha'allah Airlines! 'God willing' it leaves on time and arrives in one piece! Last year's terrible crash aside, it's not as bad as you'd expect and as safe as most. But there are plenty of comfier options that I'd use first.

    Sudan Air is also famous for waking you up to have breakfast at 4am, just as you finally manage to get to sleep! The term 'insha'allah airlines' is reflected by the pilots and staff and it can be a bit disconcerting the number of times the pilots say 'inshallah'! Nothing wrong with having God on your side of course but it'd be nice to think the pilot had some faith in himself too!

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    How do you get in?!

    by mafi_moya Updated Sep 6, 2004

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    One of the most common questions about Sudan is just how to get in, and out. Obviously the easiest way is to fly - Khartoum is the country's only international airport and numerous airlines use it, including the national irline Sudan Airways.

    More interesting is to come by land. Nine countries border Sudan but most borders are closed. Kenya, Congo, Uganda, and usually Central African Republic are not possible due to the wars. There are frequent stories of people attempting to cross into Libya dying of thirst and heat - there are hundreds of miles of empty desert between any kind of settlement. Borders with Chad and Eritrea are sometimes open, depending on the current situation. At the time of writing both are firmly closed for the forseeable future

    The best bets are Ethiopia and Egypt. The Ethiopian border has become more reliable recently after an inconsistent period - it's a nightmare truck or bus journey though - although a new modern road is planned. The crossing via Egypt is almost always open - by ferry at Wadi Halfa over Lake Nasser.

    There's not much chance by boat and there are no public ferries over the Red Sea to Saudi Arabia, Yemen etc. Ships do dock at Port Sudan though so the more intrepid traveller might find some way to do it.

    Cross this and you can come in!
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    Arriving by air

    by maykal Written May 28, 2003

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    You'll probably arrive in Khartoum Airport, and there are a number of airlines flying from there...most of the Middle Eastern carriers, Ethiopian Airlines, and a few European ones, as well as the national carrier Sudan Airways. I arrived from London with Sudan Airways, which was an experience...the service is maybe not quite as polished as other airlines (broken TV, poor food, cramped seats, utter shambles whenever passengers are boarding or leaving during stopovers), it runs on Sudanese time (i.e. it flies at any time other than that specified on the ticket, the later the better), and it costs almost as much as better airlines...if I'd known, I could have paid an extra $30 and flown with Emirates, which I think is a slightly better airline! British Airways no longer flies here, but Air France and Lufthansa do apparently. The cheapest tickets from Europe are with Yemenia (one of my favourites for sheer entertainment), Egyptair and Qatar Airways.

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    As in most African countries...

    by VoVan Written Aug 26, 2002

    As in most African countries taxi drivers are very careful about their century-old toyotas and use them till the car brakes into pieces. It would be a good experience to have couple rides. I just didn't dare to ride a three-wheel vehicle. :)

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    I went to Sudan by Air France...

    by Narviking Written Aug 25, 2002

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    I went to Sudan by Air France flight from Paris to Khartoum.
    In Sudan I took the bus from Khartoum to Port Sudan.
    It was a strange experience.... The bus was OK but the front lights was broken. After a few hours driving it became dark and the bus had to stop and wait for the sun to rise the next the morning so it could continue ! The bus was completely full of people and we were not allowed to stay inside the bus during the night. So all passengers slept on the ground outside the bus in the middle of the country-side.... I returned from Port Sudan to Khartoum by Sudan Airways. Did the plane leave in time ? NOOO!!
    As soon as we had enter the plane the electricity at Port Sudan Airport went out. So the plane couldnt leave. We were then told to get out of the plane and into the terminal building. After an hour or so the electrisity came back and we enter the plane once again. Then suddenly the electrisity went out again !
    This time we were told to remain in the plane and we were served food and something to drink. Finally after another hour or so the electrisity came back and the plane could leave. During the flight itself we got nothing to drink or eat ofcourse. We had already been served food while waiting on the runway.
    The first time I had the meal served and eaten before takeoff.... THE PHOTO: OUR BUS MAKES A STOP OUTSIDE THE TOWN OF KASSALA NEAR THE ERITREAN BORDER

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Sudan Hotels

See all 20 Hotels in Sudan
  • Al Salam Rotana Hotel

    Africa Road, P.O. Box 12290, Khartoum, Sudan

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Couples

  • Baasher Hotel

    Port Sudan, 79800, Sudan

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Couples

  • Dembesh Hotel Juba

    I stayed in this hotel for one month on May 2013. I have honestly found it to be the best hotel in...

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Sudan Transportation

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