Omdurman Things to Do

  • tray ready to eat
    tray ready to eat
    by awladhassan
  • The Baladiya
    The Baladiya
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  • from the back
    from the back
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Most Recent Things to Do in Omdurman

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    The Camel market

    by awladhassan Updated Oct 11, 2009

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    tray ready to eat

    The Camel Market is within walking distance of Omdurman market to the north . Here camels are bought and sold, as well as donkeys,goats and cattle.
    When buying a camel, note that light coloured or white camels are preferred. A camel can cost between $500 and $1200 depending on whether it is for transporting goods or for racing.
    But, it is also where camel meat can be found. We had an enjoyable meal of camel liver. It can be eaten raw, or covered with peanut paste [dukwa] or fried for a few seconds. Whichever way, it is crunchy and delicious.

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    The Municipality Building the Baladiya

    by uglyscot Updated Oct 3, 2008

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    The Baladiya

    This is one of the earliest buildings made after Independence in 1956.
    It is made of brick, and its clock tower was once a distinguishing mark .
    On the side of the main building was a huge crocodile shot in the 1960s, but it has now decayed and an advertising slogan has replaced it- a sign of the times!
    At one time the wreck s of cars involved in horrendous accidents would be on show outside as warnings to drivers.

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    See the Nilain Mosque

    by uglyscot Updated Sep 8, 2008

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    the dome
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    This modern mosque [1980s] was built from the design of a student at the Faculty of Architecture.Its aluminium dome was produced from aluminium from the smelter at Invergordon in Scotland, near from where I come from.
    The mosque lies almost at the junction of the Blue and White Nile.The complex also contains libraries, teaching centres and administration buildings.
    The dome is unusual, and inside are fine mosaics, though , as a woman, I haven't been inside to see.However I have been inside the grounds to have a closer look from the back.

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    Old fortifications

    by uglyscot Updated Sep 7, 2008

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    fortifications by Nile
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    Beside the Nile in Omdurman near what was the gate to Omdurman, can be seen the mud-brick fortifications where the Mahdi's troops fired on the British steamers coming down the Nile from Egypt with messages and supplies for the British forces. These are one of the few historic remains still to be seen dating to the Mahdist era.

    Unfortunately quality of pictures not the best as taken from moving car.
    Update: As of Sept. 2008 I find the fortifications enclosed by railings and a new Night Family Park being constructed along side!

    In the Khalifa's house museum is a painting showing what the fortifications would have been like when in use.

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    See the Nilain Mosque

    by yurxlnc Updated Mar 19, 2007

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    Nilain window
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    Tje Nilain mosque is situated near the Nile just after the confluence of the Blue Nile and the White Nile. It has an unusual dome. There are several outbuildings.
    Inside there is a wonderful view of the Nile and Omdurman bridge from the many windows inside the mosque.

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    The Khalifa's bath

    by uglyscot Updated Mar 14, 2007

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    The bath
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    The house of Um Kalthoum is a later addition to the Khalifa's house. The water came from a well inside the house and an aqueduct was ingeniously built to allow the water to be fed to the tank by gravity. It was lifted up to the boiler , and thence to the simple Turkish style bathtub. Water would have been carried up the outside stairs and poured down by servants into the tank. The taps of both the bath and sink are ‘gold’ in colour. the roof of the bathroom is dome-shaped with holes cut out to enable light to enter.
    Next to the bath room itself is a raised slab where massage would have been done.
    There were later additions to the original building which was re-used by the British District Commissioner 1899-1921.

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    see the Khalifa's belongings in museum

    by uglyscot Updated Mar 14, 2007

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    hats and  clothing of the Khalifa.
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    Among the items belonging to the Khalifa are:
    clothes which seem very thick and heavy for the climate of Sudan today, but maybe it was protective.
    His desk and stick, his bed made from Indian wood, drum and large gudda [ a wooden bowl for serving food from There are also brass ewers and other metal containers.,

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    Khalifa House Museum 2: Exhibits of vehicles

    by uglyscot Updated Mar 14, 2007

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    early carriages
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    Inside the entrance are some of the first wheeled vehicles to be used in the Sudan. They are made of wood. There are two horse drawn carriages and a third, a Victoria, which arrived from Cairo via the Darab el Arbain [the 40 day way] sent to Sultan Hussein of Darfur. It was found by Zubair Pasha at El Fasher. Later Ismail Ayoub, governor of Sudan [1875-1877] sent it to Khartoum. It was never used.
    The first motorised vehicle was the car belonging to Gen Wingate. it was made in Scotland.

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    Khalifa's House Museum

    by uglyscot Updated Mar 14, 2007

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    An Ansar, follower of the Mahdi
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    The house was built by Hamed AbdelNur under guidance from an Italian named Pietro. The main building was constructed 1887-8. The double storey house was built in 1891. Opposite is the Mahdi’s tomb built 1886-87.
    Of the old city wall built to enclose the dwellings of the Melazzmin ,nothing remains but the southern gate..

    The courtyard entrance was built of large stones originally from Khartoum. The hand-puddled bricks came from the Christian church at Soba East..

    The house of Um Kalthoum is a later edition. The water came from a well inside the house and an aqueduct was ingeniously built to allow the water to be fed to the tank by gravity. It was lifted up to the boiler with a furnace, and thence to the simple Turkish style bathtub. Water would have been carried up the outside stairs and poured down by servants into the tank. The taps of both the bath and sink are ‘gold’.
    There were later additions to the original building which was re-used by the British district Commissioner 1899-1921.

    The boiler for heating the water, and a channel for taking the waste water from the house to a well can be seem.
    A huge pair of millstones and the wooden post are also there.

    A visit is highly recommended and would not take more than an hour or two to see.

    The house itself is interesting as there is an enormous bath for which servants carried buckets of hot water . There is the first automobile used in the Sudan; a large angareb [bed] on which all the pupils of a khalwa slept- reminiscent of the Great bed of Ware in the UK.
    There are letters sent by General Gordon to his sisters, as well as lots of other memorabilia.

    It is open mornings until about 1pm except Fridays.
    Price of ticket 100SD

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    The Mahdi's tomb

    by uglyscot Updated Mar 14, 2007

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    Although it is not possible to visit the Mahdi's tomb itself, it stands as a landmark with its silver dome. However, nearby is the Khalifa's House museum and a model of the dome is on display inside.
    The dome is visible from a long way off because of its 'silver' colour..
    The original tomb was destroyed at the time of the British occupation, by Kitchener's gunboats . The family were not given permission to rebuild it, but it was later rebuilt by the Mahdi's posthumous son Sayed Abdel Rahman el Mahdi at his own expense..

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    see the boat building

    by uglyscot Written Feb 27, 2007

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    boat building

    Along the Nile in Omdurman there is the Mowrada where there is a fish market. Further along from that are all sorts of salesman, but what caught my eye was a small area where boats were being carved out of wood in the traditional way.

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    Cross Omdurman bridge

    by uglyscot Written Nov 20, 2006

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    on the bridge
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    The old metal bridge from Khartoum to Omdurman was brought by the British from India in about 1910. It once had trams as well as cars and people using it. Until the new Ingaz bridge was built by the Chinese it was the only way to cross the Nile. When I was teaching at the Faculty of Education the bridge had to stop bases and public transport because of the volume of traffic going to Khartoum. The bridge would have only one lane open from 9am -10.am and again at the afternoon rush hour.
    In the rainy season the islands under the bridge are drowned , but later after they dry out they are farms with vegetables growing.

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    Visit Omdurman market

    by uglyscot Updated Nov 18, 2006

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    busy market
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    The market in Omdurman is basically an open air market though there are shops whose wares spill out onto the street. Some salesmen have their goods on a sheet of cardboard or plastic on the road. It is place full of colour and life, with a whole spectrum of people from all walks of life, ethnic groups and nationalities.
    There are some streets devoted to a certain commoditiy, but there are also overlaps.: Gold street, spice street, mattress street, clothes street etc/.

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    Derwishes

    by Mustravel Written Jul 13, 2004

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    Meeting a lot of Western people (mainly Germans) is possible while looking at the whirling derwishes on every Friday afternoon in Omdurman, after the asr prayer (around 4.30 pm untill dark).
    It all takes places on a huge cemetry with in the middle a mosque, which is the tomb of a very important Sjeich, who lived in Sudan centuries ago. To some muslims this all sounds weird, since according to some it's forbidden to pray on the graves of people and honouring a Sjeich like the Catholics would honour a Saint. Throughout the week you will find men and women coming there to ask the Sjeich for help. Most of these believers don't put themselves in a different box, but by more critical believers who judge this as being 'haraam' (forbidden), these muslims are called Sufis.
    Just have a good time watching these derwishes... And don't take too many pictures, you can't catch the atmosphere on a picture....

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    If you want to buy a camel...

    by mafi_moya Updated Oct 31, 2003

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    Camel market

    Near Souk Libya is Omdurman's main camel market. They're always glad to see foreigners and will often give you a ride on one of the camels. Not sure what the going rate is for your own one though and I hear they make lousy pets. If you like eating new foods then you can buy camel meat here, but it's quite expensive and you have to buy in bulk - generally a whole camel!

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