Dar es Salaam Transportation

  • Bus to Dar es Salaam
    Bus to Dar es Salaam
    by georeiser
  • Inside the bus
    Inside the bus
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  • The bus in Dar es Salaam
    The bus in Dar es Salaam
    by georeiser

Most Recent Transportation in Dar es Salaam

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    Bus from Mombasa to Dar es Salaam

    by georeiser Written Apr 1, 2013

    The bus from Mombasa to Dar es Salaam takes 8-10 hrs and costs 15 USD. Its recommended to buy your bus ticket some hours or a day in advance to get a good seat.

    The bus stops at the border waiting for passengers to arrange visa and immigration. In the city of Tanga you have to change bus, so keep your ticket ready. Another long stop is made at the intersection of the Segara, when the bus wait for corresponding passengers from Moshi/Arusha.

    The road from Horohoro border station to the city of Tanga is a boring stretch of way without ocean view. And the inland road after Tanga is even more boring, but fast. On the way you pass the towns Ngomeni, Muheza, Hale and Segara. Then the bus drives to Mkata, Manga, Mandera, Msata, Chalinze, before turning left on the Morogoro highway towards the towns of Mlandizi, Kibaha and finally Dar es Salaam.

    If you have good time there are also other ways to Dar es Salaam. From Tanga you can choose to take the old, slow road along the coast. Ask for a private car or Bodaboda to the town of Kigombe. From there drive to Pangani, Bweni, Mwera, Ushongo, Mkwaja (bad road), Mligaji, Saadani, Kinyonga. The last road from Bagamoyo to Dar es Salaam is good.

    Bus to Dar es Salaam
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    Very nice planes and great pilots

    by Penelope4 Written Feb 12, 2010

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    The two most popular planes in Tanzania are Precision Air and Tanzanian Airways. I flew Precision Air and had a great time.

    Direct flight from Dar to Arusha is 1 hour 20 minutes.

    From Arusha to Dar with a stopover in Zanzibar is 2 hours 1o minutes.

    I had to pay with credit card and I was charged a total of US$ 283 for the roundtrip.

    Precision serves drinks and a pack of cashew nights during my onward trip to Arusha. On the way back, as it was lunch time, I got beef sandwich and a Coke.

    The stewardesses are not very customer-oriented. I noticed that two passengers tried to ask something and they did not attend to them right away.

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    Dar es Salaam airport (DAR)

    by georeiser Updated Jul 7, 2009

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    Arriving at "Julius Nyere Intl. airport in Dar es Salaam is convenient. It's a small airport.

    VISA ON ARRIVAL:
    Shortly before before the passport and immigration desk, you find the "visa on arrival" counter on the right side. Pick an arrival card and a visa form, and fill out. Deliver it, 50 USD and the passport to the officer behind the counter, and line up in front of the web camera. Your visa is ready 5 minutes later.

    ARRIVAL AREA:
    After the imigration and customs you will pass through a door to an open-air arrival area. It's a lot of people here, so take care of your belongings. Toalet and a money changer is located outside.

    TAXI:
    The Taxi drivers will ask you where you shall go, and will claim a high price they say is a fixed price. Remember to bargain that price.

    Dar es Salaam airport (DAR) Dar es Salaam airport (DAR) Dar es Salaam airport (DAR) Dar es Salaam airport (DAR) Dar es Salaam airport (DAR)
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    Bajaji, Tuk-tuk taxi

    by georeiser Updated Jan 30, 2009

    The 3 wheels taxis (Tuk-Tuk) are everywhere in Dar es Salaam. It is a cheap and funny way to get around. They are also smaller than cars and can drive in the most narrow and bumpy roads. The Tanzanian people call them Bajajis.

    Bajaji in Dar es Salaam Bajajis in Dar es Salaam Bajaji in Dar es Salaam Bajaji in Dar es Salaam Bajaji in Dar es Salaam
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    Ferry from/to Zanzibar

    by georeiser Updated Jan 24, 2009

    It is easy to take a ferry between Dar es Salaam and the islands in the nearby. Several ferries operate between Dar es Salaam and Stonetown, Zanzibar. You will find slow or fast ferries.

    Because you are a tourist you have to pay 2-3 times more for the ticket than the local people.

    Ferry to Zanzibar Ferry to Zanzibar Ferry to Zanzibar Ferry to Zanzibar Ferry to Zanzibar
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    Busses are very interesting!

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Apr 29, 2007

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    After hitch-hiking from central Zambia to Mbeya, Tanzania near the border, I decided to catch one of the local busses from there. It was while waiting for the Zambia/Tanzania border post to open in the morning that I met up with my new Austrian travelling buddy, Josef, shown examining the beaches of Dar in the 3rd photo. The other view of the bus terminal was taken after we had boarded our long-distance bus, with my backpack thrown up onto the roof like everyone else. Although the drive to Dar es Salaam took about 20 hours, we were able to take-in beautiful countryside on the way as our route passed through Iringa and Morogoro. For meals, like most passengers, I was content to buy cooked treats off the locals in towns along the way as they rushed up to the open windows when we pulled into various stops.

    That trip worked out so well that I also took a bus from Dar es Salaam to Moshi, at the foot of Mt. Kilimanjaro. This one was not quite as enjoyable, thanks to a 10-hour delay in our departure, which meant that we rolled into Moshi at 2 AM. I had no idea where anything was or where my buddies lived, so I ended up spending the night under the stars in my sleeping bag, spread out on a big lawn beside the sidewalk - awaking to locals staring at me in the morning as they went about their business!

    Busy bus terminal in Mbeya, Tanzania Another view of the Mbeya bus terminal area Josef has a look at the coastline
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  • Bwana_Brown's Profile Photo

    It was a long way from home!

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Mar 22, 2007

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    Upon graduation from university in Fredericton with my electrical engineering degree, I had already decided that I just wanted to travel and see the world. Not having any actual job experience, about the only option available was to volunteer for a 2-year contract job in the developing world, organized by the Canadian University Service Overseas (CUSO), an organization funded by the Canadian government (similar to the American 'Peace Corps' or the British 'Volunteer Service Overseas'). The title was a bit of a mis-nomer, because everyone had already finished their formal education when they joined. All successful applicants were to be paid the same wages a similarly qualified local would get for their particular job. On my application, I simply specified 'Africa' as my desired location and after they did the usual cursory psychological tests (apparently I'm not crazy after all!), I was soon confirmed as a lecturer in electrical subjects at the Zambia Institute of Technology in Luanshya, Zambia. After reporting to the University of Western Ontario to undergo 2-weeks of preparations with the remainder of the 1972 batch of 110 recruits, we were taken to Toronto to fly out together via a chartered Air Canada 'stretched' DC-8.

    It was a fantastic way to have my first overseas flight - with a bunch of mates and free drinks served the whole way! We watched the Atlantic Ocean go past and landed in Zurich, Switzerland to refuel. Because we were not even allowed off the aircraft, I stood in the open doorway to take in the Alps and at least breathe the fresh air before we were off again. Over the Mediterranean and then it seemed like nothing but the Sahara Desert below us for hours - I remember being awed by its size because we were travelling at 550 mph! Finally, touch down in Dar es Salaam in the darkness - it did not matter, I was in Africa at last!

    In Toronto's departure lounge with the Group Our chartered Air Canada 'stretch DC-8'
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    No complaints about air connections

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Mar 21, 2007

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    Following our initial 2-day indroduction to Africa, we headed back to the International Airport where members of our group went their separate ways to the various countries to which they had been assigned. Some had last minute changes because it had been decided that those slated for Uganda would not go there because this was during the upheaval when 'Big Daddy' Idi Amin created turmoil there by evicting the East Indian population from the country. The same thing happened regarding Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), where the 'bush war' against white supremacy also broke out in 1972. To make things worse, one member of our party who had been due to head there was named Ian Smith - the same name as the leader of the breakaway white-ruled colony! During my 1973 return to Tanzania, I spent a couple of nights with him in his new posting of Moshe, at the foot of Mt. Kilimanjaro.

    This is the airport scene that greeted us from the outside departure upper deck as we prepared to leave. Only later did I realize that these two airplanes are among the most famous work-horses in the world! The Canadian-built de Havilland Twin Otter (left) is a very rugged bush plane, used in all conditions. It is renowned for the missions flown by a Canadian company to the South Pole in both 2001 and 2003, to rescue sick researchers based there. With the winter temperature reaching a high of only -57 C (-70 F), the normally-used American military Hercules aircraft were unable to deal with the conditions. I ended up flying in Twin Otters a few times to remote jungle locations a few years later while working in Papua New Guinea. At right is another workhorse, a Dutch-built Fokker F-27 Friendship, a type which I also used many times on scheduled Air Niugini flights to various airstrips all over PNG. The first flight for this model took place in 1955 and it saw service worldwide over the following decades. With 793 of these aircraft having been produced until the early-1980s, it became the most successful turboprop airliner in history.

    'Twin Otter' & 'Friendship' at Dar's airport
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    Transfer between Airport Terminals

    by Mark_12 Updated Mar 16, 2006

    Note that the main international terminal building and the terminal building handling some of the domestic flights at DAR are not within easy walking distance of each other (unless you have backpacks and at least half an hour). One should allow for time to get between them if tranferring between domestic and international terminals.

    We were able to negotiate the cost of a taxi ride to 3000 TSH.

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    MATATU or DALA DALA

    by Rawicz Written Mar 4, 2003

    The main bus station is at Ubungo Dar es Salaam, but buses to most parts of the country leave from a variety of places within the city.
    MATATU = African style shared taxi or minibus or pick-up. Cheap and colourful servicing many city destinations as well as outlying routes. In Tanzania, these are known as 'dala dala' (the equivalent of the Kenyan 'matatu'). A 'dala dala' is a mini-bus, but basically a mid-sized van, with about fifteen seats. At peak periods though, these vans will accommodate up to twice as many passengers - sitting, leaning inside, and occasionally hanging out the side door. They always found room for one more.

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    Ferry Boats

    by Rawicz Written Feb 28, 2003

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    Mainly available in the Indian Ocean making links with Tanzania Offshore Islands of Zanzibar, Pemba and Mafia, as well as main ports of Tanga, Mtwara and Dar es Salaam. But there are also short distance ferries like the Kigamboni ferry which crosses the mouth of Dar-es-Salaam harbour. Kigamboni is a fishing village on the south side of the harbour.

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    Airport:Be prepared for the queue outside check-in

    by londonbabe Written Feb 6, 2003

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    If you are using Dar as your arrival point for Zanzibar or the interior, when you come out of international arrivals you must cross the courtyard to the departures hall on the right hand side. There will be a long queue waiting to get in, because the security machines are about 6 feet inside the door. Don't panic - the queue moves quite quickly, and you can use the time for people watching.
    I don't recommend the cafeteria in the departures lounge - snacks may make you ill.

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    All roads are going to Dar

    by Rawicz Written Jan 29, 2003

    To most travellers, Dar es Salaam is just a convenient port of call on the way to more exotic destinations of Zanzibar, the game parks, Pemba or Mafia Islands. This is a great pity, because “Dar”, as it is affectionately called by aficionados of the city, is a fascinating rabbit warren of a tropical port, often surprising the unwary wanderer with scenes of breathtaking beauty. While Dodoma has been (somewhat absurdly) appointed as the new capital of Tanzania, Dar is the real capital, a hustling, bustling seaport that straddles some of the most important sea routes on earth.

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    This is coolest night view of...

    by Geeque Updated Aug 25, 2002

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    This is coolest night view of Dar es salaaam Harbour or locally known as Bandari ya Dar es salaaam. Daladala is the major and cheapest way to get around Dar es salaam. Cabs and car rentals might also be helpful.

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    BUSESBuses are a good mean...

    by SirRichard Written Aug 25, 2002

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    BUSES

    Buses are a good mean of transport in this part of Africa, besides a real experience by itself. We took this bus from Moshi to Dar es Salaam. We went to the bus station early in the morning, there were several buses, and we went into one of them, but none could tell us the time of departure. We waited and waited and it only departured after one hour, when the bus was completely full!! The bus had a nice TV but they only showed videos of african singers, which is quite interesting the first 30 minutes... but the travel took more than 7 hours!!!

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