Kilimanjaro National Park Favorites

  • View to Mt Meru
    View to Mt Meru
    by fishandchips
  • My training area near Christchurch
    My training area near Christchurch
    by fishandchips
  • Sun coming up over Africa
    Sun coming up over Africa
    by fishandchips

Most Recent Favorites in Kilimanjaro National Park

  • fishandchips's Profile Photo

    Training to get to the Top

    by fishandchips Updated Dec 10, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    My training area near Christchurch

    Favorite thing: It's a curious thing that many of the people that you meet on Kili have done little preparation given that many decide on the spur of the moment to 'have a go'. My advice is to do a bit of preparation as there is quite a bit of walking to be done. Summit day alone can be 12 hours or so on your legs!

    I'm lucky in that my very flat city of Christchurch, New Zealand, has hills (Port Hills) right beside it. These are by no means the same as going up Kili however they provide plenty of scope to get used to walking for several hours including lots of uphill work.

    I started off easy and walked for approx 2 hours building up to 5 hour walks at the end. This was over approx 12 weeks - possibly a bit of overkill though it really helped my legs to stay strong the whole time on the mountain.

    As I said, you'll be on your legs for long periods of time even though you are walking slowly (pole pole) to help your gradual adjustment to the ever increasing altitude. Be ready!

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • fishandchips's Profile Photo

    The Challenge Ahead

    by fishandchips Written Dec 10, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The final leg of your journey - up the big slope!!

    Favorite thing: From Kibo hut the Marangu track gets rather steep - near Gilman's point it's very steep!

    It's both a scary and exciting feeling looking up at the last leg of your journey. Not too far to go but the track looks very challenging - how will we do it? Basically it's several hours of zig zagging across the face of the very large scree slope you can see in the photo.

    During daylight hours the track is unstable (being lots of stones & all that) so you walk up during the dark and very cold hours so that the track binds together and is much easier to go up.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing

    Was this review helpful?

  • fishandchips's Profile Photo

    Team support

    by fishandchips Written Sep 18, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The team

    Favorite thing: No matter which route you take or what your approach is you will most likely be part of a team as you attempt to reach Kili's peak. I found that my team of 4 worked really well together (2 Kiwi's and 2 Aussie's) and helped each other to all get to the top. Small things such as rehydration salts and carbo gels were shared as we all had our moments of doubt through sickness including altitude related. Add to this the care and help from our guides who had ginger tea provided on a couple of mornings to help settle dodgy stomach's and their patient approach to issues and we were in really good spirits for the last leg of the trek.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • fishandchips's Profile Photo

    Hitting 5000M

    by fishandchips Written Sep 18, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    William's Point

    Favorite thing: Each step up the mountain was taking me higher than I had ever been before once we had left Mandara Hut. At William's point the 5km mark is hit and this was a real lift for me - going above 5km and still feeling okay - I knew I'd make it after this!

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • fishandchips's Profile Photo

    Sunrise at Gilman's Point

    by fishandchips Written Sep 18, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sun coming up over Africa

    Favorite thing: I can't express the elation I felt getting here though it was nothing compared with getting to Uhuru Peak. Given 2 night throwing up and not expecting to make it to Kibo Hut I was rather emotional getting to the top!!

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Pablos_new's Profile Photo

    Pole-Pole

    by Pablos_new Updated Jul 8, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Pole-Pole

    Favorite thing: "Pole-Pole" means slowly-slowly! This is the most popular word in Swahili after "Jambo" that you will hear at Kili.
    The main task of you guides will be to stop you from running or fast walking in first two days. This is forbidden in mountains.

    Fondest memory: On the third day (on photo) you will not be able to move other way than pole-pole. So, from an order it becomes your moto!

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing

    Was this review helpful?

  • grahamopey's Profile Photo

    choosing a company

    by grahamopey Written Mar 11, 2008

    Favorite thing: I found that prices varied wildly, we ended up doing the climb with ‘the Africa walking company’ who are affiliated with Africa travel resources. Their service was good although some of the equipment was a little shabby, not that it was awful you understand, it was things like zips sticking on our tents, running out of powdered milk and battered sleeping mats that get annoying after a while. I would recommend them although I am not 100% that you could do better.
    In terms of pricing, some companies do ludicrous things like provide oxygen tents and solar showers. Not only are these luxuries virtually useless on the mountain they also require additional porters to carry them (and in the case of the shower, fetch litres of water possibly over long distances) at additional costs to you.
    Then there is the tricky business of porter’s tips. It can be incredibly difficult to glean any information regarding tips from these companies beforehand. They all have the information and some will hand you a sheet of tip recommendations the night before the climb. Some places claim to pay their porters well whilst I am not so sure. In terms of tips for porters this is what we paid out:
    Ordinary porters: 10,000 TSH (x 14)
    Experienced porters: US$ 10 (x2)
    Chef: $30 (x1)
    Assistant guides: $40 (x2)
    Head guide: $70 (x1)

    This should be a consideration when choosing your company.

    In short check what you are getting for your money. I was put off MEM tours and tropical trails by a Kilimanjaro veteran, although both companies seemed to be getting people to the summit adequately whilst we were there and we had a wonderful safari with tropical trails.
    An excellent source of information is http://www.climbmountkilimanjaro.com/

    You can find my summit picture here:

    http://www.climbmountkilimanjaro.com/the-kilimanjaro-hall-of-fame/graham-openshaw-and-debbie-woods/index.html

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing

    Was this review helpful?

  • versoverita's Profile Photo

    Kilimanjaro Route Acclimatization

    by versoverita Written Dec 2, 2006

    Favorite thing: I would recommend that one choose 6 or 7 days to acclimatize instead of the standard 5 days (plus Diamox). I have only taken the standard Marangu Route and it is nice trekking but goes against acclimatization tables by speeding up the ascent;which does lead to more hikers getting altitude illness.

    Fondest memory: The view from Uhuru Peak!

    Related to:
    • Mountain Climbing

    Was this review helpful?

  • swinny's Profile Photo

    Hiking to the top of Africa

    by swinny Written Aug 25, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: We had a wonderfully successful climb on Kilimanjaro in August of 2000. If you're coming from the States, DO NOT hire a guide company in the United States. That is, unless you're really rich and you don't mind being charged over double what it would cost you to book with a Tanzanian company. This is because no matter who you hire in the US, they still have to turn around and hire local guides and porters in Tanzania, it's the law. We spent $650.00 per person for a 6 day climb of the Marangu Route. That included all food, lodging, and transportation to and from the mountain from Moshi. US companies were charging $1500.00/person at the time for the same route. We used Zara Tanzania Tours, easily contacted through the Internet at http://www.kilimanjaro.co.tz/kilimanjaro.htm. At the time, they were the ONLY local guide service recommended by the Kilimanjaro National Park. We highly recommend them, our guide was awesome and the food was great.

    Fondest memory: Standing at Gilman's Point, feeling like I was going to vomit, pass out and die all at the same time. I wanted to quit, but our guide urged me on, "Sir, it's only 2 more hours to Uhuru Point, you must at least try. I'll even carry your pack if you need." Fortunately I pressed on and made it. (With my pack)

    Was this review helpful?

  • Gard's Profile Photo

    How much does it cost?

    by Gard Written Feb 16, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In Goretex at Shira

    Favorite thing: There is no doubt that does cost to climb a mountain like Kilimanjaro. In the table below I have tried to summarize what I spent on this trip and I have tried to take everything into account (equipment, transportation, costs for the trekking on the mountain). We choose to go for Marangu hotel as a tour guide and they are not the cheapest but I think we made a right decision. Another variable is the cost of equipment. How much stuff have you got and how much do you have to buy to be prepared for this trip?

    Transportation
    Stavanger - Nairobi 1010
    Nairobi - Kilimanjaro airport 300
    Transport (to/from hotel) 62

    Trekking and hotel
    Cost for the trekking 570
    Accomodation (3 nights) 90
    Park fees 410

    Equipment
    Clothing 810
    Misc equipment 365
    Medicine/Toiletries 185

    Total Approx. 3800 US dollars

    Was this review helpful?

  • Gard's Profile Photo

    Prepare yourself - start planning

    by Gard Written Feb 16, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Kilimanjaro book I bought

    Favorite thing: In early July 2003 I decided that this was something that I wanted to do and from there I moved on to the planning phase. I didn’t know much about the Kilimanjaro trekking to start with but luckily there are trip reports to be found on the internet. In addition to reading stuff on the net I bought a book from Trailblazer (Kilimanjaro - A trekking guide to Africa's highest mountain by Henry Stedman). This book was pretty nice to have because it dealt with all sorts of topics such as what to bring, how to get there, which tour guides to use, description of the different routes and so on. This is a great way to start planning your trip.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Gard's Profile Photo

    Toilets of Kilimanjaro

    by Gard Written Feb 16, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    First toilet we came to on Kilimanjaro

    Favorite thing: The toilets along the Machame route are the squatting kinds. Some of the ones on the route were in bad need of being emptied but the ones at the camps were "ok" (if you can use such a word). Remember to bring along toilet paper and a head lamp also makes it easier to find and do your business at the toilet at night :-) Wet wipes is another great invention which is nice to bring along on a trip like this.

    Was this review helpful?

  • jackfruit's Profile Photo

    What if you are a vegetarian?

    by jackfruit Written Feb 3, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Veggie Plate @ Mandara Hut on the way down

    Favorite thing: All tour companies that do Kili tours will cater to vegetarian clients, so dont sweat.

    A typical breakfast consists of whole grain hot porridge, toast with jam, omlettes, sausage links, carrot sticks and cucumber.
    Sometimes fruits are included. Tea and coffee beverages are also offered.

    Lunch is usually packed in a small plastic bag and will contain vegetable sticks, fried chicken, boiled egg, toasted sandwich with tomato and cheese, bottled juice and of course, dont forget to chug down that water!!!

    Dinner is a 3 course affair with soup (usually vegetable or cabbage), sauteed vegetables (cabbage or carrots or a mixture), rice or chaptis and bread, beef/chicken/veggie curry and fruit (mango, pineapple, orange, banana) for dessert

    Of course if you are vegetarian be sure to mention this to the tour agent and they will subsitute the meat offering with a vegetarian one.

    We were a mix of vegetarian and meat eaters in the group and all of us left the mountain, overfed and feeling like we ate like royalty the entire week on Kili!

    Also note that since caffeine interfers with the body's ability to process oxygen at high altitudes, its best to keep away from high caffeinated drinks. Tea and coffee in small quantities should be ok.

    Was this review helpful?

  • jackfruit's Profile Photo

    Power Plugs for Tanzania

    by jackfruit Updated Jan 30, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: If you are bringing your digicam to Kili, you will most definetly want to charge it completly the night before the start of trek.

    Tanzania uses 220V 50Hz power supplies. Most digital camera power adapters are compatible with both 110V and 220V supplies, so that should not be a bother. But make sure you have the correct power plug with you.

    http://www.walkabouttravelgear.com/c_tanz.htm lists all the different power plugs for Tanzania.

    Fondest memory: Picture perfect mountain!

    Was this review helpful?

  • jackfruit's Profile Photo

    Where to stay at the base of Kili?

    by jackfruit Updated Jan 29, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: There are a number of accomodation choices in Marangu, Moshi, Arusha, etc. Where you will stay the night before starting the trek, should be planned based on the route you choose. Otherwise you might spend most of the first day driving to the trailhead instead of enjoying those same hours on the majestic mountain!

    For Marangu Route, unless you are based in Marangu Village, it is a minimum 1 hr drive to the trail head from Moshi and upwards of 2 hrs from Arusha to the Marangu Gate. For the Rongai Route starting from Moshi, add another 2 1/2 hrs to this to get to the trailhead on the northeastern side of Kili after registering at Marangu Gate.

    For Machame Route, it is about a 45 min drive from Moshi to the trailhead at Machame village.

    For Lemosho Route, it is a 2 1/2 hr drive from Moshi to the Londorossi Park Gate.

    We stayed at the Springlands Hotel in Moshi for our Marangu Route trek.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Kilimanjaro National Park

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

84 travelers online now

Comments

Kilimanjaro National Park Favorites

Reviews and photos of Kilimanjaro National Park favorites posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Kilimanjaro National Park sightseeing.

View all Kilimanjaro National Park hotels