Kilimanjaro National Park What to Pack

  • Sorting the bags for the porters to carry
    Sorting the bags for the porters to...
    by hayward68
  • Unpacking the vehicle before the trek
    Unpacking the vehicle before the trek
    by hayward68
  • Osprey Talon 22 with 2 litre bladder
    Osprey Talon 22 with 2 litre bladder
    by fishandchips

Most Recent What to Pack in Kilimanjaro National Park

  • hayward68's Profile Photo

    Some Essentials

    by hayward68 Updated Jun 29, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Unpacking the vehicle before the trek

    Luggage and bags: Do not bring a wheeled bag; a duffel bag or backpack is preferable as the porters will carry them on their head or back of their neck. I used a duffel bag which had hidden backpack straps, needed lots of souvenier room. You'll also want a dayback in which you'll carry your day to day essentials like your water, sunscreen and camera.

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Hiking boots, well broken in. A pair of running shoes to change into once we reached camp.
    Wet weather gear; waterproof breathable raincoat/pants. Down mitts are great.
    A few base layer shirts, and a couple of long sleeve ones, one was merino wool, keeps you warm even if you're wet. Don't pack cotton t-shirts, go for ones that wick the sweat from your body. I had 2 zip-up fleece jackets, perfect to help you warm up or cool down.
    A down coat that packed down small for high altitudes, you'll want to bundle up the higher up you get.
    A brimmed hat is useful and also a warm winter hat.
    Sunglasses are essential!
    Long underwear! Ladies, there is zip crotch long underwear available which means you can keep somewhat covered up, helpful when you're on the trail.
    Sock liners which go under your hiking socks, help to reduce possibility of blisters, also meant you didn't have to bring so many bulky hiking socks. Sock liners are thinner and pack into less space.

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: High SPF sunscreen, absolutely essential! Even our guide and porters were slathering on sunscreen. Remember to reapply on your nose if you blow your nose using kleenex, I forgot and burned the edges of my nostrils.
    If wind and cold makes your nose run, you'll want to pack quite a few packs.
    Baby wipes, perfect to keep you clean on the hike, otherwise it's just the bowl of hot water at the end of your hike and beginning of your day.
    Toilet paper/wet wipes, there's none provided in the pit toilets and nowhere to wash your hands afterwards. Antiseptic hand cleaner gel is a good thing to bring along as well.
    One item I found great for women for when Mother Nature called and you needed to pee was something called Sani-Fem Freshette which basically allows women to pee like men ;-) so helpful when you're stuck on the trail with nowhere to hide or it's too cold to drop your trousers. Also meant that, like the guys, you can use a pee bottle in your tent, no stumbling through the dark to those pit toilets.

    Photo Equipment: Pack enough batteries to last your entire hike and enough memory cards for your digital camera, though you might not take as many pics as you think you will, you'll be too busy hiking.

    Camping/Beach/Outdoor Gear: Down sleeping bag, preferably at least a three season one. You want to be warm enough to sleep at those cold camps. A self-inflating air mattress, you really won't have the breath to blow up a mattress once you get to high altitude. Bring one of those pillow sacks that you stuff with your clothes. You can either bring your own hiking poles or rent them in town.

    Miscellaneous: Bring at least 2 1 Litre water bottles and insulated bags for them if you have them. The insulated bags will help keep the water from freezing at high altitude. Our porters boiled water for our bottles and that's what we drank, no need for iodine pills which taste nasty. I also brought along a can of powdered gatorade which helped me drink more as I don't tend to drink enough water.
    A few power bars or power gels wouldn't hurt.

    Related to:
    • Camping
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • fishandchips's Profile Photo

    Gear for Kilimanjaro

    by fishandchips Updated May 5, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    All geared up for the summit.
    1 more image

    Luggage and bags: You will need two bags - one main pack (carried by a porter) and a day bag big enough to hold your wet weather gear, camera, nibbles and water. I had a 22 litre day bag and this was fine. Remember, the bigger the bag the more gear you may end up stuffing in it!

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Starting from the bottom - as you are walking for several days your boots and socks are your most important items. I had full grain leather boots with 3 pair of thick marino socks plus cotton socks for the summit day (to give 2 layers and help draw the sweat away from my feet). My jacket was a Marmot nano - water and wind proof shell and my pants were cheap shower proof pants. I carried 2 base layer fine marino tee shirts (MacPac), long sleeve polyprop shirts and long johns, trekking pants, fleece jacket and long sleeve cotton top. These got swapped around then all worn together on the last day. I also carried 2 pair of gloves and wore both of these on summit day. For my head I had a light weight balaclava and a thick beenie.

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: I had a small bag of stuff and included drugs for the trots (!!), diamox for altitude and headache pills. I also had toothpaste and brush plus a couple of rolls of toilet paper - whatever you do don't forget to bring some toilet paper. Your guide team should have some to share with you but don't just rely on them!!

    Photo Equipment: I carried a digital camera with an okay zoom that took AA batteries. The cold on the summit sucks out the power so I carried plenty of spares. You'll not have many recharge options unless you have a fancy solar charger or you carry spare camera batteries (which are not too cheap!).

    Camping/Beach/Outdoor Gear: As I also did a safari, my sleeping bag was only rated at 0 degrees celcius so I was comfortable in the hot and cold. I carried a couple of liners - 1 silk and 1 thermal and was never cold. Being in huts this was not an issue however if you are in tents then I'd suggest a warmer sleeping bag as it can get very cold at night (was very cold at the Kibo site).

    Miscellaneous: I had walking poles with me and these were seen as compulsory by our guides. Other in my group were made to hire poles for $US10 for the week. A wide brimmed hat is handy (esp if you are taking Maleria tabs that make you sun sensitive) and sunglasses are essential.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Backpacking

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  • fishandchips's Profile Photo

    Day bag kit

    by fishandchips Updated May 5, 2012

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    Osprey Talon 22 with 2 litre bladder
    1 more image

    Luggage and bags: Your day bag will be what gets the most use up Kili so it pays to get a good one. I had an Osprey 22 litre bag with plenty of pockets which worked really well. Don't go overboard and buy a bag that's too big. It's too easy to fill it up and carry a lot more weight than you need to - especially on summit day! Remember that you'll also be carrying water and given that 1 litre = 1 kilogram your weight can add up rather quickly.

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Always carry rain proof jacket and pants plus a polyprop or similar thermal top (I had a couple of MacPac Merino tops). I also had a light weight balaclava just in case it got a bit cold and polyprop gloves. I wore full grain leather boots - more expensive than some others but they keep out the dust and cold and were very durable. Never undervalue socks!! You are best to have good quality socks as a poor pair can leave your feet in bad shape and since you are walking.....

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: One of the most important items for your comfort is toilet paper! Don't under value it. I also had a small pack of wet wipes (with a larger pack in my main gear bag) and sundry items such a band aids and sunscreen. Note that if you're taking anti Maleria pills you'll need extra sunscreen.

    Photo Equipment: Always carry your camera! Rather obvious really. Some in our group had 2 cameras just in case. Extra batteries are an asset here as well. On summit night it can be extremely cold and this sucks the life out of your batteries so keep spare in a warm place or wrapped up really well - don't want to get to the top and have no juice for a photo.

    Miscellaneous: I had a chap stick (for lips) and used it quite a bit - especially when the wind picked up and blasted the dust at us. I wore a wide brimmed hat the whole time - looked a bit silly but being on the doxy malaria tabs it kept the sun off my now very sun sensitive face and neck. I also carried a roll of tape to help with any running repairs I might need.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing

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  • hayward68's Profile Photo

    More packing!!!

    by hayward68 Written Sep 26, 2011
    Sorting the bags for the porters to carry

    Luggage and bags: Plastic bags to wrap your clothes in inside your bag as if it rains and your bag gets wet, so do your clothes. I had plastic travel cubes which kept my clothes sorted and dry.

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Leg gaiters to keep the dirt and rocks out of your hiking boots.
    A balaclava to keep your face warm on your summit attempt.
    A headlamp and extra batteries for it.

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Diamox for altitude sickness, you can choose to take this or not. I decided to take it and started taking it the first morning of our trek.
    Your guide should have a first aid kit but you might want to bring one of your own.
    Headache pills to deal with headaches but watch in case in turns bad, altitude sickness is something you don't want to have.
    Anti-Diarrhea meds because you just never know!

    Photo Equipment: Bring along some lens wipes if you can because your camera can get rather dirty on the trek, also can get wet if it rains, we experienced a thunderstorm on the trail.

    Camping/Beach/Outdoor Gear: I brought along my multi-tool, you never know when you'll need it. I cut my hair, sliced mangoes and gutted a fish while on my trip.

    Related to:
    • Camping
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Geisha_Girl's Profile Photo

    You can't be TOO prepared

    by Geisha_Girl Updated Dec 17, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Gaiters and Boots - Fashionable and Functional!
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    Luggage and bags: A large duffel or backpack about 3000 cu. inch pack should be big enough to carry all your gear. The porters on your trek will be carrying your bag up the mountain, but keep in mind that there are now weight restrictions and a maximum amount that each porter is allowed to carry. Be sure your bag is waterproof as it really takes a beating on the mountain through the extreme changes in climate. If your bag is not waterproof, it's a good idea to wrap all of the enclosed items in plastic bags. Our guide carried extras, and they totally saved my gear from getting soaking wet on the trek.

    It's also necessary to take a smaller daypack that you'll keep with you throughout the hike. The porters will be hours ahead of you to set up camp before you arrive, so keep all the necessities with you in your daypack (first aid kit, camera, water, gloves, protein bars, etc....)

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Hiking Boots - A very sturdy pair of boots are key and a life-saving accessory. If you plan on buying a new pair prior to the hike, be sure they are broken-in and stretched out. Make sure it's roomy enough for at least two pairs of woolen socks. Even slightly small boots can cause toes to get badly bruised when descending. (If blisters form, you should immediately cover the area with zinc oxide tape, moleskin, or gel tape). Some recommended hiking boot brands: Lowa, Merrell

    Hiking Socks - Another key to a happy hike! Make sure the socks work with you boots. Not too thick because your feet could likely swell on a day's hike, but don't have them too thin either or your toes can freeze!

    Running shoes or trainers - Useful to wear around camp to give your feet a rest from your boots.

    Gaiters - One of my favorite accessories. It's all you need to keep rocks out of your shoes and your boots dry. You can slush through water and the thickest mud, but with the gaiters on, no problem.

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Sunscreen - Can't stress enough the importance of slathering on the SPF while on Kili. The sun is merciless up there, especially on the summit. I carried a waterproof, sweatproof SPF 50 and I'm sure without it, I would've been grilled well-done up there.

    Lip Balm - Protect those luscious lips!! Kiehl's has a fantastic lip balm that soothes and protects dry chapped lips.

    Multi-vitamins - Don't slack on the vitamins. I am a true believer in the GNC "Mega Woman" brand and with as much traveling that I do, 2 a day have strengthened my immune system.

    Diamox - Consult your physician for this prescription. Some climbers steer clear of the diamox, but after my trial run on White Mountain this past summer and experiencing the adverse affects of high altitude, I decided to try out the diamox on Kili. No headaches, no nausea, and no feeling lethargic. The only side effect was a little tingle in my fingers and toes....and the relentless need to "mark my territory" along the trail !

    Camping/Beach/Outdoor Gear: Sleeping Bag - This should be Expedition Quality to at least 10 degrees farenheit or below. I personally prefer the goose down bags and chose the 0 degree bag. The nights at camp are below freezing so having the right bag is so important. You can also purchase an additional sleeping bag liner that will add up to 15 degrees more warmth in your bag. Marmot and Mountain Hardware make very high quality sleeping bags and would be my recommended choice (they equip the Everest expeditions). I was sleeping an average of 8-10 hours per night while up on the mountain (that's more sleep than I ever get at home!) and I attribute that comfortable uninterrupted sleep to my warm sleeping bag. It's worth the investment!

    Self Inflating Pad - Thermarest makes a very good pad that's lightweight and can pack easily. I had the 2 inch pad and keeping that in between your body and the ass-biting cold ground was essential.

    Miscellaneous: Baseball cap or other sun hat - One with a good visor to shade the nose and eyes. There are days during the hike when the sun scorches, so a brimmed hat will help protect you from the harsh rays.

    Down Jacket - Medium to heavy weight with a hood is good. You don't necessarily need to wear this during the day hikes, but on summit night the down jacket is a must.

    Long Underwear - NO COTTON. A synthetic material that dries fast is good to have. You will be doing lots of layering, so the thinner the better.

    Rain Poncho or waterproof pants and jacket - A Must Have on the mountain. The rain poncho I bought from REI (www.rei.com) was a lifesaver and kept me dry and warm from top to bottom. It's thin enough to roll up into your daypack and you can pop it in and out when needed. The weather on Kili is quite unpredictable so you just never know when the next downpour could take place.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • oldun's Profile Photo

    Travel light

    by oldun Written Apr 6, 2006

    Luggage and bags: We had one back pack each (which was carried for us) and each took a day pack

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Good walking boots. General hiking gear. change of clothes/trainers for the camp. We took a lot of gear that we were not too bothered about taking back and left it for the team to have. Don't take too much (not much point in having a change of hiking outwear every day - it is just more for the team to carry) you can leave unneccesary gear at your hotel,

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Soap, toothbrush, towel, babywipes. You won't need shampoo - all the water is collected from streams or carried. The babywipes make a good bath!
    Toilet Paper. Water purification tablets.

    Photo Equipment: Good photo equipment. Take a spare battery for digitial cameras/flashes etc and keep them in a warm place when not used (I wrapped mine in an old sock and kept in an inside pocket. You will not want a dead battery at the top of the mountain!

    Camping/Beach/Outdoor Gear: You will need a fleece/jacket to start the each day (not too heavy that can be carried when you get warmer). The top can get to -18 (on our day) do take thermals and good clothes for that last day.

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  • df53's Profile Photo

    What (and what not) to wear...

    by df53 Updated Sep 12, 2005

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    Me at the summit, lots of layers!
    3 more images

    Luggage and bags: 1 big one with the majority of your stuff, we were restricted to 15kgs which should be more than enough.
    1 day pack (mine was 20 ltrs) with water, camera, waterproofs. Hint: keep it light!!!

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: sturdy walking boots for during the day, although you are going to slowly to risk blisters believe it or not.
    lighter shoes at night for around camp/in the bunk house/tent.
    you should ideally have a pair of liner socks then thicker outer socks. this is most imprtant for summit night as it will be pretty damn cold.
    decent hat and gloves for summit night will also be good.
    Think layers: a dry-fit base layer, next a micro fleece, then (ideally) a down jacket although I simply had a thicker fleece but it was a bit bulky.
    Gaiters for summit night will keep the loose stones/scree out of your boots.

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Copious amounts of anti-diorhea tablets, painkillers and loo roll!!
    No real shower facilities so you might want to use large size wet wipes instead.
    Dont even think about shaving guys!
    You can bring iodine tablets to purify water but the bottled stuff is fine.
    Energy bars, lucozade tablets, dried fruit. anything to give you that extra push when you need it. Would highly recommend the lcozade gel shots for an immediate burst of energy.

    Photo Equipment: I bought a digital camera before going (the mju 300) and it was great. also survived the cold on the summit

    Camping/Beach/Outdoor Gear: WALKING POLES: these take the strain of your legs and make more use of your arms, anything you can do to conserve energy at the HEAD TORCH: great for around camp at night and summit night.
    PLATYPUS: much handier than a water bottle although the tubing will freeze on summit night.

    Miscellaneous: Kit is always a difficult one. Any queries just drop me a line and I can give you more detailed hints on what to bring and what to leave out.
    I have included a selection of pics of me at different points so you can get an idea of what i was wearing.

    Related to:
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Backpacking

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  • Bonobo2005's Profile Photo

    CLOTHES ON KILI

    by Bonobo2005 Updated Jan 12, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Camping/Beach/Outdoor Gear: A reply on a question regarding clothes

    As for clothing, all depends on the weather of course. Some have lots of snow
    and strong winds, where I had perfect clear weater on the summitnight. I went in
    the same period as you, it should be ok since the rains are over. But you need
    to be prepared for the worst and can decide later if you wear it or not. Porters
    carry your stuff so better bring too much. Quite good stuff can be rented also
    in Moshi for the trek only.

    Miscellaneous: During the summit night I was wearing -if I remember well- thermo-underpant
    (recommended) and common trekkingpants, 2 pairs of woolen socks and layers of
    thermo shirt / shirt / fleece + thick windproof jacket (that I rented in Moshi).
    Also a hat (covering ears) and scarf. Also bring or rent snow googles, just in
    case. For gloves, I had common type; it was "only" minus 10 degrees and no wind,
    so just fine.

    On the other days - yes if the sun was out t-shirt was fine even to Barafu Hut
    (4500m), but with the clouds wind proof fleece was needed. Also bring or rent
    decent raingear especially for first day rainforrest.

    I think that's it, hope you will get some ideas.

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  • df53's Profile Photo

    REnting walking gear

    by df53 Written Nov 8, 2004

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    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Most people prefer to use their own poles, waterproofs, sleeping bags etc. But there was a great place next to where I was staying if you need to rent. A woman called Gladys runs a place called African Art shop and Equipment Hire. Its on the main road from Moshi to Marangu Gate. I didnt have to rent anything but others in the Group did and they said the gear was in very good condition and not too expensive.

    Related to:
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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing

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  • Gard's Profile Photo

    Bring walking poles

    by Gard Written Feb 16, 2004

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    Walking with my poles

    Miscellaneous: I don’t use this when I walk here in Norway but it was really nice to have these “helpers” on the Kilimanjaro. If you haven’t used walking poles before try them out before you get to the mountain. I also recommend bringing a thin pair of gloves. Your hands will be out of your pockets most of the day if you are using poles. The gloves will keep your hands warm and protect them from the sun.

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    Water bottles

    by Gard Written Feb 16, 2004

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    My platypus water bottle

    Luggage and bags: It is important to drink lots of water while you are on the mountain to prevent altitude problems. I had a 2 liter Platypus water “tank” and a 1 liter aluminum bottle (Laken) that I used on a daily basis. I also brought along a little backpack that I could wear under my jacket on the summit night. This backpack contained the Platypus water “tank” and kept it from freezing. We all had these Platypus bags by the way and we all agreed that it is a great product when you go hiking.

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    Different “Medicines”

    by Gard Written Feb 16, 2004

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    Luggage and bags: Mosquito spray
    Not very useful on the mountain itself. But when you get back down again it is useful to have some “protection” against the blood suckers :-) I used Autan.

    Malaria pills
    Once you are on the mountain you are out of range of the malaria mosquito. But remember you are normally in the danger zone before you start trekking and after you are done. I went for Malarone which is the “new” pill, not that many side effects and it is ridiculous expensive. I paid about 100 US dollars for 24 pills.

    Headache pills
    If you live at sea level like me there is a chance that you can experience some altitude problems. I brought along some paracet pills to kill head aches.

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Lemsip
    I also brought along some Lemsip Cold + Flu which turned out to be quite smart. When we started walking I did start developing a cold or something like that and it was nice to have this medicine at hand.

    Strepsils
    Same as above…as I developed my cold it was nice to have something to suck on at night to prevent me from coughing and keeping my tent mate awake.

    Diamox
    Diamox can be used to prevent altitude sickness. I brought along 100 pills (250 mg each). I shared this with the other members in the party. Ready more in the diary about our experience with the Diamox.

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Water purification pills
    I brought along some Micropur by Katadyn but I never did use them. All the water that we drank was boiled so it was clean enough.

    Sun cream
    The equatorial sun is extremely strong at least for a fair skinned Norwegian like me. And remember that there are different qualities of creams…I went for a brand called Vichy with SPF 30. And don’t forget to have something to protect your lips as well.

    Camping/Beach/Outdoor Gear: Ear plugs
    It was said that it was useful to bring this along since porters can be pretty loud at night. I didn’t really have a problem with this and I didn’t use them.

    Toilet paper
    Very useful to bring along :-) On the different camp sites there are something that resembles squatting toilets and on some lunch stops you can also find these toilets. We were also offered toilet paper by our tour guide Marangu hotel on the mountain.

    Wet wipes
    I’m not going to go into details on this…but when you stay in a tent for about a week it is nice to be possible to clean yourself a little bit with wet wipes.

    Miscellaneous: Nose spray
    It is important to not have a blocked nose when you are walking. I brought along the nose spray just in case.

    Sports tape/Compeed
    An easy way to avoid blisters. We would tape our heels and big toes to avoid any problems. But I did bring some Compeed just as a backup but I didn’t use it.

    Antibac
    It is not always possible to wash yourself after you have been to the toilet. Due to this I brought along a liquid that we used on our hands to kill all the germs.

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  • Gard's Profile Photo

    Different “Medicines”

    by Gard Written Feb 16, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Luggage and bags: Mosquito spray
    Not very useful on the mountain itself. But when you get back down again it is useful to have some “protection” against the blood suckers :-) I used Autan.

    Malaria pills
    Once you are on the mountain you are out of range of the malaria mosquito. But remember you are normally in the danger zone before you start trekking and after you are done. I went for Malarone which is the “new” pill, not that many side effects and it is ridiculous expensive. I paid about 100 US dollars for 24 pills.

    Headache pills
    If you live at sea level like me there is a chance that you can experience some altitude problems. I brought along some paracet pills to kill head aches.

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Lemsip
    I also brought along some Lemsip Cold + Flu which turned out to be quite smart. When we started walking I did start developing a cold or something like that and it was nice to have this medicine at hand.

    Strepsils
    Same as above…as I developed my cold it was nice to have something to suck on at night to prevent me from coughing and keeping my tent mate awake.

    Diamox
    Diamox can be used to prevent altitude sickness. I brought along 100 pills (250 mg each). I shared this with the other members in the party. Ready more in the diary about our experience with the Diamox.

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Water purification pills
    I brought along some Micropur by Katadyn but I never did use them. All the water that we drank was boiled so it was clean enough.

    Sun cream
    The equatorial sun is extremely strong at least for a fair skinned Norwegian like me. And remember that there are different qualities of creams…I went for a brand called Vichy with SPF 30. And don’t forget to have something to protect your lips as well.

    Camping/Beach/Outdoor Gear: Ear plugs
    It was said that it was useful to bring this along since porters can be pretty loud at night. I didn’t really have a problem with this and I didn’t use them.

    Toilet paper
    Very useful to bring along :-) On the different camp sites there are something that resembles squatting toilets and on some lunch stops you can also find these toilets. We were also offered toilet paper by our tour guide Marangu hotel on the mountain.

    Wet wipes
    I’m not going to go into details on this…but when you stay in a tent for about a week it is nice to be possible to clean yourself a little bit with wet wipes.

    Miscellaneous: Nose spray
    It is important to not have a blocked nose when you are walking. I brought along the nose spray just in case.

    Sports tape/Compeed
    An easy way to avoid blisters. We would tape our heels and big toes to avoid any problems. But I did bring some Compeed just as a backup but I didn’t use it.

    Antibac
    It is not always possible to wash yourself after you have been to the toilet. Due to this I brought along a liquid that we used on our hands to kill all the germs.

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    Sleeping bag

    by Gard Written Feb 16, 2004

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    Ajungilak sleeping bag

    Luggage and bags: I bought a new sleeping bag in connection with my trip because I didn’t want to freeze :-) I bought a bag of the Norwegian brand Ajungilak (www.ajungilak.no/) and it is called Kompakt 2000 and has a comfort temperature down to -10 degrees Celsius. I also bought a silk inner bag of the same brand to keep my bag a bit clean and to make it even warmer. And it worked out pretty good…I didn’t freeze while I was on the trip. I also brought along a Ajungilak pillow..it was almost like being at home :-)

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    Head lamp

    by Gard Updated Feb 16, 2004

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    Petzl lamp

    Camping/Beach/Outdoor Gear: I borrowed a Petzl (www.petzl.com) head lamp from a friend of mine and it was great. It made going to the toilet, brushing my teeth, writing in my journal etc so much easier. This was the kind were you can have the battery pack in the pocket to keep them warm and I didn’t have any problems shining bright on the summit night. Don’t leave home without it :-) I also brought along a Maglite but I never used it. Don’t forget to bring along extra batteries.

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