Ngorongoro Things to Do

  • Elephants
    Elephants
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  • Flamingos
    Flamingos
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  • Flamingos
    Flamingos
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Most Recent Things to Do in Ngorongoro

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    Tour the Crater

    by Geisha_Girl Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Nice ride!

    Our group of volunteers all decided to do a safari tour together just 3 days prior to the weekend. We knew we were just hitting the peak safari season in Tanzania, so we figured our chances of booking a decent deal was slim.

    Luckily, I had come across a brochure at our homebase that a previous volunteer had left behind. I figured I'd call them and find out what the chances were of accommodating 13 people on a safari in just 3 days.

    It took a little bit of negotiating but we managed to score a very GOOD deal with a company called "Ranger Safari."

    For a 2-night stay in a 5 star lodge, a full day tour of the Ngorongoro Crater (and a 1/2 day tour of Lake Manyara), all meals, transportation in a Range Rover, a guide, and pick up from our home in Moshi to the safari destinations........our deal came out to $335 USD. We thought that was such a bargain, considering we only had a few days' notice, and most of the prices we saw online previously for these types of excursions were well into the $500 range.

    We were very pleased with the deal, and hoped we hooked up with a legitimate company.

    When they arrived in these luxury range rovers to our home base to pick us all up......that was a nice start.

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  • Penelope4's Profile Photo

    Zebras - my favourite animals!

    by Penelope4 Updated Feb 27, 2010

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    Do you think you can differentiate zebras from one another? I tried but I could not. Maybe because I use the stripes as point of comparison. Next time, I will try to use height and size to distinguish them from one another.

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    Hyaenas - where lions are, they are there too.

    by Penelope4 Updated Feb 27, 2010

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    If you think the hyaenas can just join the lion when the latter is having a meal, think again. What happens is, the hyaenas gather together and wait until the lion has had enough and then they eat the left over.

    Hyaenas look like something between tiger and hippo to me. But it's my opinion okay.

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    Lesser Masked Weaver - I so like them

    by Penelope4 Updated Feb 27, 2010

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    So we were having lunch at the picnic ground...the hippos were just loving the water and won't show themselves up. I was about to become impatient and then came these yellowish birds. SLLiew recognized this bird as Lesser Masked Weaver.

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    Wildebeest - so many of them

    by Penelope4 Updated Feb 11, 2010

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    They look so kind. Lions eat them. I actually saw a fresh kill and on our way back from the game-drive I saw its remains. Apparently, the lion comes back to eat some more of the flesh and when it has enough, the hyaenas finish the wildebeest totally.

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  • fishandchips's Profile Photo

    Pumba

    by fishandchips Written Nov 13, 2009

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    The diminuative worthog is alive and well in the crater and can be seen often. With its small tusks and quick stepping it is one of the more interesting animals to view. Pumba lives in the longer grass and tries to blend in and out of the notice of the hungry predators.

    Related to:
    • Safari

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  • fishandchips's Profile Photo

    See the heartbeat of East Africa

    by fishandchips Updated Nov 7, 2009

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    Lone Wildebeest

    The movement of the Wildebeest is the heartbeat of the Serengeti and surrounds. Each migration includes the movement of the Wildebeests predators as they follow their food supply. From the Serengeti to the Maasai Mara over 1.4 million wildebeest migrate in a clockwise fashion over 1,800 miles each year in search of rain ripened grass.

    The animals appear to stand around in haphazard groups then move in a long line to their next destination. It's as though there is an 'overmind' at work as the animals appear to act as one - weird I know!

    Related to:
    • Safari

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  • fishandchips's Profile Photo

    Go on a Game Drive

    by fishandchips Written Nov 7, 2009

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    All set!
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    The only way to see animals in the crater is via Jeep. Most are purpose built with open tops so that you can stand and take your photos. Drives start from your camp site and go down into the crater via the guard post at the entrance.

    As the crater is reputed to have over 30,000 large animals (including black rhino) there is lots to see. Animals are free to leave or enter the Crater but most of them stay because of the plentiful water and food available on the crater floor throughout the year. This means that you should always have something to photograph no matter when you visit.

    Time in the crater is limited by law and all vehicles must be out by 6pm with a maximum of 8 hours in the crater.

    Related to:
    • Safari

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  • fishandchips's Profile Photo

    Big Bird

    by fishandchips Written Nov 7, 2009

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    Male Ostrich

    The Ostrich is the largest living bird in the world with only the extinct Giant Moa (up to 3.7M) and Elephant Bird (up to 3M) taller. Famed for many things, including being Zola Buds training buddy, the Ostrich can be seen running about the Crater area in search of a quick meal (lol). The Ostrich is part of the same family of birds as NZ's own Kiwi (ratites). The male is black and white and the female is brown.

    Related to:
    • Birdwatching
    • Safari

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  • fishandchips's Profile Photo

    Olduvai Gorge

    by fishandchips Written Nov 7, 2009

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    Olduvai Gorge
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    Not part of the Crater but in the Ngorongoro Conservation area, Olduvai Gorge is a place to visit and is situated in the plains area. The gorge is named after the Maasai word for the wild sisal plant you see growing around the gorge, called Oldupai. The story goes that the gorge is called Olduvai after early white visitors didn't quite understand what local Maasai called the area. The Museum is marked as Oldupai!

    The gorge is famous for being one of the most important prehistoric sites in the world. It is considered the seat of humanity after the discovery of the earliest known specimens of the human genus, Homo habilis as well as early homonids, Paranthropus boisei. Excavation work here was pioneered by Mary and Louis Leakey in the 1950s and is continued today by their family. You can see some copies of what was found plus other info in the small Olduvai musuem.

    Incidently, you can also get Cellular coverage here as the gorge has its own Cell site!

    Related to:
    • Safari
    • Eco-Tourism

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  • fishandchips's Profile Photo

    Elephant Watching

    by fishandchips Written Nov 7, 2009

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    Crossing Paths
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    Apparently all Elephants in the Crater are male due to the difficulty of walking up and down the steep sides! The Elephants we saw on our drive were all rather large with one massive beast having a meeting with an elderly male Lion - fantastic stuff!!

    Related to:
    • Safari

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  • fishandchips's Profile Photo

    Spot a Lion in the grass

    by fishandchips Written Nov 7, 2009

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    Looking for Lunch?
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    As with other places like the Serengeti and Maasai Mara, the Ngorongoro Crater has quite a few lions. During the daylight hours they are either hunting, eating or sleeping and can normally be found quietly hiding in the long grass that cover a lot of the Crater's floor.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Safari

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  • easterntrekker's Profile Photo

    The Black Rhino

    by easterntrekker Written Oct 14, 2009

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    The highlight for us was seeing the endangered black Rhino. They were quite far off but we had a pretty good look with binoculars. They are the reason many come to the crater. At the beginning of the 20th century their numbers in Africa were estimated to be in the hundreds of thousands. The Black Rhinoceros has been pushed to the brink of extinction by illegal poaching for their horn and by loss of habitat. The horn is used in tradional Chinese medicine and is said by herbalists to be able to revive comatose patients, cure fevers, and aid male sexual stamina and fertility. The purported effectiveness of the use of rhino horn in treating any illness has not been confirmed by medical science. In the Ngorongora Crater they are said to number not more than 20 and park rangers heavily guard them.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Seniors
    • Safari

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  • easterntrekker's Profile Photo

    During the Drought

    by easterntrekker Written Oct 14, 2009

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    We then drove for quite a while without seeing much of anything. This surprised us as we wrongly assumed animals would always be here in large numbers, but the crater is huge and during the time of drought the animals rest out of the hot sun. When we reach a jungle area we spot a spectacular Ayres Hawk Eagle. He’s perched on a small branch above a stream, an ideal location for fishing. We also see many Grey Crowned Crane. They are quite comical looking with bright blue eyes and fuzzy heads.

    Related to:
    • Safari
    • Seniors
    • Eco-Tourism

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  • easterntrekker's Profile Photo

    Wildebeest!!

    by easterntrekker Written Oct 14, 2009

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    As soon as we arrive in the crater we see our very first wildebeest. We took numerous pictures ,only to see huge herds a short while later. Also there were herds of zebra. We took quite a while trying to catch them in just the right position. Their stripes fascinate me. So exotic.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Seniors
    • Safari

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Ngorongoro Things to Do

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