Wassu Things to Do

  • gambia wassu river gambia
    gambia wassu river gambia
    by johnsakura
  • Village
    Village
    by grets
  • Baobab trees
    Baobab trees
    by grets

Best Rated Things to Do in Wassu

  • johnsakura's Profile Photo

    Stone circles

    by johnsakura Written May 28, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    wassu stone circles gambia

    Wassu is just the place of thiese stone circles, 20km northwest of Janjanbureh aka Georgetown.
    This place is quite interesting and you'll feel like you're actually almost in the begining of man kind here...but you're not, not at all, these rocks seems to be 750AD, so, quite recent I should say.
    The surrounding landscape is also very nice which give you something odd to a normal westerner's eye.
    The road is made of dirt in red colour, very strong one. I've never saw such a strong red on dirt and of course roads made of that, or, no roads i mean. there are no roads, just dirt tracks.

    Was this review helpful?

  • johnsakura's Profile Photo

    Other close stone circles

    by johnsakura Written May 28, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    gambia wassu river gambia

    It seems to exists more stone monuments besides Wassu in the region ofthe North Bank. I didnt see them but I have the info you can maybe use. On the road to Niani Maru you have stones on each side of the road. At Njai Kunda you have the largest stones of them all, up to ten tonnes. At Kerr Batch you have nine circles of pillars, including an odd V-shaped one.

    Was this review helpful?

  • johnsakura's Profile Photo

    More stones

    by johnsakura Updated May 29, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    gambia wassu river gambia

    It seems that no one near by of the locals will know to explaine you the story of those stones, they will only tell you it looks good to leave stones up like that. In the Wassu stone circles you have at least 10 laterite pillars erected arround a tree.

    Was this review helpful?

  • grets's Profile Photo

    Stone circle

    by grets Written Jan 26, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Wassu stone circles

    The circles are believed by many to be burial sites, a theory which was enforced with the discovery of early skeltons in the centre of some of the circles, as well as tools and pottery, items which made have been left with the dead to help them on their journey into the afterlife.

    There is said to be a curse on anyone who is found disturbing this site, which is not a bad bit of superstition to have in place. In 1931, an arcaeologist and his expedition leader, both died mysetriously following excavations at this site.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • grets's Profile Photo

    Village

    by grets Written Jan 26, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Village

    Not far from Wassu, we visited a traditional village. The houses are made from mud and the people are very poor by our standards, with no running water or electricity. It was interesting to see how they live in this area.

    Was this review helpful?

  • grets's Profile Photo

    Baobab trees

    by grets Written Jan 26, 2005

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Baobab trees

    Known as the 'upside down' tree because its bare branches look like roots jetting out into the sky, the baobab tree dominates the landscape in this reagion. A local tale tells that devil himself uprooted the tree and placed it upside down. The baobab is also believed to have magical powers because of its ability to store water in the huge trunk. Other names for the tree includes 'monkey bread tree' from the pulpy nature of the large yellow fruits.

    Superstition abounds around the baobab tree, and most villages have at least one specimen. There are few trees around with so many uses: The fruit is made into a drink, musical instrumets are fashioned from the bark, the fragrant white flowers are used as decoration during festivals. Leaves are eaten either frsh or dried. Dried leaves are powedered and used for medicinal purposes, said to cure rheumatism and inflammations. The bark is used to help cure malaria, the pulp is a remedy for circulatory ailments, the seeds are manufactured into soap and fertiliser. The gourd-like shells are fashioned into containers, bark can be woven into rope and cloth as well as being used as packing paper. The hollow trunks have been used as shelter over the centuries, whilst any dead trees are utilised as firewood or made into boats. Baobab trees have long been popular places for burials. Unlike most trees, the baobab does not increase in height as it gets older, it actually gets shorter whilst the girth increases, just like humans.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Wassu

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

116 travelers online now

Comments

Wassu Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Wassu things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Wassu sightseeing.

View all Wassu hotels