Fun things to do in Africa

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Africa

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    RETURN GLASS BOTTLES

    by DAO Written Jun 27, 2015


    Across virtually all of Africa there is a deposit, paid by the shop or bar owner, on every glass bottle of drink. In some places they may even refuse to sell you soda in a bottle if they do not know you! That’s because they are worried you will leave with their bottle. Just assure them that you will drink it right away and hand the bottle back. So take care with the bottles and if you get some from the grocery store (no deposit), please leave them for the hotel staff.

    If you break a bottle, please offer few cents or pence to cover the cost.

    Namibia Ethiopia Rwanda Togo Madagascar
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    Visiting Morocco

    by angiebabe Updated Jun 25, 2015

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    What about choosing Morocco? - I am rather biased but it is Africa

    - has some very beautiful sights and amazing diversity of landscapes: mountains, desert, oases, lakes, miles of plains that can be covered in flowers in springtime, amazing mudbrick palace and fortified village complexes

    - no vaccinations needed

    - pretty safe and stable particularly out of all the Arabic/islamic countries

    - people culturally and traditionally love children/babies there and are generally hospitable

    - theres plenty to see there of a wide range of sights, culture and historic periods or angles (Jewish, Berber, sub-saharan, Arabic, roman, Portugeuse, French, Spanish) with a range of languages - particularly with those in tourism

    - there are some great places for walking, hiking, cycling, climbing - not particularly expensive, plenty of choice for whatever levels of comfort you want and great for driving around

    Theres an excellent range of landscapes - I love the diversity there so much - coast and beaches, mountains, desert, cities and Imperial cities, berber villages

    Moroccan food is great!

    If you want to add a bit more you could start off in Andalucian Spain for a week or so - see the Moorish connection there and then easy trip over the straits of Gibraltar to Morocco.

    Ive travelled frequently to MOrocco over the past 9 years driving around many routes and have a pretty good range of accommodations that I have connections with of varying levels around most of the country and totally find it a fascinating but still quite relaxing place to be , especially with my camera.

    Marrakech airport
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    Check out excellent website www.africa-guide.com

    by angiebabe Updated Jun 25, 2015

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    Excellent website with stacks happening - forums, photo library, travelogues with many longterm journals of travels around Africa being written - lots to look at before any trip to Africa, record stuff while youre there and for after the event of course!
    The photo library is particularly good.

    In addition to all that you can get in and share here on VT of course!

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    VICTORIA FALLS === for those...

    by kenHuocj Updated Apr 26, 2015

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    VICTORIA FALLS === for those arriving by foot, including David Livingstone , many many years ago, ‘Mosi-oa-Tunya’ - ‘the Smoke that Thunders’ must have been quite an experience !!!
    It's one of Nature's Wonders on Planet Earth. Next time, i visit, i MUST & SHALL travel over the area in a Balloon.

    This was part of Cecil John Rhodes dream of Cape to Cairo railway, which never materialised, but his Rhodes Scholarship ensures that his legacy survives, despite the recent controversy at Cape Town University where his statue was removed at the instigation of Students,

    to reminisce, my first visit was in 1959 with Mom Dad and Sisiter, then again with Jennifer and Dad, , a group of us chartered a Douglas Dak - DC# for a long weekend, wish we took a movie or had the convenience of todays digital world, i was allowed the joy of watching the landing sitting behind the pilot, the wonders of Nature

    The world of Somerset Maughan and Ernest Hemmingway are associated with certain Hotels, the Grand Dame her is the Victoria Falls Hotel, the interactive MAP shows its state;y position adjoining it's newer neighbours the Kingdom Hotel one of Sol Kerner's stable and Ilala Lodge
    But for the landed and wishing to be served and guided , try the Africa Untamed package - a Sari and more in a nutshell.

    Vic Falls Info Centre (thanks to onestep4ward.com)
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    DEALING WITH LANGUAGE BARRIER

    by inamahoro Updated Mar 24, 2015

    Traveling to a foreign country is exciting and immersing oneself in a different culture is something that is extremely rewarding, and for some travelers, a once in a lifetime opportunity. After arriving in a different country, the first thing you will come into contact with is the language. Communication in a foreign country is vital, and a little understanding of the language will enhance your staying experience in a chosen destination.

    Though it is mostly glamorous, traveling to a foreign country can be daunting if you do not know the language. Some people fear that they might get lost or be taken advantage of, while others do not want to deal with the frustration of trying to get around a new place without being able to accurately communicate. But not knowing the language should never be the reason of turning down the good opportunity to travel. There are plenty of things that you can do to prepare yourself for your trip and eliminate some of the language barrier between you and the people in your destination.

    Technology has provided us with an easy opportunity to communicate in languages that we do not know of. Before traveling, it is advisable to go through the internet or search and buy a book that teaches you common words and phrases in the native language of your destination. Learn some basic phrases, such as saying hello, thank you and how to ask for direction. When you have some understanding of the most important basics, you will be able to get around without a bulk of difficulties.

    Airports have the potential of being stressful, regardless if you are familiar with the destination or not. Immediately after disembarking from the airplane will most likely put one in front of a number of directional signs that in most cases are not well understandable. Making your way to baggage claim, exchanging currency, and locating the taxi terminal are all situations where language assistance is definitely needed. An interpreter, mostly a local, would lend their understanding of the language to direct you through the airport, eliminating stress. It is advisable to communicate to the interpreter/guide before travel so that they can be waiting for you upon arrival. This allows one to start their adventure in their destination full of energy and enthusiasm with the hope to have a fabulous trip.

    After long flights, we expect to get to our accommodation almost immediately after arrival. We also want to get to the destinations without getting lost and this contributes in making our vacation a memorable one. Being able to communicate to a taxi driver exactly where to go will deliver you in an efficient time frame, and having a local guide helping with the navigation also ensures you are arriving at the correct destination. In addition, anything you would like to know about the destination can be well explained by the local guide.

    In some foreign countries, food and commodities are most likely to be purchased at places where your native spoken language is not translated on the menu or on the catalogs in shopping outlets. Some countries are famous for outdoor markets and food stands, completely immersing you in a different and probably strange language and also the menu could be strange too depending on the extent one is willing to indulge themselves in the different culture. This can make ordering meals and drinks a challenge. Inquiring and knowing about what is in the delicacy you are about to eat, you will have the total confidence while enjoying the meal.

    The best part about visiting a foreign country is coming into contact with people and enjoying the company of the local community. Having the extra advantage of being able to communicate in their native language will allow you to experience in a high level, their way of life and their cultural and heritage practices. A local professional guide is able to perform consecutive translations, listening to several complete sentences and delivering a culturally right and confident response that both you and the person you are speaking are bound to understand.

    A professional guide is very vital when traveling to any destination not only for direction guidance but also for language assistance.

    Multilingual Guides Assisting Tourists Many Hotels have English Speaking staffs Relax, we've got you covered
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    Making the Distance

    by inamahoro Updated Mar 24, 2015

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    Ask many Africans how far apart are two given towns, and the reply will generally be put in terms of hours rather than distance. It is an unofficial way of thinking, but one worth adopting in this continent where in many situations; road conditions can be really unpredictable mostly depending on the climate.

    When planning a trip in any part of Africa, it is important to adopt a realistic time frame. Even on a well organized tour, it is common for the itinerary not to go as initially planned, for example, driving to a particular destination might end up occupying far more time than the time spent enjoying the sights at the destination. And you can not entirely blame tour operators for this, some natural factors combined with poor road infrastructure play a big role when it comes to time based delays. Potential clients often opt for an itinerary with more sights than a more leisurely one; this ensures that even if time dependent delays arise, they will end up enjoying most of the sights if not all.

    With an organized tour, one can at least be confident that the itinerary, however rushed, will be realistic. For independent travelers, it is more difficult to determine whether an itinerary that looks possible on a travel map will be possible that way on the ground, henceforth, it is advisable that one is flexible while on the ground and as much as the map will give some guidance, flexibility will allow one to enjoy their trip when they choose to base their judgments on the situation on the ground other than following the map up to the last detail that it includes.

    Poor road networks are not the only obstacles to covering distance quickly when one chooses to use public transport while on a trip. African public transport often works on a fill-up-and-go basis, and the process of accumulating passengers may well take longer than the physical journey. Before deciding to use public transport, a traveler should inquire about such things and then make a decision whether to use public transport or opt for private hired transport means which are easily available and varies from budget, luxury to VIP choices.

    Getting around Africa is not a slow process though conditions are highly variable from one road to the next and also from one country to another. Prospective travelers should research local conditions before committing to an itinerary, and bear in mind that the more one crams in, the more likely it is that the trip will be dominated by the tedious logistics of getting around.

    Up the Hills Sometimes Roads are open for 'Everyone'
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    GOD'S WINDOW & WONDER VIEW - SOUTH AFRICA

    by DAO Updated Aug 14, 2014

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    God's Window is a breathtaking viewpoint from a high escarpment looking down over 900 meters to the Lowveld below. The view is of a vast Eden-like area, hence its name. Parts of Kruger National Park and Mozambique can be seen in the distance. From the car park you walk up winding trails that at times look like you might fall off into the distance. The actual view site at the top is a Wild Nature Reserve. You can see waterfalls, rock formations, sheer cliffs and canyons. I watched a thunderstorm in one corner of the sky and brilliant sunshine over the rest of the area at the same time. The area seems impossibly large. You can even scramble onto rocks sticking out into space for an even more incredible view. Just be careful.

    Wonder View is nearby (2 km up the road), It offers the highest viewpoint of the area at 1730 meters. No climbing needed as the viewpoint is right next to the road.

    Would you like to see some more natural beauty? The Mpumalanga Region is full of natural wonders you can visit virtually. Please have a look at:

    DAO’s MPUMALANGA PAGE

    God's Window
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    THE PANORAMA ROUTE - SOUTH AFRICA (MPUMALANGA)

    by DAO Updated Aug 14, 2014

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    The Panorama is a route that will take a driver through some of the most stunning views of the natural wonders of South Africa. It stretches from Sabie, through Graskop on to the Blyde River Canyon. Along the way you can see some of the hidden gems of Mpumalanga including: The Pinnacle, Gods Window, Bourkes Luck Potholes, 3 Rondavels and plenty of waterfalls along your drive. Many South Africans and many Tourists never visit these extraordinary sites for different reasons. If you do go to South Africa, make sure you include the Panorama!

    The Official Route is:


    TOWNS

    Blydepoort
    Graskop
    Hazyview
    Hoedspruit
    Lydenburg
    Ohrigstad
    Pilgrim's Rest
    Sabie
    White River

    ACTIVITIES

    Fly Fishing
    Hiking
    Adventure Sport
    Gold Panning
    Rafting Sightseeing
    Game Viewing
    Hot Air Ballooning

    Amazingly this can all be seen in 1 day, if you get up early!

    Bourkes Luck Potholes Blyde River Valley 3 Rondavels God's Window The Pinnacle
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    KASUBI ROYAL TOMBS-UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE SITE

    by DAO Updated Aug 4, 2014

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    The tombs of the Buganda Kings are here on Kasubi Hill in Kampala, Uganda. The Buganda people are the largest ethnic group in Uganda. Huge traditional reed and bark-cloth buildings form an enclosure that has been a royal palace for the (Kabakas) since 1881. Four royal tombs now lie within the Muzibu Azaala Mpanga (main building) circular and domed building. Each King has pictures, weapons, medals and even a stuffed pet leopard adorning their graves. The small circular houses around the enclosure are lived in by the Kabakas' ‘Widows’ who look after this site. They are all royal descendants of the kings. Watch your step, I almost stepped on one of these noble ladies who was sleeping next to one of the graves.

    Your entry ticket included the free use of a guide (pictured) and they have a small gift shop as well.

    PLEASE NOTE:
    The Tombs were partially destroyed by a fire in March 2010. I was fortunate enough to see them before that, so some items in my pictures, sadly no longer exist. Rebuilding began on May 13, 2014.

    KASUBI ROYAL TOMBS - KAMPALA, UGANDA KASUBI ROYAL TOMBS - KAMPALA, UGANDA KASUBI ROYAL TOMBS - KAMPALA, UGANDA KASUBI ROYAL TOMBS - KAMPALA, UGANDA KASUBI ROYAL TOMBS - KAMPALA, UGANDA
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    DJIBOUTI, go into the countryside

    by sachara Updated Apr 28, 2014

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    To explore and enjoy Djibouti you have to go out off the capital Djibouti City. The small country in North East Africa has a huge diversity of geologically odd landscapes.

    The limestone chimneys in the Lake Abbé at the border with Ethiopia 140km southwest of Djibouti City are magical, especially at sunset and sunrise. No surprise that this background was chosen for the movie 'Ape Planet' .

    The Bay of Ghoubet is well known for the possibility to swim with whale sharks. Unluckily I visited Djibouti not in the right season to do so. We stayed one night at the Bay of Ghoubet and visited from there the saltlake Assal being the deepest point of Africa.

    The next early morning we visited the spectacular vulcanic landscape between the Bay and saltlake with the youngest vulcano Ardoukoba (1978). We walked over lava, climbed the crater rim and enjoyed the views.

    The limestone chimneys of Lac Abb�� Magical sunset at Lac Abb�� Lac Assal ( - 150m) deepest point of Africa Canyon of division African, Arabic & Nubian plates Vulcanic area of Ardoukoba
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    SOMALILAND

    by sachara Updated Apr 27, 2014

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    Somaliland is the northern independent part of Somalia. The Republic of Somaliland is a country that officially not exists, because the democratic government is not recognised by the international community.

    In Somaliland are the most incredible rockpaintings of the African continent at about 120 locations. I visited the most well known in Las Geel, studied by French archaeologists in 2003 and the ones of Dhagax Kure, not far from Hargeisa the capital.

    For the neolithic rockpaintings of 5000 years old you have to climb e little to reach the shelters and overhangs. The paintings have red and yellow ochre, white and sometimes black colours. They are not only at the walls, but also at the ceilings. It takes some time before you recognise all the depicted cows, humans, goats, dogs and sometimes a giraffe.

    Besides the rockpaintings of Las Geel and Dhagax KureI I visited also the capital Hargeisa, the harbour town Berbera, the Sheikh mountains and the second largest town of the country Burao.

    Rockpaintings Las Geel Rockpaintings Las Geel Rockpaintings Dhagax Kure Mountains of Sheikh Hargeisa, memorial at Independence Road
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    SUDAN, Meroe pyramids, Royal City and temples

    by sachara Updated Jan 17, 2014

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    The pyramids of Meroë are the most popular tourist attraction in Sudan. The site has two clusters of pyramids, the Northern and the Southern cemetaries. There are about 100 pyramids. The Northern cluster located at a sandy ridge is the best preserved. Especially at sunset the site has a magical atmosphere.

    Meroe was the principal residence of the Kingdom of Kush, a major power in the ancient world from the 8th century BC to the 4th century AD. From the 3rd century BC Meroe was the site for most royal burials.

    Beside the cemetaries with pyramids Meroe includes the ruins of the Royal city along the river and the temples of Mussawarat es-Sufra and Naqa in the desert. In 2011 the archaelogical sites of the Mereotic Empire became a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

    According to UNESCO:
    "The Archaeological Sites of the Island of Meroe, a semi-desert landscape between the Nile and Atbara rivers, was the heartland of the Kingdom of Kush, a major power from the 8th century B.C. to the 4th century A.D. The property consists of the royal city of the Kushite kings at Meroe, near the River Nile, the nearby religious site of Naqa and Musawwarat es Sufra.
    It was the seat of the rulers who occupied Egypt for close to a century and features, among other vestiges, pyramids, temples and domestic buildings as well as major installations connected to water management. Their vast empire extended from the Mediterranean to the heart of Africa, and the property testifies to the exchange between the art, architectures, religions and languages of both regions."

    We stayed in the Meroe Camp for two nights not far from the pyramids. We visit not only the two Northern and Southern cemetaries. but also the ruins of the Royal City close to the Nile and the Western Cemetary. On the way back to Khartoum we visited the temple complexes of Naqa and Mussawarat es Sufra.

    For more information:
    Meroë
    Mussawarat

    Mero�� pyramids at sunset Mero�� pyramids Mero�� Royal City ruins Naqa, lion temple Mussawarat temple
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    SUDAN, Jebel Barkal and the Napatan Region

    by sachara Updated Jan 17, 2014

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    Jebel Barkal or Holy Mountain is a natural sandstone hill of 100m dominating the plain along the Nile. The ancient Egyptians and the Kushites believed the mountain was the home of the god Amun, the throne of two lands. At the foot of the mountain is a museum, the Temple of Amun, the temple of Mut and a royal cemetery with pyramids.

    Jebel Barkal and the four other archaeological sites (Nuri, El-Kurru, Sanam and Zuma) are an UNESCO World Heritage site. They are testimony to the Napatan (900 to 270 BC) and Meroitic (270 BC to 350 AD) cultures, of the second kingdom of Kush.

    According to UNESCO:
    "The pyramids, palaces, temples, burial chambers and funerary chapels of Gebel Barkal and the Sites of the Napatan Region and their related relief, writings and painted scenes on walls represent a masterpiece of creative genius demonstrating the artistic, social, political and religious values of a human group for more than 2000 years.
    Jebel Barkal and the other sites of the property bear an exceptional witness of the Napato-Meroitic (Kushite) civilization that prevailed in the Nile Valley from the 9th Century BC to the Christianization of the country in the 6th Century. This civilization had strong links to the northern Pharaonic and other African cultures"

    We stayed for three days in the Nubian Resthouse in Karima, opposite the Jebel Barkal. From here we could easily visit the Jebel Barkal, the museum and the sites at the foot of the mountain by feet. The tombs of El Kurru and the pyramids of Nuri we visited by car. El Kurru is a Royal Cemetery south of Karima and the Jebel Barkal, Here you can descend in the painted tombs. Nuri is a Royal cemetery with pyramids a few kms upstream from Karima at the opposite bank of the Nile.

    For more information
    Jebel Barkal
    El Kurru
    Nuri

    Jebel Barkal, the Nile valley at the background Temple of Amun at the foot of Jebel Barkal Columns with Hathor outside the temple of Mut Tombs of El Kurru Pyramids of Nuri
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    TUNISIA, Tunis

    by sachara Updated Jan 16, 2014

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    Tunis is an easygoing Northern African city. In Tunis you have besides the french Nouvelle Ville the medina. From the 12th to the 16th century Tunis was one of the greatest and wealthiest cities in the Islamic world. The medina of Tunis is declared UNESCO World Heritage Site, because "some 700 monuments, including palaces, mosques, mausoleums, madrases and fountains, testifying to this remarkeable past''

    I visited Tunis three times and still didn't have discovered all the treasures of the city. In the medina you can find a lot of souks , the Great Mosque and a lot more historical buildings. The interesting Bardo Museum is housed west of the medina. From Tunis you can also visit Cartage and Sidi Bou Said north of the city, easily reached by TGM, the suburban railway.

    For more pictures and information look at my Tunisia page.

    Tunis Tunis Tunis Tunis Tunis
    Related to:
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    THE MUSSOLINI STEPS

    by DAO Updated Dec 26, 2013


    What in the world? If you go for a visit to the fantastic Ethiopian Ethnological Museum you will see these weird stairs leading to ….nowhere! It gets stranger from there. On top of the stairs is a Lion! In fact it is the Lion of Judea – the symbol of the Ethiopian Royal family. Here is the story. The Italians invaded and occupied Ethiopia form 1936-1941. The Ethnological Museum, on the grounds of Addis Ababa University, used to be Emperor Haile Selassie’s Palace and residence. The Italians decided to build the stairs just in front with each step representing a year in the reign of Benito Mussolini and the fascists since 1922. A kind of poke in the eye to Ethiopian people. Well, the Allies threw the Italians out and the Emperor returned. Rather than be spiteful, Haile Selassie had his personal symbol put on top to show who came out on top!

    THE MUSSOLINI STEPS THE ENTRANCE TO THE PALACE
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