Kante Local Customs

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  • Local Customs
    by grets
  • Local Customs
    by grets

Most Recent Local Customs in Kante

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    Sacrifice

    by grets Updated Mar 21, 2007

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    The word sacrifice comes from an old English expression “to make sacred”, and sacrifice is part of everyday life in rural Ghana. Sacrifice is basically making an offering in the form of food, drink or an animal to appease the gods and is used in traditional religions all over the world. We saw evidence of chickens being sacrificed, as well as skulls of goats. In the past, it has been reported that human sacrifice took place, although any current involvement in this outlawed activity is vehemently denied.

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    Millet

    by grets Updated Mar 21, 2007

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    The Taberma also grow millet. Millet is grass-like grain grown throughout West Africa for use as food for humans and animals. Millet is separated from the husks, then washed and toasted. It can then be eaten more or less as it is, just boiled with water (used as an accompaniment to meat in the same way as rice may be used), flour can be made from the grain, as well as beer.

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    Initiation ceremony - female

    by grets Updated Mar 21, 2007

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    Although officially banned, female circumcision does take place in various parts of West Africa. I will not go into the rights or wrongs here, all I will say is that during the initiation ceremony, the woman will wear a hat to symbolise the antelope – for speed, grace and suppleness.

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    Initiation ceremony - male

    by grets Updated Mar 21, 2007

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    Although officially banned, female circumcision does take place in various parts of West Africa. I will not go into the rights or wrongs here, all I will say is that during the initiation ceremony, the woman will wear a hat to symbolise the antelope – for speed, grace and suppleness.

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    Fonio

    by grets Updated Mar 21, 2007

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    The Taberma grow – amongst other things – fonio, the smallest of all millet species. Not only nutritious, it is also one of the fastest growing cereals, reaching maturity in six to eight weeks. Fonio is used to make couscous, bread, porridge and beer.

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    Entering the Takienta

    by grets Updated Mar 21, 2007

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    Everything the Taberma people do, in all aspects of their lives, is based on readiness to fight, including entering the Takienta backwards. That was they can be ready facing the outside world if the enemy should attack. They will never be taken by surprise.

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    Baby naming ceremony

    by grets Updated Mar 21, 2007

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    At eight weeks old, the babies are taken to a sacred place on the terrace of the Takienta, where it is washed for the first time, using the bowls seen in picture two. The cleansing is symbolic of ‘life after dark’ – bringing life to the new baby.

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    Ancestral worship

    by grets Updated Mar 21, 2007

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    As animists, the Taberma people worship their ancestors, and each of these cones represents the spirits of one of the forbearers. Sacrifices are performed atop the cones from time to time.

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    Breaking away from your family

    by grets Updated Mar 21, 2007

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    When the son is old enough to start his own family, he will go out with his father and fire off an arrow. Where the arrow lands is where he will build his Takienta for his own family.

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Kante Local Customs

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