Dougga Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by Quartzy
  • Things to Do
    by Willettsworld
  • Things to Do
    by Willettsworld

Most Recent Things to Do in Dougga

  • Maria81's Profile Photo

    Licinian Baths

    by Maria81 Updated Jan 8, 2010

    Where?

    Pretty much in the centre of Dougga, maybe 100 yards from the Forum

    What?

    At the Licinian Baths one can still see the original walls, as well asthe tunnel used by the slaves who kept the baths going, with thestructure of the baths in pretty good state of repair, considering theage.

    The name comes from the Licinii family who donated the baths forpublic enjoyment, mostly in winter. The frigidarium (cold water baths) with its triple arcades at both endsis also worth a mention, as well as the general views from the baths

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Quartzy's Profile Photo

    Incredible - a must-see!

    by Quartzy Updated Jun 4, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Dougga is located in the West of Tunisia, about 3 or 4 hours away from Sousse.

    You shouldn't have a problem to book a tour of the ruins from Sousse or Hammamet - and probably most touristic cities - and you should do it (or go on your own if you please). We were lucky enough to have a private tour, that is, it was just the two of us plus the driver, and we could spend all the time we wanted there, which is not always possible with a bigger group.

    Anyhow, it is a very impressive site and one of the things you shouldn't miss if in Tunisia.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Libyo-Punic Mausoleum

    by Willettsworld Written Aug 29, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The Mausoleum of Ateban in Dougga, in the valley, is the only surviving Numidian/Punic structure in Tunisia. (Another was recently discovered at Sabratha in Libya.) The monument was almost completely destroyed in 1842, when the British consul in Tunis extracted from it a bilingual inscription on the facade. It was rebuilt by a French archeologist in 1910. The three-story monument, 21m/69ft high, was built about the middle of the A.D. second century for Ateban, a contemporary of Masinissa, son of Jepmatath and grandson of Palu. The bilingual inscription in Punic and Numidian (now in the British Museum) made it possible to decipher the Libyan script devised by the Numidians - an early form of the Tifinagh script which is still used by the Touareg of the Sahara.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Arch of Sepitmus Severus

    by Willettsworld Written Aug 29, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    The Arch of Septimius Severus (5m/16ft wide) was erected in A.D. 205 to mark the town's promotion to the status of municipium, which carried with it the right to its own constitution, administration and civic law. Sepitmus Severus was Rome's first African-born emperor. The arch leads into the road from Carthage to Theveste (T├ębessa). There's a reconstruction picture of how it would have looked like nearby.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Cyclops Baths

    by Willettsworld Written Aug 29, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    Adjoining the House of the Trifolium in Dougga is the complex of buildings known as the Baths of the Cyclopes, with vaulted rooms in the basement. On the south side of the complex are the baths proper, in the frigidarium of which was a mosaic of the Cyclopes (now, like the others, in the Bardo National Museum). A feature of the baths is the well preserved public latrine (entered from a side street), with twelve seats on a horseshoe-shaped bench and a drainage system feeding into the town's main drain. This was used in order for one to dip their sponge (which was on a stick) into the water channel in front of them so as wipe their behind. We have a phrase in Britain about grabing the wrong end of the stick which comes from this very scene!

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Thermes de Caracalla (Licinian Baths)

    by Willettsworld Written Aug 29, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The Baths of Licinius, or Winter Baths in Dougga, were built around A.D. 260 and rebuilt in the 4th century. So far as the sloping site permitted they were laid out on the usual symmetrical plan. On the north side was the almost exactly square entrance hall, surrounded by a colonnade of twelve columns supporting a "tube vault" of the kind found at Bulla Regia. The walls were faced with marble and the floor was decorated with a mosaic. A small vestibule led into the richly decorated frigidarium (cold room) in the center of the complex. Diametrically opposite the entrance hall was the palaestra, also surrounded by a colonnade. From the frigidarium the bather entered the tepidarium (warm bath) to the north and beyond this the caldarium (hot bath), heated by an under-floor hypocaust. Other rooms included a latrine and the sudatorium (sweat bath).

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Temple of Juno-Caelestis

    by Willettsworld Written Aug 29, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    To the west of the Arch of Alexander Severus lies the Temple of Juno-Caelestis - the Roman equivalent of the Punic goddess Tanit. Its semicircular layout recalls the crescent moon which was the commonest symbol for Tanit. Built between 222 and 235 by Julius Gabinius and his wife Julia Gabinia Venusta, the peripteral temple is surrounded by a semicircular portico which itself is enclosed by a semicircular wall. The basin for ritual purification lay between the ring wall and a subsidiary building to the east of the temple precinct. On the north side of the temple is an apse, constructed when it was converted into a church.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Arch of Alexander Severus

    by Willettsworld Written Aug 29, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    No Roman town would be complete without a token arch and Dougga has two. This one is the better preserved of the two, located to the west of the Forum over the city's main western entrance. It was erected between A.D. 222 and 235, probably to celebrate the granting of further privileges to the city.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Cisterns of Aid el-Hammam

    by Willettsworld Written Aug 29, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    To the west of the Capitole and Forum, near the Arch of Alexander Severus, lie the cisterns of Aid el-Hammam. There are 5 in total each 33m/108ft long by 5m/16ft high, with a total capacity of 6,000 cubic meters/1.3million gallons of water.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Cisterns of Ain Mizeb

    by Willettsworld Written Aug 29, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    To the north of the Capitole, along the remains of a Numidian wall, lie the huge cisterns of Ain Mizeb. There are seven basins here with a total capacity of 9,000 cubic meters/2million gallons. From here water - brought in an aqueduct from a spring 12km/7.5miles west of the town - was distributed to the town's baths and fountains and to some private houses. Today the cisterns seem to house various odd parts of statues and stone inscriptions behind gates.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Surrounding countryside

    by Willettsworld Written Aug 29, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    Dougga (or Thugga as it's sometimes known), is the best preserved Roman city in Africa. It's set in a beautiful picturesque setting, surrounded by pastureland and olive-groves over rolling hills in which it overlooks. Take some time to admire the views which are best appreciated at the Temple of Saturn. A shepherd came past with his heard of sheep whilst I was taking it all in and so capped off a memorable visit.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Temple of Saturn

    by Willettsworld Written Aug 29, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    THE building with the best views over the surrounding countryside is the Temple of Saturn which is located to the north of the large Theatre. It was built in A.D. 195 on the site of a pre-Roman temple of Baal (a few ash-urns and funerary stelae from which were found by the excavators). At the east end is a vestibule with four Corinthian columns; the inner courtyard is surrounded on three sides by a Corinthian portico; and at the west end are three cellae. In a cistern under the courtyard was found the head of the cult statue of Saturn, which presumably stood in the central cella (it is now in the Bardo National Museum in Tunis). The cella on the south side has preserved part of its stucco-covered vaulting. Below the temple is a hypogeum, an underground burial-place entered by a flight of seven steps, originally in a pagan cemetery.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Church of Victoria

    by Willettsworld Written Aug 29, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    Just down the hill from the Temple of Saturn to the north of the large Theatre, is this small church which was built in the early 5th century using stone taken from the surrounding temples. The church is the only evidence of Christianity at Dougga.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Crypt

    by Willettsworld Written Aug 29, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    If you follow the path out the back of the theatre and walk over the hill, you'll come to the remains of the Temple of Saturn. Before this, just down the slope of the hill, lies this small Christian Crypt for the Church of Victoria next door. The Crypt contains large stones and sarcophagi.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Theatre

    by Willettsworld Written Aug 29, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    One of the highlights of the ruins at Dougga is the Theatre which was built into the hillside in about A.D. 168. It has a diameter of 120m/395ft. The three tiers of seating in the semicircular cavea, with 19 rows in each, rise to a height of 15m/50ft, with an arched corridor running round the top, which, altogether could accommodate 3,500 spectators. The theatre was used for performances of comedies and pantomimes. A doorway on the stage leads into a hall with Corinthian columns, the foyer of the theatre. Here there is an inscription naming the generous founder of the theatre and describing its amenities. In the basement of the stage building were property stores and other store-rooms.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Dougga

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

85 travelers online now

Comments

Dougga Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Dougga things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Dougga sightseeing.

View all Dougga hotels