Le Bardo Travel Guide

  • Le Bardo
    by Willettsworld
  • Le Bardo
    by Willettsworld
  • Le Bardo
    by Willettsworld

Le Bardo Things to Do

  • Bronzes

    One of the most famous pieces within the museum is that of the bronze statue of a drunken Hercules brandishing a big club in one hand and his *** in his other. The statue is from Thibar.

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  • Second floor - Acholla

    This room features a Roman thermae discovered in Acholla, 40km north of Sfax. They have rooms for cold baths (frigidarium) and others for warm baths (caldarium). The frigidarium comprises a large rectangular room flanked by two long wings, two bathtubs, a swimming pool and a room with two apses. The caldarium comprises several rooms all of which...

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  • Second floor - Mosaics

    The best and oldest of Africa's mosaics are located on the second floor and come from the Trajan Baths. One mosaic of Ulysses and the Sirens is based on the Odyssey and comes from Dougga, dating from around 260 AD.

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  • First floor - El Jem

    El Jem is famous for its colosseum which was surrounded by fine Roman villas. This room features several small mosaics of animals.

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  • First floor - Dougga

    The Dougga room features a highlight mosaic of the Triumph of Neptune dating from the mid-2nd century AD and comes from the seaside town of Chebba.

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  • First floor - Sousse

    When I entered this huge room I was instantly struck by its wonderful domed ceiling. I then looked down and saw a huge 2nd century AD mosaic from a Sousse villa of a wealthy horse breeder covering nearly 140 sq metres. The mosaic is that of Neptune's triumph where he is naked on a charriot pulled by four sea-horses surrounded by 56 medallions and...

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  • First floor - Althiburos

    This fabulously decorated room features two balaconies at either end and more mosaics from Althiburos.

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  • First floor - Garden Room

    This room features a reconstruction of a ROman courtyard garden with 4 large urns that have been reconstructed from original remains. In the centre is a small pool. Surrounding the garden are some huge mosaics with nautical themes.

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  • First floor - Columns & capitols

    This small area before the Mahdia shipwreck exhibits features columns and different types of capitols.

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  • First floor - Oudhna (Uthina)

    Leading off from one side of the reception room of Carthage is a room featuring mosaics from Oudhna (uthina). These features animals such as tigers and lions killing deer and horses.

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  • First floor - Carthage

    Statues and mosaics from Carthage fill the museums centrepiece room which is a grand, colonnaded reception room with an icing sugar ceiling. There is a huge statue of Jupiter Capitoline from the Odeon in Carthage and one of Venus the goddess of love hiding her bosom under her gown.

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  • First floor - Beys private apartment

    This area of the museum was once the ruling beys private apartment which is decorated with tiles and stuccoed and now contains the onlt contemporary portrait of the poet Virgil listening to Clio and Melpomene. This mosaic was found in Sousse and is one of the jewels of the museum.

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  • Ground floor - Roman Emperors

    The last room on the ground floor features heads of Roman emperors such as Auguste from El-Jem, Vitellius, Vespasian from Bulla Regia, Trajan from Thuburbo Majus, Lucius Verus from Dougga, Severus and Gordian from Carthage.

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  • Ground floor - Bulla Regia

    These wonderful statues are the best in the museum and come from Roman Bulla Regia. They feature Apollo dating from the 2nd century AD.

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  • Ground floor - Early Christian

    In the centre of this room lies the 6th century cruciform baptismal fonr from El-Kantara. On the surrounding walls are wonderful early Christian mosaics including Daniel in the lion's den from a 5th century mausoleum and other mosaics from chapels. There is also an unusual tomb mosaic covering a sarcophagus containing two skeletons.

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  • Ground floor - Sarcophagi

    Around the corner from the Stele in a corridor leading to the exit lie some Roman sarcophagi. The corridor leads to the Tiles Hall, which was closed when I visited.

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  • Ground floor - Stele

    A Stele is a stone or wooden slab erected for funerary or commemorative purposes. They are decorated with the names and titles of the deceased or living which are carved in relief.

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  • Ground floor - Baal Hammon

    The next room on the ground floor features statues connected with Baal Hammon, a diety worshiped at Carthage.

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  • Ground floor - Hermaion d'El Guettar

    After entering through the entrance to the museum on the ground floor, there's a series of rooms on the right where the first exhibits prehistoric remains. One of the most unusual exhibits is a recreation of a 40,000 year old religious monument that looks like a pile of stones! The stones are mixed with bones and teeth of animals and pieces of...

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  • Bardo Museum - The building

    The museum is housed in a wonderful palace that was the former official residence of the Husseinite beys that was built in the 13th century. It was later rebuilt in the 17th century and enlarged by a succession of Husseinites before becoming a museum in 1888. When you're visiting look at the building as well as the exhibits! You get the chance to...

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  • Le Bardo Museum

    The Bardo Museum is a must visit whilst in Tunis. Located a few kilometres west of the Medina and city centre, the museum is dominated by a vast collection of wonderful Roman mosaics that once adorned Roman Africa's grandest villas. In fact, there is no other museum in the world, even in Italy, where you get the chance to see countless huge...

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Le Bardo Restaurants

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    by Willettsworld Written Feb 16, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There is a small cafe within the museum but this appeared to be closed when I visited. There is a very good restaurant which I can't remember the name of on the road that leads from the museum to the Metro Leger station of Le Bardo. They do simple lunchtime type food in a rather pink but nice setting.

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Le Bardo Transportation

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    by Willettsworld Written Feb 16, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you're planning on visiting the Bardo Museum (which is a must visit while in Tunis), the easiest way to get there is by tram or Metro Leger as they call it. The museum is near Le Bardo station on line 4. Tickets cost 450 mills but it looked like most people didn't bother and simply went through the barriers. Be warned that the Metro finishes in the early evening so don't wait around late at night for one to arrive!

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