Tunis Favorites

  • Favorites
    by Dizzyhead
  • Favorites
    by Dizzyhead
  • Favorites
    by Fabrizio_M.

Most Recent Favorites in Tunis

  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    Money Matters

    by MikeAtSea Written Apr 16, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Money Matters
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: The local currency is the Dinar. American Express, Visa and travellers cheques are widely accepted, and the US dollar is a good currency to carry them in. ATMs are found in almost every town large enough to support a bank and certainly in all the tourist areas. Credit cards are accepted in souvenir shops and upmarket hotels and restaurants.

    Related to:
    • School Holidays
    • Family Travel
    • Business Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Useful maps

    by Willettsworld Written Feb 16, 2008

    Favorite thing: In some parts of the Medina, you'll find these useful maps which have been made from tiles. Most of the alleys and passageways have their names in both Arabic and French so it shouldn't be hard to find where you are and where you want to go but if you do get lost then simply ask someone or try and head back to the Zaytuna Mosque and get your bearings there.

    Was this review helpful?

  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    Photo Fee

    by MikeAtSea Written Oct 9, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Photo Fee
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: All ancient sites, mosques, museums and antiquities charge a photographic fee. The ticket for this has to be purchased when one buys the entrance ticket. For each camera a separate fee has to be paid. During my visit the fee was 1 Dinar.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • miman's Profile Photo

    Medina of Tunis

    by miman Written Jul 20, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Medina in Tunis
    2 more images

    Favorite thing: The medina of Tunis has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1979. The medina contains some 700 monuments, including palaces, mosques, mausoleums, madrasas and fountains dating from the Almohads and the Hafsids periods.
    These ancient buildings include:
    -the Great Mosque (including the Muslim University and library)
    - Aghlabid Ez-Zitouna Mosque ("Mosque of the Olive") built in 723 by Obeid Allah Ibn-al-Habhab to celebrate the new capital.
    - the Dar-al-Bey, or Bey's Palace, is comprised of architecture and decoration from many different styles and periods and is believed to stand on the remains of a Roman theatre as well as the tenth century palace of Ziadib-Allah II al Aghlab.

    Fondest memory: Shopping in Medina

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Monument to Habib Bourguiba

    by croisbeauty Updated Apr 27, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Monument to Habib Bourguiba

    Favorite thing: Habib Bourguiba (1903-2000) was the leader of the independence struggle of Tunisia and country's first president 1957-1987.
    As a president he was almost like a North African Ataturk. During his time the politics of Tunisia was a long time one of moderate, European-like solutions.
    Under the present presidentship of Tunisia, the monumet was removed from its original position and today it is positioned in between Municipal Theatre and the Cathedral of St. Vincent de Paul.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    The fountain with the clock tower

    by croisbeauty Written Apr 27, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The fountain with the clock tower
    2 more images

    Favorite thing: Not so long ago, here stood the monument to Habib Bourguiba, the first and longtime president of Tunis. Then the new sheriff came to the town and the monument was removed to a new location, but still in this avenue.
    As I could noticed, there is a presidential system of governing in Tunis, it seems the president is very powerful man, almost like a medieval kings.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Avenue Habib Bourguiba

    by croisbeauty Updated Apr 27, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Avenue Habib Bourguiba
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: Actually, I haven't seen much of the town, except for medina and Le Bardo district. It was a half day trip only and the main target was to visit the Bardo National Museum.

    Fondest memory: Avenue Habib Bourguiba is a fine example of how strong the French influence was in the architecture of the city. Everything you see around here remainds on Paris, except for the flags.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • schlumpf's Profile Photo

    Remember to change all your money left, or spent t

    by schlumpf Written Jan 6, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: It happends something strange…Once I got to the airport, I had still some hundred box in my pocket and I though, ok, I will buy something in the airport, cigarettes or whatever else…

    …I got to the shopping area and they accept only USD or EURO, nothing else, even not the local currency!!!!!

    You can spend the local currency buying in the cafeteria…com’on I will not spend 100 Dollaz drinking coffees!!!

    So, remember to change your money left before overtaking the custom, or simply spend them all, otherwise are just paper!!!! (clear, you can change it at home, but the exchange rate will be definitely
    another!!!!)

    Was this review helpful?

  • aliante1981's Profile Photo

    Doors & Windows

    by aliante1981 Written Jan 2, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Many Tunisian towns and cities, including the capital city of Tunis, have since long been famous for the beautiful gates and windows of the houses. While the houses might be simple and minimalist, with just white walls and occasionally, scenes of the Hadj to Mecca, the wealth of the owners transpired in the workmanship of these traditional - and highly useful :)) - elements.

    The dominating colours for doors are blue and beige (remember the door on the front page of one of the Lonely Planet guides?) with iron decorations in ornaments and often elaborate door knobs, while windows are dominated by blue.

    Was this review helpful?

  • chrissyalex's Profile Photo

    Avenue Habib Bourgiba

    by chrissyalex Updated Mar 3, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Avenue Habib Bourguiba is the "Champs Elysses" of Tunis. This mile long tree shaded street is Tunis's most famous and it is lined with shops,cafes and banks.
    It is named after Tunisia's first president, Habib Bourguiba. His policies made Tunisia one of the world's most moderate Arab nations. He was very important to women's rights and made polygamy against the law and gave women equal rights in divorce. He also did much for education,healthcare and agriculture.

    Was this review helpful?

  • seagoingJLW's Profile Photo

    Visit a suuq

    by seagoingJLW Updated Jan 8, 2003

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Irwin in the suuq

    Favorite thing: Visit a suuq. Here is Irwin in the Suuq of Attarine along the north wall of the Djama ez Zitouna (Mosque of the Olive Tree.)

    Suuq el Attarine specializes mainly in perfume. Suuq Birka is the gold souk.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Have a glimpse of a tiny...

    by maxovna Written Sep 12, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Have a glimpse of a tiny little town on the hills - Sidi Bou Said. It preserved all kinds of Tunisian architecture and is protected by the Nature Protection Organization. The most amazing thing about Sidi Bou Said is that all town is in blue and white. This is the place of pilgrimage of painters from all over the world - it inspires them.

    Was this review helpful?

  • maxovna's General Tip

    by maxovna Written Sep 12, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: I was impressed by the Hall of Sculptures in Bardo museum. In the corner there is a statue of Jupiter, his one arm is raised upwards (taking energy from the Heaven), the other hand gives this energy to you. Hold his hand for a while and get some energy.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Visit Bardo Museum , which...

    by maxovna Written Sep 12, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Visit Bardo Museum , which can be proud of its collection of mosaic (since the Roman times) - the largest in the world. It is situated in the building which is more than 300 years old, built in Arabic and Muslem style, the ceilings are of plaster, the walls are ceramic.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Cam_el's Profile Photo

    My MUST for Tunis is the short...

    by Cam_el Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: My MUST for Tunis is the short trip to Sidi Bou Said. The trip itself is an adventure! Simply get on the local train that heads North. Everyone from the chicken to the businessman will travel with you. Bring a friend to hold on to; the train is often so packed you can't find a pole to hang onto.

    Get off at Sidi Bou Said and follow the wave of people off to your right. The town of cliffs and white washed walled houses is located on the coast. Take a leisurely stroll down to the waters edge. The walk back up isn't as bad as it seems. The cafes await you at the top to refill your camel reserve anyways.

    Sidi Bou Said is normally quite touristy, not always a treat, but the sights are well worth it. I wouldn't recomend making purchases here. You can find better deals in the markets in Tunis. However, if you lack Arabic or French fluency skills for Tunis's bazaar, it can be a shoppers relief.

    Fondest memory: I miss the smell of the streets in the morning when the sounds from the minarets wake you up 'far too early for a Friday.'

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Tunis

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

63 travelers online now

Comments

Tunis Favorites

Reviews and photos of Tunis favorites posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Tunis sightseeing.

View all Tunis hotels