Tunis Local Customs

  • Local Customs
    by croisbeauty
  • Local Customs
    by croisbeauty
  • Christian room
    Christian room
    by croisbeauty

Most Recent Local Customs in Tunis

  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Muslim Customs

    by barryg23 Updated Dec 17, 2006

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    Tunisia is a Muslim country and as a consequence many of the people, especially the women, dress quite conservatively. Another Muslim custom is the lack of open displays of affection between couples. However, Tunis wasn't quite so conservative as this and the customs of the people here were somewhere between what I’ve described above and what you might call western or European.

    This wasn't something we noticed when we started our trip in Tunis but it was quite noticeable after we had returned to Tunis, having spent so much time exploring the smaller places in the rest of the country.

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  • nina_z's Profile Photo

    Haggle when shopping it's a must!

    by nina_z Written Aug 9, 2006

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    If you shop in Tunise on the street or in markets do haggle for a better price. You're expected to do so and you'll offend the shop keepers if you don't or be considered a stupid tourist as they'll rip you off your money. It's fun, just try it. Always make the shop keeper tell his price first. It will be over the top. You then have to say a sum which is a third of his price. Usuallly, you won't settle for it but afer a few minutes of haggling you'll come to something acceptable for both of you. Don't be offended if they call you a criminal it's just the part of their fun and drama and don't hesitate to walk out of the shop if the shop keeper refuses to come up with a reasonable price. Most likely he'll come running after you with a better deal.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Head of Jupiter

    by croisbeauty Written Apr 27, 2005

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    Head of Jupiter
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    The Bardo Museum contents the most important archaeological collection in the Maghreb (Marocco, Algeria, Tunisia) and is one of the richest in the world in Roman mosaics. It is, undoubtely, a treasure chest of artistic founds, and this head of Jupiter is but one.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Bardo Museum

    by croisbeauty Updated Apr 26, 2005

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    This is the greatest and the most important mosaic in the museum. Unfortunately, I can't tell you nothing about it. When we entered in the room, it was overcrowded, especially around the mosaic. Since it was almost impossible to hear the story about it, I was taking picture of the statues.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Bardo Museum

    by croisbeauty Updated Apr 26, 2005

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    Christian Room - devoted to Carthage
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    The main room of the museum, so-called Christian Room, is flanked by mosaics many from Tabarka. Many beautiful marble statues, from Apollo to various goddess, can be seen here. Works of art from ancient Roman times, made by unkonown artists, have perfect body proportions.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Bardo Museum

    by croisbeauty Updated Apr 26, 2005

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    Christian room
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    The Bardo National Museum was inaugurated in 1888, with probably the world's best display of mosaics and certainly North Africa's best Roman collection.
    This is the Corridor of Stelae and Sarcophagi, these and marble funerary statues.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Bardo Museum

    by croisbeauty Updated Apr 26, 2005

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    Bardo Museum
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    The Le Bardo district of Tunis is home to the museum of the same name, best onown and the most important museum in Tunisia. The museum has grown up around various mansions and constructions, built by the Hafsids and the Beys.
    At the end of the 19th century it covered an area of many acres and was closed by a wall with ramparts and towers.

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  • schlumpf's Profile Photo

    Smoke the Chincha

    by schlumpf Written Jan 7, 2005

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    What is inside the arab culture, and the Tunisian one, is to smoke this fruit tabak with the arghile (what they do call Chincha)…

    It is something really good (if you are a smoker)….and something different!

    So, if you are a smoker, do not miss it!!!!

    You can do this in every local place, just ask for this!

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  • schlumpf's Profile Photo

    Smile first then kiss four times

    by schlumpf Written Jan 7, 2005

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    What I do like more of Tunisia is the people, and what I do like more of the people is their smile and their kindness…something that blow my mind up!

    You will just need to sit in a local place, and you will be immediately in contact with some persons which will approach you asking some questions….where are you form, what are you doing here, do you like Tunis and so on…

    Wow! What a kind and open people!

    When you are on your own way, walking in the market, or in the streets, and you will feel lot of eyes on you, simply watch them and say “hello” or better “Schokra”, they wuill come to you and will kiss you 4 times (the Tunisian way to cheer)!!! Amaaaaaaaazing!!!!!

    Tunisian are so lovable!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  • Cam_el's Profile Photo

    Don't be scared. Be polite to...

    by Cam_el Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Don't be scared. Be polite to everyone and smile all you can. To greet people you will usually kiss on the cheek up to 4 times depending on how well you know the person. Physical touch is common between the same sex.(non-sexual of course) Holding a friend's hand is gracious. The sexes are usually separated. Don't consider this a loss. You will be having so much fun you won't even notice. Women often dance hours of the day away in their home. Women: Men won't kidnap you or anything but I found that I was respected much more than some female tourists they talked about because I followed their ways and stayed with women most of the time.

    Tunisians are very sociable people. Expect to spend a lot of time chatting even if you can't communicate that well. Coffee houses are often filled with people playing different games or smoking a shisha (narjihla).

    Eating should only be done using your right hand if possible. This also goes for handing money to people. The left hand is considered unclean. Which leads me to the toilets. Most of them are squatting toilets and cannot handle toiletpaper even if you bring your own. Tunisians use their left hand and then wash it off. If you forget your toiletpaper...it is not as bad as you think!

    Dress conservatively. You don't need to cover up from head to toe but don't wear mini-skirts or bra tops. I found a long skirt let in more cool air anyways.

    I would also recommend bringing some small gifts from your home. They will often present you with fruit or a small gift. It is nice to return.

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  • Aragina's Profile Photo

    Tunisia is fundamentaly an...

    by Aragina Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Tunisia is fundamentaly an Islam culture, I found that not all women wore the clothes that most Islam women did, and the Berber women wore the bightest clothing, but politness and an understanding of Islam I think is useful.

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  • As in all Islamic countries,...

    by lunaviews Written Aug 24, 2002

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    As in all Islamic countries, dress moderately - men and women alike. Cover your skin - the locals are not used to it and it upsets them. You are a guest in their country so follow their lead and show respect. Also, say 'shokran' - thank you - a lot. It works wonders.

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Tunis Local Customs

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