Hammamet Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by croisbeauty
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by croisbeauty
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by croisbeauty

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Hammamet

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    Matmata

    by ivanab Written Jun 25, 2007

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    In the desert, some people still live in their homes underground or in the homes they made themselves in rocks. It is colder and easier to live there because of the heats, but it is very very simple life. It is interesting to see the way these people live, so you can go and visit some of the families that opened their home to tourists.

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    Chott El Jerid

    by ivanab Written Jun 25, 2007

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    This is salt desert with termal-salted water. Amazing are the colours, especially the colour of the red colour of the water. If you're visiting this as apart of a jeep-safari to desert, you'll be stopping here only for a couple of minutes, just to go to the toilet in a little shop, buy some suovenirs (esp. desert roses) and take a photo of this nature's wonder.

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    Douz

    by ivanab Written Jun 18, 2007

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    Douz is probably the most famous place in Tunisia for riding camels. In Douz riding camels has become a town's business. People give their camels, one or two per family, for riding for tourists, and every family gets the same percent of the earned money. Everything is shared, money for riding, from selled pictures and souvenirs, even tips, they have to put every penny aside and in the end divide it between families. You get to ride cemels for an hour, and it's one of the most wanted aactivities in Tunisia.

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    Tozeur

    by ivanab Written Jun 18, 2007

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    This is the biggest oaze and the palm farm in Tunisia. You can go to take a ride with this carrriages through the oaze. You'll get to see all the platns that grow in this kind of land (palm trees, orange and banana trees...), get a demonstrature of how to seed and palm with hands, and other fun stuff. The drivers of the carriages are extremely nice and funny, sio for me it was a very funny thing to do.

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    Tamerza

    by ivanab Updated Jun 17, 2007

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    This is the second most famous oaze in south Tunisia- it's the place where famous movie The English Patient is taken. You have to climb a little to get to see the water and the view, which can be hard because of the high temperatures, but i deeply reccomend it because it's definitely worth it in the end. And after you can relax in the little 'cafe' where you can get everything- from beer, cola, tea, coffie, ice--cream and even some snacks.

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    Chebikka

    by ivanab Updated Jun 17, 2007

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    This is the biggest waterfall in Tunisia. Water from it is enough to supply both oazes, Chebikka and Tamerza, which are near each other. The landscape is really impressive, and the water surrounded with all this sand looks really stunning.

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    Kairouan

    by ivanab Updated Jun 10, 2007

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    If you decide to go on a two-day safari trip, this mosque will be one of the first things you're going to see on the journey to the country's inside. It is one of the oldest mosques in the world, and its the reason why this little town is so popular. Some trips also include a visit to a museum in Kairuan, where you'll have a short presentation about Islam and Muhamed, and how religion affects and combines with life in Tunisia.

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    nabeul

    by quartinb Updated Aug 22, 2005

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    capital of the gouvernat de Nabeul. most known for the camel fair, right at the center of the town, and the handycrafters fair wich i've seen and went on friday, the day of the week that it is held. if u apreciate shopping and all the fuss of a souk, this one, taking place,on the streets of nabeul u can not miss it. a wonderfull exprience and be ready to bargain, and bring back some souvenirs from Tunisa.

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    carthage

    by quartinb Updated Aug 22, 2005

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    In the outskirts of Tunis (15 km north of the capital), on the Gulf of Tunis. The Romans returned to Carthage and built on its ruins a new Carthage resplendent with great buildings, theaters, villas and baths. Carthage became the administrative capital for Africa and its importance can be seen in the Antoinine Thermal baths, one of the largest built under the Roman empire with the "cool room" an amazing 47 meters long and 15 meters high. The Roman theater is still used today for the summer festival of Carthage.

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    sidi bou said

    by quartinb Updated Aug 22, 2005

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    Sidi Bou Said this lovely blue and white village, gaily perched on the cliffs overlooking the Bay of Tunis, is perhaps the most cherished in Tunisia. The legend tells of Saint Louis - coming to wage war he fell in love with a Berber princess and, changing his name became the patron saint of this village where he lived in joy and peace. Visit Sidi Bou Said, fall under its charm and the story will seem most logical.

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    The coutryside

    by percy961 Written Apr 8, 2004

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    We hired a "Grand Taxi" and explored the local countryside. One of our stops was at the village of Sidi Jdidi. We visited the local health spa, which runs on natural underground hot water that are full of natural minerals. We then drove up into the "Saw" mountains with its wonderful views of the distant coastline

    In all the local villages we were made very welcome by the locals.

    Local salesman
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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    Wind farms

    by yurxlnc Written Dec 17, 2005

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    The wind farms were all over the country, as the country has been suffering from the rise in oil prices.

    wind turbines close up wind turbines

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Hammamet Off The Beaten Path

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