Sousse Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by katalin
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by katalin
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by katalin

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Sousse

  • Darkswede's Profile Photo

    Getting around buy train and bus

    by Darkswede Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Not all roads lead to Rome  (The Oasis in Gabes)
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    Feel like doing a trip around Tunisia on your own? Well why not take the train to Julius Cesars Amfi theater in El Jem, or take the train or louage to the capital Tunis and visit its huge Medina, or the worlds biggest mosaic collection at the Bardo Museum or Concore Carthage like the romans did.

    You can do alot on your own ... the transportation network in Tunisia works!!!

    Train....

    Go to the state owned railway´s website and find out where u can go by train and what the time table is for didderen lines.

    Sorry to say but the websites English section has been under construction for the last couple of years ;0) So use the French one. Its easy to understand even if you like me dont speak much more than bon jour.

    www.sncft.com.tn

    then click on Horaires for the different time tables for different lines, grandes lignes = major or big lines going through the country, and regional lignes for thoses around the Tunis capitol area.

    I recomend to take a first class or even better a Comfort class ticket because in these classes the aircondition works better and they are less crowded and the price difference is minimal.

    Bus... = not fun anymore after the first 1-2 hours, I did it to Douz (the entrance to Sahara) once and dont think I will do it again all the way from Sousse, 8 hours or so. But OK... you Can take the train (comfort class) to Gafsa and then the bus from there ...

    Anyway bus is a functional way of traveling in Tunisia even though the train is more comfortable it does not go to all places of interest.

    Before going on a bus trip or a louage trip on your own, contact the office du Tourism in your vacation town and get the latest info on times and prices and hepl with hotel recomendations in your coming destinations. The tourist offices are VERY good and helpful and English is no problemas there. Make sure that u get the phone number and adress to the different tourist offices where u are going as well.

    So pack your night bags and get out there and experiance Tunisia the Tunisian way.

    Related to:
    • Trains
    • Luxury Travel
    • Budget Travel

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Sofra cistern

    by leics Written Aug 10, 2010

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    Sofra cistern wall

    Not much information about this, I'm afraid.

    The Sofra cistern is in the middle of the medina, surrounded by blank walls. It dates back to at least the 11th century, and was apparently created by building around an existing Byzantine church. The entrance is in the north-eastern corner, but it was closed when I visited.

    You'll find it to the south-west of the covered souk area.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    A sculpture

    by leics Written Aug 10, 2010

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    Mystery sculpture

    Ok.......I don't know what this represents, or why it's in Sousse, so this is not so much a tip as a request for help.

    It's clearly important though; lots of people had their photos take in front of it whilst i was sitting in the shade people-watching. It looks quite new.

    It's in Place Farhat Hached, at the entrance to the medina, opposite the Soula shopping centre.

    If you can add more info, please send me a Vtmail.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Railway lines......

    by leics Written Aug 10, 2010

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    Railway lines.......

    Place Farhat Hached is a huge 'square' (except it's not a square), thronged with traffic and people. Horns blare, engines roar, caleches trot past (ok, they mostly have to walk........), police blow their whistles, pedestrians wander at will between the cars (zebra crossings exist, but mean nothing), huge lorries push their way through the traffic en route from the docks (the ships are so near they look as if they are in the 'square itself).

    It's a chaotic place, fascinating to sit in the shade and watch it all happening.

    Hoe much more chaotic must it have been when there was a railway line across it as well? The train to Sfax no longer crosses the square, but you can still see the lines in the gap between Boulevard Yahia Ibn Omar and Avenue Mohammed Maarouf, to the north-west of the 'square'.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Trains

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Watch for the Roman bits.......

    by leics Written Aug 10, 2010

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    Bab el Khabli
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    Sousse was a major Roman city in its day (as Hamdrumete). So when you're wandering in the medina keep your eyes open....you'll see more Roman column fragments than you might expect. Usually placed on the corners of buildings, i suspect their function was to prevent damage by passing carts as they turned as well as to add decoration.

    There are several Roman columns and capitals in the entrance to the Ribat, of course.

    And an entirely huge one at Bab el Khabli, at the southern gate of the medina.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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  • moving around sousse

    by williampatrick Written Oct 14, 2008

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    hi ive been many times to sousse and i find there is loads of great eateres in of the back streets just on the big main road up from the beach, good food and great coffee, and local entertainment, the luxury hotels are great as well and friendly and welcoming,

    Related to:
    • Motorcycle
    • Camping
    • Mountain Climbing

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  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    Port el Kantaoui Marina

    by sandysmith Updated Dec 19, 2006

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    Port el Kantaoui marina
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    Port el Kantaoui was Tunisia's first purpose built tourist town and has now established itself as the country's most popular holiday resort. With its own beautifully appointed 300-yacht international marina its a delight to stroll around looking at the swanky yachts in the harbour and there are some lovely waterfront cafes to soak up the atmosphere.

    Related to:
    • Water Sports
    • Fishing

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  • adonai_2012's Profile Photo

    Taste Shisha

    by adonai_2012 Written Sep 29, 2006

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    Apple flavour is my favourite. Not that all the tourists miss this, but I have seen more than one white fat chick staring at me while I enjoyed the tabac. Hehe. It ain't drugs. Just tobacco going though water before you sense it in your mouth. Flavours: available according to one's wish. Nearly all caffes have shisha. The best with it is mint tea (unfortunatelly not available in all caffes, oddly).

    warning: No shisha, if you did not try it before, in Port El Kantoui. Over there they served me so low quality tabac that, if I have not had shisha before, I'd never want to smoke it again!
    ps. I never went to Kantoui again ;)

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  • ianerin's Profile Photo

    Camel Market

    by ianerin Written Apr 20, 2006

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    Outside of town, where city meets desert is the Camel bazaar, where nomads and dealers meet to barter over camels, supplies and other wares. You won't really need to buy anything here unless you are embarking into the desert, but it is a really fun place to experience and watch what goes on.

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  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    Golfing Resort

    by sandysmith Updated Apr 6, 2006

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    Golf monument at night

    As in many resorts along Tunisia, golf courses are popular and especially so in Port el Kantaoui. In fact the town's symbol is a golf ball - each town has its own unique monumnet. Not a very good pic here of it I'm afraid - a quick shot from the coach as we returned home to the airport on our last evening...and my last picture from this holiday!

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  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    Zoo

    by sandysmith Written Mar 30, 2006

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    zoo entrance
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    There is a small zoo and botanical park at Port el Kantaoui. Really it looked very poo rstandard - I mean ducks and guinea pigs and camels (actually dromedies as they have one hump)- on view without having to enter. We didn't visit it didn't look at all worthwhile even for the few dinar entrance fee. If you want to visit a zoo then go to Tunis - we passed a lovely one there.

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    • Zoo

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    Port el Kantaoui Beach

    by sandysmith Written Mar 30, 2006

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    P.E.K. Beach
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    The beach is just a continuation of that from Sousse and right the way along the coast - lovely fine white sand - a bit scruffy towards the back and some seaweed but they are cleaned more in the high season. Sunbeds and parasols for hire as usual. Beach can be accessed either side of the marina.

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    • Water Sports

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    Port el Kantaoui Fountains

    by sandysmith Written Mar 30, 2006

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    dancing fountains
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    Apart from the marina another feature of this tourist village are the so called dancing fountains - you walk past 2 lots after Hannibal Park to eventually reach the marina. At different times of the day they have different displays and at night they are colourfully lit up too - unfortunately we didn't get to see them in the evenings.

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    Hannibal Park

    by sandysmith Written Mar 30, 2006

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    Hannibal Park
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    The tourist train from Sousse to Port el kantaoui use to go to the marina but now it stops ouside the Hannibal Park (children's amusement park) and you walk through this and past the usual carpet traders implorings to see their shop to reach the marina.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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  • Hergla

    by Stretts Written Mar 16, 2006

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    Hergla is a small village about 10km north of Port El Kantaoui - cost 8 DTs in a taxi. This is about the most real Tunisia we found in this tourist area. It has a picturesque working harbour and quaint back streets and alleyways. The people were friendly without the hassle that we found elsewhere in the region. The village is well known for the its weaving of baskets, mats etc from esparto grass. About 500 meters south of the village centre and close to the sea, are the remains of a roman villa of which a quarter have been excavated - a local 'enthusiast' gave us a guided tour even though the site should have closed at midday.

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

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