Grand Mosque, Sousse

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  • THE GREAT MOSQUE
    THE GREAT MOSQUE
    by alyf1961
  • Mosque courtyard and 'kiosk'
    Mosque courtyard and 'kiosk'
    by leics
  • Courtyard inscription
    Courtyard inscription
    by leics
  • alyf1961's Profile Photo

    THE GREAT MOSQUE

    by alyf1961 Written Jan 13, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    THE GREAT MOSQUE

    The Mosque is built using large stone blocks, some of these blocks were taken from the Roman baths at Carthage which is one of the reasons the baths are not better preserved. It has towers on the north-east and south-east corners and was built to resemble a fortress. It was founded in 851 by Aghlabid Emir Abou'l Abbas Mohamed. It is one of the most ancient examples of Moslem art in North Africa.

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    Visit the Great Mosque

    by leics Written Aug 10, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mosque courtyard and 'kiosk'
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    Tickets from the small booth opposite the entrance (you may have to wait for the man to notice you and come strolling over). They sell tickets for the Ribat there too.

    You'll need to cover shoulder sand knees to visit; jellabas can be borrowed.

    The Great Mosque dates from the 9th century AD, like that Great Mosque in Kairouan. But it's simpler in form, with only and inscription which runs around the inner courtyard wall. You can't go inside the prayer hall, but the doors are left open.

    The muezzin used to call from a domed 'kiosk', rather than a minaret. It dates from the 11th century, and is accessed (not by the public) by a set of unrailed stone steps (in Arabic style).

    You might wonder why the prayer hall carpet is pulled up against the pillars. It's simple: people come to the prayer hall to sit and study, as well as to worship. They often sit with their backs against the pillars,and the carpet just makes it a bit more comfortable.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Great Mosque

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 1, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    Just inside the northern end of the Medina stands the fortress-like Great Mosque, built in 851 AD, a few years after the re-foundation of the town by the Aghlabids, on the model of the Sidi Oqba Mosque in Kairouan. The mosque originally had two defensive towers which in earlier centuries guarded the harbour. The battlemented walls of the courtyard, which is surrounded on three sides by a colonnade of tall horseshoe arches borne on massive piers, are decorated with an elaborate Kufic frieze. The arcade in front of the thirteen-aisled prayer hall was added in 1675. The prayer hall originally consisted only of three barrel-vaulted bays, but by the 10th century it was found to be too small and was extended by the addition of three rather higher groin-vaulted bays on the side with the qibla wall.

    Open: 8am-1pm Sat-Thur. Closed Fridays. Admission: TD2 from a little kiosk in the square outside the mosque.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

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  • Childish's Profile Photo

    Great Mosque

    by Childish Updated Nov 13, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tunisia, Sousse, Great Mosque
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    Built in 851 the Great Mosque has had its present shape since the reconstruction by Ibrahim II in 883. The gallery-nathex was added in 1675. The Great Mosque doesn't have a minaret. Instead, to call to prayer is used the cupola on the north-east side, to which 26 steps from the courtyard lead.

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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

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  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    Grand Mosque

    by sandysmith Updated Mar 30, 2006

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    Grand Mosque interior
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    This mosque was built in the 9th century, while a domed kiosk was added in the 11th, and serves as a minaret. It was built by the Aghlabid Emir Abou El Abbes Mohammed in 850AD. There is a small charge to enter - tickets from kiosk in the square outside - and remmber to be respectful with dres code, ie. no bare shoulders or knees. As you enter you are faced with the prayer halls - not open to non-muslims. Also for our visit the stairway leading up to the minaret was closed off :-(

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    • Architecture

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