Medina, Sousse

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    Bicycle and Yellow door
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  • Market outside the walls
    Market outside the walls
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    School facade
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  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    Medina

    by sandysmith Updated Mar 30, 2006

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    The Medina of Sousse is one of the finest in Tunisa with its covered bazzars - great place for bargains if you can come out on top with the bartering game. Its a maze of alleyways and easy to get lost - but don't worry its not a huge place and eventually you find your way out! Its fascinating to see the artisans at wok in here too - the shoemenders, jewellers, potters etc..

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  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    Medina Walls

    by sandysmith Updated Mar 29, 2006

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    walls and ramparts
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    The old heart of Sousse, the Medina, is parly enclosed by its old 9th century walls and ramparts with various gates opening into the souks and various mosques and museums. The bus station is just outside these walls and the main station is nearby too. You can't walk on them like in Rhodes, they are not complete or wide enough.

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  • rdorekens's Profile Photo

    Explore the Medina

    by rdorekens Written Apr 27, 2005

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    This is my friend Delila and her son Mohammed

    Sousse medina is small and easily accesible on foot. From the moment you enter the gate you step back in time and all your senses start recognising scents, sights, feel the bygone days that our ancestors not so long ago beheld. Small shops loaded with artefacts, leather goods, jewellery, you name it, adorn the narrow alley streets of the medina. But its the Tunisians which render this place so unique. They are skilled sellers but also good charmers and they will offer you camels if they happen to find a woman of their own taste! The medina is an experience not to be missed.........

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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Medina

    by barryg23 Written Jan 6, 2007

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    Exploring the medina
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    Many people visit Sousse for its beach but the highlight of the city is the medina. It's one of the largest medinas in the country and is home to two impressive monuments - the Ribat and the Mosque - as well as an excellent museum in the old Kasbah. The medina is surrounded by ramparts which data from the 9th century, build around the same time as the Ribat and the Mosque.

    Given the large numbers of tourists in Sousse it's not surprising that many of the shops in the medina are tourist-traps, aimed at visitors. This is especially true in the north-eastern end, near the main monuments and close to where the medina opens out onto the new town.

    Away from this section the medina seems much more traditional with old buildings, small mosques and very few tourists. It's very easy to wander off-the-beaten path in the medina and the friendly locals will always help you if you get lost.

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  • Ikaronaut's Profile Photo

    Medina with the old bazar

    by Ikaronaut Written Aug 30, 2004

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    "Medina" is a word for a town surrounded by walls. In middle age towns in Mediterranean Tunisia was build in this order to protect themselfs from pirates. Nowadays when town spread much wider than the Medina, Medina remain a heart biting of the town. Old Bazar is there, just enter and open your senses as much as you can...

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  • Childish's Profile Photo

    Medina of Sousse

    by Childish Written Nov 14, 2006

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    Tunisia,Sousse Medina,view from Ribat's watchtower
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    Medina of Sousse is on UNESCO World Heritage List because it is almost untouched from the centuries and gives the visitor the idea how the towns from the first centuries of Islam looked like. Medina is surrounded by 2km long city walls built in 859 using stone from ancient Roman buildings and then was renovated in 874 and 1205. From the 6th gates existed originally only two survived till our times: ab el Khabli on the south and Bab el Gharbi on the west. The east gate Bab el Djedid, dates from 1864.
    Kasbah, Ribat and the Great Mosque are some of the monuments there.

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  • ianerin's Profile Photo

    Medina

    by ianerin Written Apr 20, 2006

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    Central Medina Market
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    Sousse's Medina is a World Heritage site and one of the best preserved in North Africa. It is fascinating to take a stroll through its streets and markets. Much of it is in bad repair, but there are many who still live within the old walls.

    One of the highlights is the market, which is less touristy than the shops in the new city, but not exactly bargain basement. It is said that if you wait until the end of the day, merchants will discount their wares substaintially before they close, because it is considered good luck to end the day with a sale. I bought a rug at the end of the day, and though I still probably paid much more than necessary, I was happy with the price in the end and still managed to bargain to 20% of the original asking price.

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  • Ljubicica's Profile Photo

    Getting lost in the medina

    by Ljubicica Written Aug 15, 2005

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    this is it...

    Wear something comfortable and get lost in the medina. You will discover so many details and real life going on: a green market, kids playing football in small streets... trully vivd. Try not to get caught by the pushy salesmen. Just move along. Have fun!

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  • nina_z's Profile Photo

    A Walk through the Medina

    by nina_z Written Aug 13, 2006

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    window at a cafe in the medina
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    The Medina in Sousse is one of the oldest in Tunis. A medina is what used to be the old town surrounded by town walls. It's the place where the traditional market is where you haggle for a deal and where you can get anything form spices to leather goods. There are also a number of beautiful traditional cafes inside the medina and a typical blue and white paint on some of the windows and gates.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Medina - Walls and Gates

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 1, 2008

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    There were originally six gates, of which two survive: Bab el Khabli on the south side and Bab el Gharbi on the west. The gate on the east side, Bab el Djedid, dates only from 1864. The walls of the Medina, which were first built by the Arabs in 859 AD extend for approx 2.25km (1.5 miles) and are 8m high and are fortified with a series of solid square turrets.

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  • kylamees's Profile Photo

    Medina markets

    by kylamees Written May 2, 2006

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    Visit medina markets, good for trading some items off 100% :)
    Buy leather, handicraft, jewels, spices, clothes. Must trade hard.
    But not only markets are worth to visit. You can find interestin quiet Old Town streets, Rabat (old castle, climb to tower for 3 din), Big Mosque, Mosaique museum.

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  • Maria81's Profile Photo

    Medina Walls

    by Maria81 Written Jan 9, 2010

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    Where?

    Right in the centre, it's close to Bab Jedid station. Walk on Ave Mohammed Ali, Boulevard Yahia ben Omar, and Ave Marechal Tito and Ave Sudon to do pretty much a full circle.

    What?

    Medina is one of the highlights of any visit to Sousse, and the first examination of it is best made by following the walls. An imposing fortification, it is almost 25 feet high and is further strengthened by a a number of square turrets.

    Old Byzantine walls stood on roughly the same line, but where replaced when Aghlabids came to the city

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  • Quartzy's Profile Photo

    Sousse's medina

    by Quartzy Written Apr 16, 2008

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    The medina in Sousse is nice. Very crowded of course, but that's to be expected. You can visit the Mosque - they'll cover you up before they let you go in if you're wearing a skirt or a tank top. Next to the entrance to the medina is a regular shop, that is with fixed prices, which can be a relief if you could use a break from all the bargaining! Like in Hammamet, the medina is not far from the beach, so you can walk on the beach to get there.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Medina

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 1, 2008

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    The Medina, situated on rising ground above the harbour in Sousse, is surrounded by a 2.25km/1.5miles circuit of walls built in 859 and renovated and strengthened in 874 and 1205. The massive blocks of dressed stone in the walls came from ancient Roman buildings. There were originally six gates, of which two survive: Bab el Khabli on the south side and Bab el Gharbi on the west. The gate on the east side, Bab el Djedid, dates only from 1864. Measuring 1km by about 500m, the Medina of Sousse is one of the finest examples of Arab architecture in Tunisia, preserved almost unchanged over the centuries. Within the walls lie some 24 mosques (12 for men and 12 for women), including the Grand Mosque, the Ribat and many souqs including stalls selling fruit and vegetables. More photo's can be found on one of my travelogues.

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Medina

    by kris-t Updated Mar 1, 2006

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    Medinas often contain historical fountains, palaces, and mosques. The monuments are preserved for their cultural significance (and are also a draw for tourists).

    Because of the very narrow streets, medinas are free from automobile traffic, and in some cases even motorcycle and bicycle traffic. The streets can be less than a meter wide. This makes them unique among highly populated urban centers.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces

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