Sousse Warnings and Dangers

  • Warnings and Dangers
    by Willettsworld
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by geordieontour
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by geordieontour

Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Sousse

  • Sousse Beach of Hotel Karawan

    by roberto99 Written Jun 23, 2013

    I did not want to leave my expensive Revue Thommen Swiss watch in the Hotelroom dornig my Beach Star,so I Tool the watch to the supervised Beach,belonging to Hotel Karawan.
    During swimming in the Sea, the watch has been stolen, definitely by one of the 4 staff members belonging to the Hotel.
    They were sitting next to my beach chair, very few other tourists around.
    Therefore warning to everybody,beware of theft in this aerea.

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  • Dizzyhead's Profile Photo

    Selling sex.

    by Dizzyhead Written Dec 27, 2012

    When I was in a bar close to the beach in Sousse, I sat in a openbar and many people were there. But I noticed that there were many older men, foreign men and younger Tunisian men. I did not pay so much attention to that, because there were also other kind of people around, but not so many. I was sitting and writing and I have spent some time there drinking both beers and coffee, so I noticed that the same people kind of people were there. And durig this time a younger boy/man tries to flirt with me and get me to a hotel room, and I told him it is harma (bad) on Arabic. I said I was not interested and he left after a while. But after some hours I talked to a salesman who lived in Sweden and he confirmed what I thought, that this was a place where older foreign men came and bought love from poor young Tunisian men. Sad, but true.

    Related to:
    • Gay and Lesbian
    • Singles

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  • BarryBraund's Profile Photo

    "I will show you the way"

    by BarryBraund Written Jul 15, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I apologise for repeating what has been said. It is a fact that, if you stand around looking lost, someone looking very credible will come up to you and offer to show you the way to the area or shop that you are trying to find. After following your new found friend for 10 or 20 minutes, you are strangely introduced to an alternative supplier of rugs, pottery, silverware who (presumably) is your new friend's 'associate'. Sadly, I fell for this routine twice, once in Sousse and secondly in Tunis. Same result, lost and more frusrated. Friendly as the locals are, when you are in the soukke districts, beware!

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  • Andrew_W_K's Profile Photo

    Driving and road awareness

    by Andrew_W_K Written Dec 25, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Unless you are a very experienced driver who has driven outside of Europe and north America don't even consider hiring a car and driving in Tunisia. The driving is chaotic but they understand the rules. I spent a day in a taxi and couldn't figure out who had right of way at intersections and roundabouts. Also be very, very vigilant when out walking. We witnessed the horror of two German tourists being hit by car. They were walking on the sidewalk in the middle of the afternoon in a built up area and a Libyan man lost control of his car, mounted the kerb and slammed into a wall taking the Germans with him. Tragically they died despite efforts by paramedics at the scene. I cannot stress enough how careful you need to be especially if you come from somewhere where high driving standards are the norm. The other worrying thing is that many cars drive at night without lights and crossing a busy road is made all the more dangerous. I'm not usually one to sound alarms over things like traffic but when you see people die on holiday it makes you realise how we take things like road safety for granted.

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  • Andrew_W_K's Profile Photo

    Petty Crime

    by Andrew_W_K Written Dec 25, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sadly there is a lot of petty crime in Sousse. One man tried to rob me on the beach. He thrust some nuts in my hand and said try them and then said buy a packet. I got a handful of coins out of my pocket and he snatched them from me and dropped them in the sand then pretended to put them in my pocket but didn't. I threatened him and he gave me most of them back but walked away with about 4 times the value of the packet of nuts. I told the hotel reception staff to warn other guests and they went ballistic and sent their security guard down the beach to find him. When they did they confiscated all the cigarettes and other goods he was trying to sell. They said it's a big problem and gives Sousse a bad name. Pickpockets also operate in the Medina and Souks. Taxi drivers are also known for lying about the fare so fix the price beforehand.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Medina

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 1, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Take care within the Medina by the souvenir shops as they can be quite intimidating and get out into the less busy alleyways and witness the daily life that goes on. Also make sure you have a map with you as you will get lost! Most of the alleys and passageways have their names in both Arabic and French so it shouldn't be hard to find where you are and where you want to go but if you do get lost then simply ask someone or try and head back to the Great Mosque and get your bearings there.

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  • geordieontour's Profile Photo

    Dont get caught out !!!!!

    by geordieontour Updated Mar 13, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Whilst walking the medina I always say I wont get caught out, guess what, I Did
    Whilst admiring the large mosque in the medina , a polite local speaks in perfect english, that the local mosque around the corner , is open and he would direct us the mosque free of charge on the way he points out various spots, on reaching the mosque he says can you make a small donation to the mosque (fair enough) after a quick tour and a couple of photographs you realise you are in a enclosed area and not sure how to get out, he then demands 10 dinars each for myself and wife and 10 dinars for himself, which is roughly £12

    Decided to pay up and get to open space and safety, this is what is spoiling a wonderful country , once caught twice sly!!!!!!

    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • Family Travel

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  • geordieontour's Profile Photo

    Dodgey beach area

    by geordieontour Updated Mar 13, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    watch out they hunt in pairs, whilst on the beach walking enjoying the sun, first person asks you to buy nuts, cigarettes etc, polite no thank you in english, he them shouts down the beach (English) the next guy then tries to get you to exchange english notes back into dinar,

    Just be polite and a firm NO!!!! thank you , should be alright.

    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • Family Travel

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  • brazwhazz's Profile Photo

    Sousse's "red light" district

    by brazwhazz Written Oct 24, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Near the gate on the west side of the medina (Bab el-Gharbi) is Sousse's prostitution district.

    After climbing the steps from Souq el-Caid, we turned right to stay in the medina instead of walking through Bab el-Gharbi outside the old city walls. Almost immediately, locals started screaming at us and gesturing to us to go back. Of course, this made us only more curious about what the heck they were trying to keep us away from.

    A few steps later, we saw the somewhat comical truth: we had wandered into Sousse's "red light" district. We also realized that the gestures were aimed mainly at the female half of our tandem...

    Therefore we recommend women stay away from this part of town!

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  • adonai_2012's Profile Photo

    money money money

    by adonai_2012 Written Sep 29, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You have to keep your eyes opened and also on your back whenever you deal with finansial issues in Sousse.

    -even when changing money in hotel you have to know exaclty how much you need to get as, it is not impossible that they wil try to keep some dinars for themselves

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  • miman's Profile Photo

    Jellyfish

    by miman Written Jul 20, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Jellyfish have soft bodies and long, stinging, poisonous tentacles that they use to catch fish. A jellyfish is 98% water. Most jellyfish have tentacles or oral arms coated with thousands of microscopic nematocysts; generally, each of these nematocyst has a "trigger" paired with a capsule containing a coiled stinging filament, as well as barbs on the exterior. There are three goals of first aid for uncomplicated jellyfish stings: prevent injury to rescuers, inactivate the nematocysts, and remove any tentacles stuck on the patient. To prevent injury to rescuers, barrier clothing should be worn. Five percent acetic acid solution (white vinegar) is the preferred method, although meat tenderizer, or sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) will neutralize any nematocysts that have not yet discharged into the skin. Meat tenderizer should not be left on the skin for more than 15 minutes, and none of these substances should be used in the eyes. In the case of stings on or around the eyes, the solution may be placed on a towel and dabbed around the eyes, but not in them. Salt water may also be used in case any of these compounds are not readily available, but fresh water should never be used. Rinsing the sting site with fresh water, rubbing the wound, or using alcohol, spirits, ammonia, or urine will encourage the release of venom. Once deactivated, the stinging cells must be removed. First aid providers should be careful to use gloves or another readily available barrier device to prevent personal injury, and to follow standard universal precautions. After large pieces of the jellyfish are removed, shaving cream may be applied to the area and a knife edge, safety razor, or credit card may be used to take away any remaining nematocysts.
    Beyond initial first aid, antihistamines such as diphenhydramine may be used to control skin irritation .

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  • ianerin's Profile Photo

    Money

    by ianerin Written Apr 20, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ok, this confession is going to make me look like an idiot, and that's fair enough, but it may be useful to someone. The Tunisian money is the Dinar, and it is tied strictly to the Euro. Most of the dinar you will handle will be in coin form, as things are pretty inexpensive compared to western countries. However, one must note that one dinar also = 1,000 dinar. Therefore, when you go to a store and buy, say, a bottle of water, the register might report the numbers 600. This (as I was too slow to figure out the first time) is 600 or .60 cents, not 6 dinar. (in my defense, I had just arrived in the country, hungover and didn't get around the figuring out what the exhange rate was). That shopkeeper got quite a tip, and let me tell you that they won't point out these things.

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  • ianerin's Profile Photo

    Food

    by ianerin Written Apr 20, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Though you can get great food in Tunisia, you will usually have to pay for it in a place like Sousse. For cheaper foods, its all about the mixed grill, and their specialty - the Flank Steak. I can't say I would recomend or not recommend this dish, wish is bascially a thin slice of steak, breaded and usually a little pink on the inside. I will say that I would carefully consider the establishment from which you are thinking of eating the flank steak at, and proceed accordingly.

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  • whitecliff62's Profile Photo

    SAND IN YOUR EARS AND UP YOUR A#SE

    by whitecliff62 Updated Jan 10, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    WE PLOUGH THE FIELDS AND SCATTER

    The beaches in Sousse are some of the best to be found anywhere on the med, but with this comes a few problems because in the afternoons the wind begins to pick up and because the sand is so fine it has a tentancy to get into those very small places that the sun hardly ever sees hahahahaha. Also if you have to sun bathe make sure you are not wet coz when the sand blwes all over you you will end up looking like a sugared dough nut hahahahaha. The bloke in the photo is actually ploughing the sand, god knows why, he ain't never going to grow dates on the beach hahahahaha.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Desert
    • Beaches

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  • Nuga's Profile Photo

    Fake Amethyst

    by Nuga Written Jun 27, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When you go on the Safari it is great but beware of fake Amethyst. They generally have quartz crystal which is real, but I guess they have found a way to make extra money coloring the quartz crystal with a violet substance that makes the quartz look like Amethyst.
    I was very suspicious about Amethyst being sold for 50 dinar which I liked a big piece but I said I only had ten deniar pointed to the one I liked ignoring what ever price was offered kept on saying ten ten ten until sold for ten found it a bit hard to believe
    When I got back to the hotel noticed that the Amethyst color was running off on my hands placed it in water and all the water became violet be aware. They are sold at the stops near the salt sea and in and around the Sahara stops of the Safari tour.

    Related to:
    • Safari
    • Budget Travel
    • Road Trip

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Sousse Warnings and Dangers

Reviews and photos of Sousse warnings and dangers posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Sousse sightseeing.

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