Fun things to do in Zimbabwe

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    Bungy!
    by PierreZA
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    Balancing Rocks.
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Zimbabwe

  • kharmencita's Profile Photo

    The Smoky Falls named Victoria

    by kharmencita Updated Jan 1, 2013

    At last here I came to one of these most wonderful World of Nature, This is the highest Highlight of our Travel in Zimbabwe. Named in honor of the Queen Victoria of England, it was discovered by David Livingstone, a pioneer Scottish medical Missionary explorer of Africa. Located on the highlands of the Zambezi River, the most spectacular moments that makes the waterfalls very attractive and fascinating is during the flood seasons from February to April when the waterfalls produce the largest and greatest sheets of impressive, smoky Cascades with a width of 1.7 km and a height of 108 meters that falls with a roaring thundering sound to the ground. This wonderful majestic show of natural phenomena can be seen on both sides of the countries of Zambia and Zimbabwe. For this reason it became one of the 7 natural wonders of the World.
    Although it was a dry season when we visited in November but there were still parts of the Gorges displaying large amount of waterfalls. For me, it was great chance to see the contrast between Water and the Rock formation as shown in my pictures. This unique opportunity to walk and explore right on top of the dry River bed was a great chance and unforgettable experience for us. Just the thought of imagining how terrifying could it be if someone falls accidentally down deeply on to the foot of the Gorge. Carefulness and awareness are the absolute priorities!
    The Waterfalls premises became attractive for outdoor activities with Adrenalin kicks. Some of them include Bungee Jumping which is famous at the Victoria Falls Bridge Helicopter rides, white water raft through Zambezi rapids, tandem sky diving, kayaking and micro light flying over Victoria Falls, Canoeing on the upper Zambezi River, or horseback riding. Hotels are available nearby and camping grounds. We stayed at Maramba River Lodge Campsite which is the closest to the Victoria falls.

    smoky cascades the smoke that thunders the edge of the Devils Pool smoke-liked vapors a Natures Paradise:Vic Falls
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • DAO's Profile Photo

    THE SINK EXPERIMENT

    by DAO Updated Oct 29, 2011

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    What is the sink Experiment? Scientifically water going down a sink will rotate counter clockwise in the northern hemisphere and clockwise in the southern hemisphere. I set out to conduct this experiment for Virtual Tourist here in Zimbabwe, which is in the Southern hemisphere. This is due to the Coriolis Effect, a force caused by the rotation of the Earth. Guess what? IT’s A MYTH! I found that I could get the water to go in either direction just by diverting the water slightly. Often it ran in the ‘wrong’ direction. Don’t believe it? Come for a visit and try it for yourself!

    ZIMBABWE
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  • DAO's Profile Photo

    DAY VISAS AT VISTORIA FALLS

    by DAO Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    *** THIS IS AN ANSWER TO A TRAVEL FORUM QUESTION ***

    Vias fees go by Nationality on the border at Vistoria Falls. A UK passport is less than a USA one for example. Then it gets interesting. Only at Victoria Falls does Zimbabwe offer a cheaper 1 day visa. Zambia works the same.

    The Zambia "Day Tripper" costs £20
    http://www.zambiaimmigration.gov.zm/zims/VISA_FEES.aspx

    Zimbabwe offers a day visa as well, but does not advertise this on their websites.

    Just in case I was in Zimbabwe with a single entry visa, went into Zambia then walked past the always crowded Zimbabwe post just in case when I returned. They don't pay attention.

    If you stay on the Zambia side you will have to pay Zimbabwe $20-$30 max plus $25 to get into the park.

    All figures in US Dollars. Photo no. 5 is the Zimbabwe Border Post

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Sailing and Boating

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  • georeiser's Profile Photo

    Baboons along the road

    by georeiser Written Oct 22, 2009

    The 70 km road from Kazungula border to Victoria Falls is inside a national park. A lot of baboons were sitting along the road. When the taxi stopped, they all ran up away, and some of them climbed up in the trees.

    Baboons along the road Baboons along the road Baboons along the road Baboons along the road Baboons along the road
    Related to:
    • Safari
    • Adventure Travel
    • Road Trip

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  • DAO's Profile Photo

    IS IT SAFE?

    by DAO Updated Jan 18, 2009

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    This question comes up a lot on the travel forums here on VT. Zimbabwe is safe for Tourists. Not 100%, but no where is. Zimbabwe is a failed economy and there are many bad stories in the news about the poverty and sometimes violence. These issues do not affect Tourists. Yes, there is more property crime so keep an eye on your bags at all times. Tourist areas like Victoria Falls National Park are well controlled. The local people are extremely friendly.

    So what are the problems? You cannot rely on things like fuel here. You can drive here, but only a few companies will allow you to take a car into Zimbabwe. You cannot trust the money and/or banks. The Government has a policy of giving you exchange rates that are 25% of what you can get from some travel agents. Try never to have Zim money if you can avoid it. Food can be hard to find so bring some tinned food if you are travelling here for a while. Never exchange money on the streets. It’s illegal and you would be easy to spot doing so. Only drive a car full of fuel from another country. You won’t get any here. The most important thing? Never discuss Politics. I never heard a political discussion except behind closed doors in someone’s house. It’s not worth the hassle.

    What can you do? There are still bus companies that transit through Zimbabwe. Many tourist areas are near other countries borders. Plenty of tour companies still operate here. The crowing glory is the Zimbabwe side of Victoria Falls. You can walk over from Zambia and even stay a few nights in a hotel on the Zim side. Probably a bit cheaper and certainly less crowded.

    If you want to come here, do so and plan carefully. That’s all you have to do and Zimbabweans will appreciate your contribution to their economy.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Road Trip
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  • John195123's Profile Photo

    Victoria Falls

    by John195123 Updated Mar 17, 2008

    You can visit Victoria Falls of the Zambezi River from both the Zambia and Zimbabwe sides, both of which offer distinct views of different parts. Devil's Cataract, for example, is best viewed from Zimbabwe.

    "The Smoke that Thunders" is an amazing place for geology- if you trace the history of the falls back over the millenia, you'll see that it is just the newest incarnation of the falls, which, from its base, zig zags downstream through the previous locations of the falls that existed long before Dr. Livingstone came across the falls in 1855, long before even the Kololo and other tribes even existed.

    Stretching for almost one mile, Mosi-oa-Tunya, as the locals call it, when flowing at full capacity, drops a little under 550 million (I've also heard 550,000) cubic meters per minute onto the rocks over 100 meters below, making it the largest sheet of water in the world.

    Once you cross the border into Zimbabwe, it's only 100 meters or so to the park entrance. You can stay in Livingstone, Zambia and come over for a day trip, crossing the bridge on foot if you want, though that may be about a 1 or 2 kilometer walk. The entrance fee may be about $20 USD. If you are coming from Zimbabwe, the entrance is just 100 meters before the border. You can park on either side of the border post and walk in- that seems to be the common way to do it, especially for the visitors from Zambia- that way you don't have to pay the carbon tax and so on.

    There aren't always the railings here that you find in Zambia, only thorn bushes to keep you back from the edge.

    Vic Falls
    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • National/State Park
    • Photography

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  • DAO's Profile Photo

    TAKE SOME SCHOOL PICTURES

    by DAO Written Mar 9, 2008

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    This is Ms. Madzore’s class from Mbizo, Zimbabwe visiting Victoria Falls. Across Africa you will see school trips visiting the natural and historic wonders of their own country. A great thing. What they often do not have is a camera to record the event. One of the students watched me taking pictures and realised my camera had a digital screen. She asked me to take the class picture and they all had a good look at the result. Usually that’s the end of it. I asked Ms. Madzore if she would like me to email her the pictures. As soon as I said it I realised the problem. So, I took her details, printed the photos at home and posted them on to here. The cost to me? A few dollars of prints. For the class – priceless.

    So if you see a school group, why not adopt them and print up some photos they can cherish forever.

    If you would like to send a donation of supplies, please send it to the address below:

    Ms. Patricia Madzore
    Emthonjeni P. School
    PO Box 30
    Mbizo
    Kwekwe
    Zimbabwe

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • School Holidays
    • Photography

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  • nartjies's Profile Photo

    Victoria Falls in the Rain!

    by nartjies Written Feb 19, 2008

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    I can't believe that I border the country of Zimbabwe and this was the first time I saw the Vic Falls... It truely is one of the wonders of the world and is beyond expectation!!! The landscape around the water falls is untouched, completely natural, we actually saw a wild buck while walking around the falls. And since it was raining my tekkies got soaked in wild red berries!
    Even though we didn't do the water sports due to the weather, just running with the rain and the spray of the falls was a mighty experience!:)

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  • DAO's Profile Photo

    GO BUNGEE JUMPING OVER THE FALLS!

    by DAO Updated Dec 12, 2007

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    You don't have to be crazy to do this, but you will enjoy it more if you are. These guys are located in the ‘No Man’s Land’ between Zambia and Zimbabwe. The pictures are of a friend of mine who took the plunge and enjoyed it once he realise he would actually live. The 111 metre (364 feet) is advertised as 100% safe and there have been over 50,000 jumpers. Sounds like good business. It’s certainly scenic and you do get pictures of your jump included in the price. I just hope your pictures come out better than these! You can book in advance or just so and make arrangements with them. Just about any tour agent on either side will sell you a time slot.

    Have a blast!

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    • Bungy Jumping
    • National/State Park
    • Adventure Travel

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  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    World Heritage Sites - Mana Pools

    by MikeAtSea Written Oct 22, 2006

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    On the banks of the Zambezi, great cliffs overhang the river and the floodplains. The area is home to a remarkable concentration of wild animals, including elephants, buffalo, leopards and cheetahs. An important concentration of Nile crocodiles is also be found in the area.
    Private and gouvernement camps can be found here, as are canoe tours along the mighty Zambezi River.

    The residents of Mana Pools
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    • Eco-Tourism
    • Photography
    • National/State Park

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  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    World Heritage Sites - Matobo Hills

    by MikeAtSea Written Oct 22, 2006

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    The area exhibits a profusion of distinctive rock landforms rising above the granite shield that covers much of Zimbabwe. The large boulders provide abundant natural shelters and have been associated with human occupation from the early Stone Age right through to early historical times, and intermittently since. They also feature an outstanding collection of rock paintings. The Matobo Hills continue to provide a strong focus for the local community, which still uses shrines and sacred places closely linked to traditional, social and economic activities.
    Cecil John Rhodes the famous pioneer and "founder" of Rhodesia is also buried here.

    The hills of Matabeleland
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
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  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    World Heritage Sites - Great Zimbabwe

    by MikeAtSea Written Oct 22, 2006

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    The ruins of Great Zimbabwe – the capital of the Queen of Sheba, according to an age-old legend – are a unique testimony to the Bantu civilization of the Shona between the 11th and 15th centuries. The city, which covers an area of nearly 80 ha, was an important trading centre and was renowned from the Middle Ages onwards.
    Many sculptures were found here and there is a certain myths surrounding these ruins as to the origin and the story behind them.
    On all occassions of my visits I found it exciting to stroll around the almost 900 years old stone ruins - a sight that is not to be missed when visiting Zimbabwe.

    One of the most magnificent monuments
    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    Hwange National Park

    by MikeAtSea Written Oct 4, 2006

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    The Hwange Wildlife area is a 280km large area of land which includes the Hwange National Park, the remote Kazuma Pan National Park, three safari hunting areas and two indigenous forests. The area of Hwange was historically important for it's extensive reserves of coal, and a good amount is still mined here.
    For this reason, the abandoned Cape to Cairo railway was routed through Hwange and Victoria Falls instead of through Harare.
    The wildlife area and National Park were actually only set aside due to their poor soil quality making the land unsuitable for agriculture. When the designation was made in 1929, the area was almost devoid of animal and birdlife due to seriously overenthusiastic hunting practices. Nowadays the Park is a rich habitat for many rare and fascinating species including giraffe, sable antelope, buffalo, impala, kudu, zebra, elephant, lion, leopard, cheetah, hyena, wild dog and jackal. The Park is also home to over 400 bird species including numerous eagle species, kestrels, goshawk, falcons, buzzards and osprey. There are over 1000 species of tree and shrub, presenting a great variety of habitat and scenery.
    Currently due to the political instability in the country certain infrastructure such as camps, petrol stations are not operational. Hunting in those areas has also been reported.

    Sunset at Hwange Map of Hwange and Western Zimbabwe
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  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    Victoria Falls

    by MikeAtSea Written Oct 4, 2006

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    These spectacular waterfalls are a designated World Heritage Site as well as being one of the natural wonders of the world. Ever since their existence was publicized by David Livingstone in 1855, visitors have traveled from all over the world to witness this amazing natural phenomenon. The falls are 1.7 km wide and have an average height of 100m.
    The volume of water passing over the falls is 550,000 square meters per minute on average, although this can increase dramatically during the high water period between March and May. The geology of this area is fascinating, the original falls were actually 8km downstream of the present ones. Erosion over millions of years, combined with weaknesses in the basalt rock perpendicular to the flow of the Zambezi have gradually worn away the previous seven sets of falls and have led to the magnificent gorge system that visitors see today.

    The smoke that thunders
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    • Eco-Tourism
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    • National/State Park

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  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    Lake Kariba

    by MikeAtSea Written Oct 4, 2006

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    Lake Kariba is the result of a massive damming project undertaken in 1958 to flood an area of the Zambezi Valley in order to create a hydroelectric power plant for Zimbabwe and Zambia. Many hundreds of local people were displaced in order to flood the valley, and many animals were relocated in the months before the floodgates finally opened. The lake is 282km long, and the dam is 24m thick at its base.
    The Lake itself is a popular destination for fishing, boating, game watching and relaxing. Many visitors take a house boat with a crew and drift off to explore the many secluded inlets and islands which are home to a good variety of animal and bird life, as well as 42 species of fish. The fishing is excellent with opportunity to catch tiger fish, bream, carp and black bass. Many hippos make the lake their home, as well as crocodiles, and the Matusodona National Park, Chete and Charara Safari Areas on the shores of the lake offer a great opportunity to see some of the larger of Zimbabwe's game animals such as elephant and buffalo.

    The Dam Wall
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    • National/State Park
    • Adventure Travel
    • Water Sports

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Zimbabwe Hotels

See all 49 Hotels in Zimbabwe
  • Imbabala Safari Lodge

    Zambezi River, 80 km from Victoria Falls, Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Solo

  • Meikles Hotel

    Corner 3rd Street/Jason Moyo Avenue, Harare, Zimbabwe

    Satisfaction: Very Good

    Good for: Solo

    Hotel Class 5 out of 5 stars

  • Holiday Inn Bulawayo (Milnerton Avenue )

    service was allright rooms are very basic, clean but a little used the restaurant was a posivtive...

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