Antarctica Things to Do

  • Romantic walk
    Romantic walk
    by darrmont
  • Things to Do
    by MikeySoft
  • Things to Do
    by MikeySoft

Antarctica Things to Do

  • Antarctic Peninsula the warm North

    The Antarctic Peninsula is the northernmost part of the mainland of Antarctica and is the spot where most tourist go to visit the VERY deep South. They have many of the main bases in Antarctica on the Peninsula or on the Islands just off the peninsula or last count about 42 bases located here . This was my stepping of point and I flew from Chile to...

    more
  • McMurdo Station

    See my travelogues for official Navy photos of the station and see how the men lived while serving their one year tour...through 6 months of daylight and then 6 months of darkness. Those were the days before women and tourists could visit Antarctica. In fact, my husband was there when they installed the first nuclear power plant so they could have...

    more
  • Now we sail around Cape Horn..

    It takes two more days to cross the Drake passage northwards, from Deception Island, though once more the sea gods were kind to us - no shakes on the Drake for us. The days were spent reading, more lectures and films, editing photos (so many photos!). Punctuated of course by the opportunity to partake of excellence of the provender provided by the...

    more
  • Red Penguins and a Grey Crater - Telefon...

    The calm waters of Port Foster spread out beyond Neptune's Bellows and Whaler's Bay. The flooded caldera, measuring about 10 by 7 km is one of the safest in Antarctica. Famed novelist Jules Verne is reputed to have based the secret hidden southern base of Captain Nemo. The MS Expedition cruised to Telefon Bay (named for French ship, the SS Telefon...

    more
  • Penguin Armageddon at Bailey Head

    Bailey Head is a rugged headland on the southeastern coast of Deception Island, a volcanic caldera just south of the main South Shetland Island chain.This was to be out last port of call in the Antarctic, and it was a spectacular finale indeed. A landing had been planned on the long black sand beach which extends to the east of the basalt cliffs of...

    more
  • Cruise through Neptune's Bellows

    The channel through the caldera wall of Deception Island is just 230m wide. And in the middle of the channel is hazardous Ravn Rock (as the remains of a Norwegian Whaling ship on the beach of the western headland can no doubt testify!). Our entry to the calm waters of Port Foster, on a glowering cloudy morning was via zodiac (we left the MS...

    more
  • Whales and Icebergs - Cierva Cove

    Lying 11 km southeast of Cape Sterneck in Hughes Bay, just south of Chavdar Peninsula along the west coast of Graham Land, Antarctica, Cierva Cove is an open bay which is renowned for accumulating icebergs, either blown in on the winds from Gerlache Strait, or calving off the massive ice face at the rear of the cove. There is a small Argentine...

    more
  • D'Hainaut Island

    D'Hainaut island lies in the middle of Mikkelson Harbour, on the south coast of Trinity Island, one of the northernmost of the Palmer Archipelago. We had arrived here from Cierva Cove, after a short cruise. At the landing site, the skeletal remains of many whales lay on the beach, surrounding the wooden skeleton of a whaleboat. The island is named...

    more
  • A touch of Paradise Harbour

    There was a quick rush back to the MS Expedition after the landing on Petermann Island, as winds began to rise, and the brief morning clear disappeared, replaced by strong winds and choppy seas. Time to skedaddle north again to calmer waters. And a wild ride it was, through brash ice in the Lemaire Channel, and subject to a Force 9 Gale. Calmer...

    more
  • Spectacular Narrow Passage - The Lemaire...

    Lemaire Channel is one of the highlights of any Antarctic Cruise. It is a narrow channel between Kiev Peninsula on the mainland's Graham Land and Booth Island. Steep cliffs, rising to over 500 metres, with precipitous valley glaciers, hem in the often iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 metres wide at its narrowest point. At...

    more
  • Statuesque Guardians

    The basalt spires of Una's Peaks (more colloquially known as Una's T1ts) were formerly known as the Cape Reynard Towers. Each is topped with a small ice cap. The tallest (747m) was first climbed in 1999 (and not since!)Anyone on an Antarctic Peninsula cruise through the Lemaire Channel with see these prominent guardians at its northern portal.Their...

    more
  • Petermann Island - Gentoo and Adelie...

    Petermann Island is a small island, about 2 km by 1 km, off the northwest coast of Kiev Peninsula in Graham Land, Antarctica, just south of Booth Island and the Lemaire Channel. It is a popular tourist destination fro Antarctic Peninsula cruises.The island rises steeply from rocky beaches to basalt ridges up to 250m in height. The rocks are cracked...

    more
  • Cross the Antarctic Circle.

    Our cruise was dubbed 'Quest for the Antarctic Circle' and we did achieve that goal. This was despite the trip being shortened by a day due to the late arrival in Ushuaia of the MS Expedition, which experienced engine trouble.We crossed the circle at 1 am on 14 February, in darkness, but with plenty of champagne to toast the occasion. It is said...

    more
  • Crystal Sound

    Forging south to the Antarctic Circle, the next significant body of water our cruise traversed was the incomparable Crystal Sound, which extends to the south of Grandidier Channel. It is deemed to lie between the southern part of the Biscoe Islands and the coast of Graham Land, as far north as Cape Evensen and Cape Leblond and south southern to...

    more
  • Grandidier Channel - the smooth way...

    Leaving the cliffs of Lemaire Channel, the MS Expedition entered the wide smooth and ice speckled waters of the Grandidier Channel, the spectacular inside passage down the Antarctic Peninsula. Whilst on the map, navigation looks simple, there are many small islands and hidden rocks and shoals to keep the navigators busy. It extends from the south...

    more
  • Gerlache Strait - Antarctic Peninsula...

    The broad open waters of the Gerlache Strait separate the islands of the Palmer Archipelago (Anvers and Brabant Islands, and many smaller ones) from the glaciated plateaus and steep cliffs of the Antarctic peninsula. Most cruise ships will pass through it in either direction during their brief sojourns in the Antarctic.Our cruise in February 2015...

    more
  • Danco Island - Camping in the Antarctic

    Danco Island is small and steep, with a shallow rocky beach, snow slopes and a penguin colony up the hill.This was the site chosen to allow those on the MS Expedition who had paid the extra $295 to participate to camp out in the Antarctic.If you choose your cruise, and it includes the camping option, do make sure that you book early. Just 60 places...

    more
  • Drake, Rattle and Roll

    The Drake Passage is the feared body of water which confronts travellers to Antarctica as they leave the sheltered waters of the Beagle Channel and head south across 800 km of open ocean, between the southern tip of South America at Cape Horn, and the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica. It is where the waters of the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean...

    more
  • Rongé Island - Penguin Watching

    Rongé Island (aka Curville Island or De Rongé Island or Isla Curville or Rouge Island) is a steep, rugged island, rising to 1100m at Mt Brittania. It is largest island of a group which forms the west side of Errera Channel, off the west coast of Graham Land on the Antarctic Peninsula mainland. The Belgian Antarctic Expedition (1897–1899) under...

    more
  • Melchior Islands - Icebergs and Whales

    The Melchior Islands are small, low and ice covered, with impressive ice cliffs. They are part of the Palmer Archipelago, and are located near the centre of Dallman Bay, between the larger Brabant and Adelaide Islands. These were our first sightings of the 7th continent (or at least its outlying regions!), so despite grey skies and a flat grey sea,...

    more
  • Kayking in Curtiss Bay

    Kayaking in the Antarctic is a fantastic experience. You get to see everything from a totally diferent angle and can get up close to various wildlife. Not all ships heading to the Antarctic offer kayaking. The smaller expedition ships do. It is expensive but worth every dollar.Special clothing is required. The outer 'Dryskin' suit was supplied by...

    more
  • Neko Harbour

    Neko Harbor is an inlet on the Antarctic Peninsula on Andvord Bay, situated on the west coast of Graham Land. Neko Harbor was discovered by Belgian explorer Adrien de Gerlache in the early 20th century. It was named for a Scottish whaling boat, the Neko, which operated in the area between 1911 and 1924.(Wikipedia).This one of the most popular...

    more
  • Wilhelmina Bay

    Named after Wilhelmina, Queen of the Netherlands, this bay is located between Reclus Peninslua and Cape Anna on the west coast of Graham Land on the Antarctic Peninsula. It was discovered in the late 1800's by Belgian explorer Adrien de Gerlache.Wilhelmina Bay is 24 km wide and is a popular destination for toruist ships because of frequent...

    more
  • Kayaking in Neko Harbour

    Neko Harbor was named after a Scottish whaling boat which operated in the area between 1911-24.It is a popular Antarctic landing site because it is sheltered from most of the elements. Because of this it is also a great place for a kayak. We were especially warned about getting close to the terminus of a glacier in case of a calving event....

    more
  • Antarctic Sound

    Antarctic Sound is a body of water about 30 miles (50 km) long and from 7 to 12 miles (11 to 19 km) wide, separating the Joinville Island group from the northeast end of the Antarctic Peninsula. The sound was named by the Swedish Antarctic Expedition under Otto Nordenskiöld for the expedition ship Antarctic which in 1902, under the command of Carl...

    more
  • Sunrise in Antarctic Sound

    Antarctic Sound is the body of water separating the mainland Antarctic Peninsula from the surrounding Joinvlle Islands. Access is limited severely by season and the class of ship.We were lucky to have been aboard an ice strengthened vessel at the beginning of the summer season.Sunrise was about 2am and we had a wake-up call at about 2.30 to tell us...

    more
  • Petermann Island

    We did not go far since our sixth excursion was only 4 miles away at Petermann Island (@ 65°10'34.22"S ; 64° 8'9.69"W). Having moderate winds, only a few of us selected to kayak, navigating the leeward side of the island for half the time. The other half was on the island, watching the copious gentoo penguins, with their molting adolescents and...

    more
  • Horseshoe Island

    On day five, our first excursion was Horseshoe Island (@ 67°48'38.18"S ; 67°17'39.97"W). Hoping to kayak, the winds were too high. But the zodiac landing on the rocks went smooth enough. The old British hut was preserved as if it was left in 1956, complete with food tins on the shelves and board games on the tables. Filing in 10 at a time, we could...

    more
  • Vernadsky Station and Wordie Hut

    Day eight thankfully saw improving weather and allowed us to see all our excursions. The fifth excursion was to Vernadsky Station (@ 65°14'44.09"S ; 64°15'26.55"W) and Wordie Hut (@ 65°15'3.97"S ; 64°15'12.92"W). The former being a Ukrainian research station and the later being an old British hut during the days of geological surveys. The Ukranians...

    more
  • Danco Island

    Our eighth excursion to Danco Island (@ 64°43'45.08"S ; 62°36'1.67"W) will be long remembered, if not for the plentiful penguins, at least for the playful and breaching minke whale. As he was swimming towards us, breaking habit for most minkes, he was out in open water, exposing himself and breaching to the sky. Not once, but many times. Not sure...

    more
  • Penguin Island

    Later on, our twelfth and final outing was cancelled due to winds and sea conditions. Hoping to land at one of the northern most islands, Penguin Island (@ 62° 6'5.64"S ; 57°56'28.43"W), wind gusts and waves would have prevented the zodiacs from safely plopping us on land. The red volcanic island and the nearby glacier capped King George were...

    more
  • King George Island - Maxwell Bay

    All during the night and the first half of the eleventh morning, we were sailing from the main Antarctic Peninsula to the more hospitable and thriving islands of King George. Our eleventh outing was just that, landing our zodiacs in Maxwell Bay (@ 62°11'79.75"S ; 58°57'37.23"W), at the foot of Russia’s Bellingshausen Station. They had promised to...

    more
  • Wilhelmina Bay

    On the way to our tenth excursion, Wilhelmina Bay (@ 64°39'40.51"S ; 62° 5'43.66"W), we passed a small Chilean (AF) base. There was no sign of human life in the half dozen buildings, but the base did seem to be overrun by thousands of penguins.Wilhelmina Bay is supposed to be a whale paradise and feeding point. No beaches available mean that all...

    more
  • Brown Base

    The tenth day saw the ninth excursion to Paradise point cancelled due to winds and sea conditions. But thankfully the skies calmed just enough for our first official ‘continental’ landing at Brown Base (@ 64°53'43.18"S ; 62°52'6.79"W). The short stop was just long enough to walk 10 minutes to the crest of a small hill for a photo opportunity and...

    more
  • Lemaire Channel and Gerlache Straight

    Day nine was thankfully warmer and drier. After leaving the Argentine Island Archipelago, our northward course took us through the Lemaire Channel and Gerlache Straight (@ 65° 5'51.68"S ; 63°58'37.81"W), ending at Danco Island. Swells, waves and snow made the Lemaire Channel a bit more mysterious than dramatic as its Kodak Point nickname implies....

    more
  • Prospect Point

    Day seven was spent almost entirely on the boat. Moving northbound, our fourth excursion destination was Prospect Point (@ 65°55'25.90"S ; 64°57'9.77"W). Due to extremely overcast weather, choppy seas and 15knot winds, not only was kayaking cancelled, but the zodiacs could not make shore. We wound up cruising on the zodiacs around the ice watching...

    more
  • Detaille Island

    On day six, our third excursion was to be at Detaille Island (@ 66°53'6.83"S ; 66°39'8.55"W). From our current position, we would have to round Adelaide Island (the inner channel was filled with ice), pass the Antarctic Circle northbound and then turn back into the bay passing the circle for the third time. We feared we may have had to cancel and...

    more
  • Stonington Island

    Sailing to our second excursion, Stonington Island (@ 68°11'2.61"S ; 66°59'57.11"W) we pushed down further south than the captain and crew had ever been, down to 68° 12.815′ S! Kayaking south of 68° must be a rare opportunity, particularly in calm seas and under a blue sky. For about an hour we paddled through the brash ice and small bergs,...

    more
  • CRABEATER SEALS

    Crabeater Seals eat Krill, not crabs. It kind of helps that there really aren’t any crabs down here. Different theories around a mistranslation of the Norwegian word ‘Krill’ account for the name of this amazingly interesting mammal. They live almost exclusively here in Antarctica, have massive numbers, can swim up to 25 kmh and are the largest...

    more
  • Keep the Camera Out Even When Leaving

    The photo opportunities continue even as you leave Antarctica. You take so many pictures that you feel "done". However, eat early and head forward on the cruise ship to enjoy the sunset opportunites. Remember that the ship will be at 20 knots, so dress warmly and be prepared for a stiff breeze. This is a great opportunity to use the zoom lens. It...

    more
  • Penguins Abound

    When we boarded the Veendam for the Antarctic cruise, question number one was will we see penguins. We had no idea. The scientists told us that six of the world's 18 species of penguins can be found in Antarctica, with an estimated population approaching 20 million breeding pairs. Get close to floating ice and yiu'll probably see a penguin or two...

    more
  • Man 's Presence on the Continent

    Palmer Station is one of several national research stations on the Peninsula. The benefit of being on a cruise ship is that we were visited by scientists from Palmer. The downside is that we could not go ashore in zodiacs to walk on the continent. Included in this tip are photos of some of the stations that we cruised by. Photographers, I could...

    more
  • Ice and More Ice

    The cruiser will have the chance to see ice, and a lot of it, when sailing in the Antarctic. Eighty percent of the Southern Hemisphere is water, and weather systems proceed around the earth unimpeded. And it is cold. No small wonder that the continent has so much ice. The ice sheet covers 99% of the continent, is 90% of the world's ice, and 70% of...

    more
  • The Small Boat That Could

    We were not alone in our big cruise ship. Into the silent world came a single-masted sailing ship. Where did it come from? It trailed us for a while, and, after a hundred or so images, it drifted away. Photographers, it was proof that the old saw about F/8 and Be There was never more true. It was early in the morning and it would have been so easy...

    more
  • Glaciers and Bergs on a Foggy Day

    We woke in the morning and found we were in a black and white world. The landscape of mountains, ice and water was muted by clouds and fog. Much of the morning it snowed, a fine particle snow. Our ship glided silently through the ghostly waters. We ignored the conditions, took photographs...and then took more. Photographers, bring extra memory...

    more

Top Antarctica Hotels

Île Amsterdam Hotels
2 Reviews - 8 Photos
Grytviken Hotels
17 Reviews - 23 Photos

Instant Answers: Antarctica

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

28 travelers online now

Comments

Antarctica Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Antarctica things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Antarctica sightseeing.
Map of Antarctica